Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176862 times)

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #195 on: July 10, 2013, 01:23:16 AM »
Eric, Bill and George

Thanks guys for the kind words I appreciate it.

George; I do enjoy the CNC work along with the solid modeling and CAM; although the CAM software is just a necessary evil to get parts made and can be a real test of patience sometimes.

Dave

Offline MuellerNick

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #196 on: July 10, 2013, 11:11:06 AM »
Quote
These dimensions were entered into an Excel Spread sheet that could be printed and used at the lathe. The dome is a little more than ½ done here.


So your lathe has BNC. Not to confuse with CNC! BNC is Biological Numeric Control.  :ROFL:
Nice pieces of work!




Nick

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #197 on: July 11, 2013, 12:39:07 AM »
Why yes; what Nick said, "BNC" I like that  :cheers:

Thanks for the kind words Nick.

Dave

Offline steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #198 on: July 11, 2013, 11:56:38 AM »

Thanks  Dave

The indexing head is a sweetheart; Kalamazoo I believe; it is very well made and the tilting feature makes it handy for some things, it is also very rigid. I picked it up used at our local used machinery dealer. I purchased a new tail stock for it from Kalamazoo through our local dealer and it was an absolute piece of junk from points Far East; it got sent back.

I started watching eBay and it wasn’t too long before I found a nice used one only this one was US made and matches the quality of the indexer.

This sad thing is Kalamazoo who used to make pretty darn good stuff now outsources at least some of their tooling to Asia.
I have one of their 2” X 48” belt sanders and it is a well-made tool; I guess going forward I would ask the country of origin before paying a premium price just for name sake.

Dave

Thanks for that Dave....would love to have one of those in 3C...!

But not junk!...good stuff....

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #199 on: July 17, 2013, 02:03:11 AM »
Hi Everyone

Here are some construction photos of the Pacific rod; the rod has brasses on each end with a turned steel center. I wonder if this is a hold out from the steam engine designs; the split small end bearing isn’t something you see very often on an IC engine.
I accidently deleted the construction of the brasses and didn’t take any of the hardware machining. The brasses were left a little oversize on the radius so they could be turned as a unit assembled on the rod. I roughed them out on the CNC so that is how I originally generated the radius.


First a suitable piece of 12L14 stock was faced to length and centered on both ends.



Then the center was machined just a little larger than the finished fat part in the middle of the rod.



Using a V block the profile on each end of the rod was machined leaving the radius on the ends a few thou over for turning later; also at this time the holes were drilled.



Here the 1/16” hole is drilled all the way to the middle of the rod for oiling; it gets an intersecting hole put in later.



Back in the lathe and indicated in using a 4 jaw chuck the first taper is machined and the radius at the root is also cut with the same tool.
You may notice that in the next few pictures the radius at the root is smaller; that is because I goofed and made it too large the first time. I re-ground the tool and went back and re-cut them.
Not shown the rod is flipped and the same was done for the other end.



Turning the radius on the sides was a bit of a challenge; the radius is not centered with the rod axis so the rod assembly needed to be offset for turning.
A fixture was made the mount the rod assembly to with the proper offset; two sets of mounting holes were included. One set for each end of the rod.
First the big end is done; first one side the rod is removed and rotated and then the other side is turned. Two pair of special stepped studs were made as the one end of each of the brasses is threaded so a thread size that would slide through the threaded hole was chosen.



First the big end is done; first one side the rod is removed and rotated and then the other side is turned. Two pair of special stepped studs were made as the one end of each of the brasses is threaded so a thread size that would slide through the threaded hole was chosen.



And after the first side is completed; you can see part of the fixture was machined away so the tool would clear the end of the bearing.


The completed piston and rod assembly with the proper hardware



Here is a shot of the inside.
I need to do a thorough cleaning of the cylinder then I can do a test fit of the new parts.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave



Offline smfr

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #200 on: July 17, 2013, 02:52:23 AM »
Beautiful work as always, Dave. I like your offset fixtures to get the radii.

