Author Topic: By Jupiter  (Read 60571 times)

Offline Ian S C

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #45 on: January 20, 2018, 01:05:04 PM »
Probably not relevent to the subject here, but I have read of manifolds being made by electro depositing copper on a wax form, I think the flanges were silver soldered on after the elbow was formed. Your method seems a much better (more expensive) method, the engine you have chosen  sets a high standard to follow.
Ian S C

Offline Jim Nic

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #46 on: January 20, 2018, 01:11:26 PM »
", it is gratifying to know someone out there is interested."
It's not that I'm not interested, it's that I am agog at the the skill shown and the lengths gone to (not to mention the apparent expense) to produce just one part of a model. 
I have no knowledge of the process so have nothing to contribute except admiration, so please keep up the story.
Jim
The person who never made a mistake never made anything.

Offline kvom

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #47 on: January 20, 2018, 01:20:37 PM »
Very impressive engine and a daunting prospect to take over.  Hopefully these manifolds are the hardest part.

Online Vixen

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #48 on: January 20, 2018, 02:41:31 PM »
Ian  Electrodeposited copper over wax was used to form the inlet manifolds and water jackets of several engines during the 'Great War'. To me it was yet another unknow technique for which I am not equipped. I had done some small scale lost wax castings before and had some basic equipment. Better the devil etc.

Incidentally, we are planning a visit to NZ next Christmas to see our son. He spent last year helping rebuild Ch.Ch after the big shake. We would love to meet up with you and other members while we are down that way.

Jim  I do not mind going to great lengths to produce a fine replica engine but would have prefered less expense.

Kvom, It would be nice to think these manifolds were the hardest part but I fear the water heated manifold between the engine and the carburetor and also the induction spirol will present their own challenges. Was it President Kennedy who said, "We don't choose do it because it is easy etc."

Same could be said for your Colibri, nice work.

Cheers

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Offline kvom

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #49 on: January 20, 2018, 06:08:31 PM »
Thanks, but the Colibri presents no real difficulties beyond the size of the parts as far as constructing it goes.  The real question is how well it will run with metal parts vs. wood.  Are you planning to finish your small scale plastic version?  I considered reducing the size myself but wasn't sure I could find the proper shoulder heim joints.

Offline Fugell

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #50 on: January 24, 2018, 09:17:09 AM »
Thanks, but the Colibri presents more about Quick Extender Pro but no real difficulties beyond the size of the parts as far as constructing it goes.  The real question is how well it will run with metal parts vs. wood.  Are you planning to finish your small scale plastic version?  I considered reducing the size myself but wasn't sure I could find the proper shoulder heim joints.

Best of luck and keep us posted Mike. That's a marvelous engine.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2022, 11:29:08 AM by Fugell »

Online Vixen

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #51 on: January 24, 2018, 12:28:02 PM »
I took advantage of the milder weather and ventured out into the workshop to fabricate the parts for an engine running / display / build stand. I was always fearful that the Jupiter could and would eventually topple over in the wooden stand. Besides it could not be doing the valve gear for the bottom two cylinders any good with the weight of the full engine bearing on the valve gear,  The steel tubes were recycled from an old high stool, the bends were neat and in just the right place for this engine stand. I have provision for adding extra side bars, if required, to hold the engine down while it is running. I disposed of our welding gear some time ago (I never could achieve a neat cosmetic weld), so called in our friendly local mobile welder to do the job. He turned up in a white van, with a fully equipped welding workshop in the back. MIG, TIG, Plasma, compressor, grinders, argon, Co2,  mixed gas cylinders: the full works. It took him half an hour on the drive to do the welding and a further two hours to talk about engines.







You can also see the Flight Case I built to store and transport the Jupiter. As you can imagine, I was not able to find a case of the right size, so I bought a second-hand guitar Flight Case from some failed rock and roll star, off E-bay. It was all the wrong shape but provided all the materials and fittings I would need. I dismantled it completely, cut the panels to my bespoke size and reassembled it. All I am awaiting is the four new fold flat carrying handles, they are coming on the slow boat from China.





Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Offline Roger B

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #52 on: January 24, 2018, 01:42:08 PM »
Ian  Electrodeposited copper over wax was used to form the inlet manifolds and water jackets of several engines during the 'Great War'. To me it was yet another unknow technique for which I am not equipped. I had done some small scale lost wax castings before and had some basic equipment. Better the devil etc.