Simon

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #201 on: July 17, 2013, 04:17:26 AM »
Beautiful work as always, Dave. I like your offset fixtures to get the radii.

Simon
Like Simon said Dave, beautiful work and photos.

Don

Offline steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #202 on: July 17, 2013, 04:20:41 AM »
Your work is always georgous Dave!
 :praise2:

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline NickG

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #203 on: July 17, 2013, 08:05:38 AM »
That is really nice Dave,

never seen that oil hole down the middle before - good idea that.

I am used to, on locos at least seeing a steel cap on the other side of the big end - is this an i.c. thing that it is omitted?

Nick

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #204 on: July 17, 2013, 09:11:19 AM »
Hi Dave, I noticed your V block and was wondering where you purchased this multi position block. I would like to have a set like it. The set I have is limited.

Don

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #205 on: July 17, 2013, 12:05:40 PM »
Lovely work as always Dave...and the pictures are still perfect!!

Bill

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #206 on: July 18, 2013, 01:00:07 AM »
Thanks for all the kind words guys as always it is much appreciated.

Nick; the hole down the center of the rod is exactly how the original engine was made. Some builders have added a grease cup here but to keep with the original design I went with only the small hole. I'm hoping a squirt with the oil can once and a while will suffice.

As far as the steel end plate goes; like the oil hole this is just the way the original was made. I don't know that I have ever seen the steel plate on a stationary engine. Maybe because the bulk of the force is pushing from the piston down to the crank; where on a steam engine the force is the same in both directions. Therefore the bottom half of the bearing also needs support.

Don; the V block and clamp is a Starrett #568 they are sold as singles as far as I know; I do have a smaller pair of Starrett V blocks that are matched. This is the one I use the most. It is nice that the clamp is inside of the block so if you have it clamped in a milling vice you can remove the clamp with out disturbing your setup. 

Thanks again guys,
Dave


Offline NickG

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #207 on: July 18, 2013, 01:59:39 PM »
Dave, good point I didn't think about the force although all the force will mainly be putting tension in the bolts. Could be as you say just to stop them pulling into the softer bronze.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #208 on: August 14, 2013, 01:00:57 AM »
Hi Everyone

I had a few modifications that I wanted to do the the engine base before I started on the ignitor and intake valve chest. To facilitate casting and to have a place for the core print there was a large hole in the top of the base. This would allow the waste oil to drain down through the base and on to the skid.

The base needed to be sealed up and a proper drain put in; as far as I know this is the way the original engines were. I have seen several different locations for the drain in photos and I chose to run it out the side as seen on a Pacific/Union marine engine.

Also bosses were added for the mounting bolts as well as a boss for the intake air pipe to pass through.


Here is a shot of the base casting showing the cored hole.


A piece of ½” hot rolled steel was rescued from the scrap box .


The top side of the new oil pan is machined along with the outer profile.


The base was set up in the mill and a matching pocket cut to hold the new oil pan.


The oil pan was a light tap in fit and glued in place using Loctite anaerobic gasket sealer. It was left about .01” proud and faced off after the adhesive curred.


And a shot from the bottom.


After taking a skim cut with a fly cutter it is now nice and flat.


Set up in the mill the base is counter bored for the new boss.


Using a ¼” ball end mill the oil drain is connected to the pan area.


Here the new boss has been installed and taped for the drain pipe. Also a little blending work has been done with Devcon steel filled epoxy.


The bosses were turned from cast iron bar stock.


The holes in the base were machined to accommodate the new bosses.


Then they were Loctited in place.


And finally a shot of the new air intake boss along with the new mounting bosses after a little body work with the Devcon.

Now on the to the piston trip ignitor, :cartwheel:

Thanks for checking in.
Dave




Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #209 on: August 14, 2013, 01:16:47 AM »
She's looking good Dave, and like always your work is superb. Nice to see some more progress on it though. That is a beautiful looking engine Dave and I will be glad when I can attempt one like that.  :ThumbsUp:

Don