I'm also following along and learning  :)  :wine1:

One of my previous employers used to make high precision waveguides for linear accelerators by machining the 'space' out of aluminium, electro depositing the copper and then melting out the aluminium.
Best regards

Roger

Online Jo

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #53 on: January 24, 2018, 01:51:18 PM »
Looks like better welding than I can do  :)

Jo
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 06:54:30 PM by Jo »
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #54 on: January 24, 2018, 09:05:53 PM »
Great stand for a Fantastic Engine  :praise2:

Nice flight case too - but here I can't help myself, from my line of work nowadays, as I'm in the music business - the case should be filled with foam, to make sure that it doesn't rattle inside the box (you probably thought of this already).
I can think of two ways to do this - either the "easy way" as in a former thread here (or was it HMEM  :noidea: ) - wrap the engine in plastic film, and "cast" the foam around it, or get a full block of the stuff and "cut the engine out of it" and glue the rest into the case. The thread was about making drawers for tools - I think it was Achim - but I might remember this wrong ....

The last is apparently also easy with the right tools. The father of my Boss makes high quality flight cases and he spend a few thousand Pounds on the tool to do so .....

Nice to see you back here with more projects Tug  :popcorn:

Best wishes

Per

Online crueby

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #55 on: January 24, 2018, 09:14:22 PM »
Great stand for a Fantastic Engine  :praise2:

Nice flight case too - but here I can't help myself, from my line of work nowadays, as I'm in the music business - the case should be filled with foam, to make sure that it doesn't rattle inside the box (you probably thought of this already).
I can think of two ways to do this - either the "easy way" as in a former thread here (or was it HMEM  :noidea: ) - wrap the engine in plastic film, and "cast" the foam around it, or get a full block of the stuff and "cut the engine out of it" and glue the rest into the case. The thread was about making drawers for tools - I think it was Achim - but I might remember this wrong ....

The last is apparently also easy with the right tools. The father of my Boss makes high quality flight cases and he spend a few thousand Pounds on the tool to do so .....

Nice to see you back here with more projects Tug  :popcorn:

Best wishes

Per
A few weeks ago someone showed me that thread, its for casting fitted drawer liners for tools and such. Here is a link to it on MadModder:
http://madmodder.net/index.php?topic=4770.0

Online Vixen

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #56 on: January 24, 2018, 10:05:12 PM »
Hi Per and Chris

I was proposing to secure the engine stand to the lower half of the Flight Case with clamps. I did not know how I was going to constrain the engine within the top half of the case to stop it shaking about. Now I know how to do it.

Thanks to you both.

Since the photos were taken I have fitted 8 ball corners to the Flight Case.

Mike
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:12:38 PM by Vixen »
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Online Vixen

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #57 on: February 09, 2018, 01:43:46 PM »
Another four inlet manifolds have arrived from my Hatton Gardens jewellers. If anything, these four are nicer than the first pair with almost no fettling required, except for the obvious removal of the casting feeder. The foundry cleverly positioned the feeder to make it easy to cut off and file smooth. I will order the final batch of three inlet manifold castings out of next months allowance. Just Castings Ltd do the lost wax castings very quickly and efficiently. One week from posting the waxes to delivery of the castings by recorded delivery. And they send candies every time.




I have made this drilling fixture to hold the castings accurately, while I drill the bolt holes in the flange. I will wait untill all nine castings are available and do them as one big batch






While all the inlet manifold casting work has been going on, I have been busy making 18 exhaust stubs for the opposite side of the cylinder heads. The flange was milled from mild steel plate, the tubular part from 16mm diameter steel tube. I made a swaging tool, right of photo,  to expand the tube into a recess milled in the rear face of the flange. Not looking forward to making all those 8BA studs. 18 x 4 = lots of tedium.



Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Online Jo

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #58 on: February 09, 2018, 01:47:55 PM »
I can tell you have been bitten by the Jupiter bug Mike  ;)

And they send candies every time.

That is to help you get over the shock of the cost  ::)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jasonb

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Re: By Jupiter
« Reply #59 on: February 09, 2018, 01:57:04 PM »
. And they send candies every time.
That explains why you are order in them in several batches.

Exhaust stubs look good too.

J