Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176555 times)

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #120 on: February 16, 2013, 01:03:04 AM »
Hi Everyone

Im still working on exhaust valve related stuff; here are a group of pictures showing the machining of the swing arm. The swing arm holds the crossover cam follower shoe and the valve lifter. It is suspended between the upper and lower supports and pivots on setscrews with a 60 point.

I figured that the easiest way to hang onto this casting would be to make a fixture that allowed all machining operations to be done in one set up.


Here is the raw casting for the swing arm.


The fixture is a button V block and strap clamp indexed in a square collet block.


Here is the swing arm casting mounted in the fixture. The fixture was set on the surface plate and the follower shoe pivot housing was indicated to be in the same plane as the center line of the V. this was accomplished by flipping the block over and adjusting the position until the same indicator reading was obtained both ways.


The sides of the valve lifter mounting surface are brought to the proper thickness.


Standing the block vertical the 3rd face of the valve lifter surface is machined.


Also at this time the length of the follower shoe housing is machined as well as the top end of the arm. This length is measured from the top of the follower shoe housing.


Laying the block down with the swing arm upside down; the bottom pivot area is machined flat.


The follower shoe housing is centered, spotted, drilled and reamed.


The upper and lower pivots are centered and center drilled.


The last operation is to machine the round area on the top above where the valve lifter will mount.


Here is the finished swing arm; the pivot hole for that valve lifter needs to be added but not until a few more parts are completed.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:27:40 PM by Dave Otto »

Online Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #121 on: February 16, 2013, 01:25:12 AM »
You made that machining job look easy Dave. That was a nice setup and I enjoyed the photos with all the steps to go with it. Thanks for the education, I will have to remember that setup. The engine is really shaping up nicely and should be beautiful engine when complete.

Don

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #122 on: February 16, 2013, 01:44:22 AM »
That turned out well Dave. Nice fixturing too. The whole engine is amazing!!

Bill

Offline metalmad

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #123 on: February 16, 2013, 02:07:02 AM »
Hi Dave
I have not seen the button V block before, its Wonderful!
Love your Work!
Pete
A little bit every day, sometimes the same little bit

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #124 on: February 16, 2013, 02:27:05 AM »
So you take some time, build a setup, and it turns out to be a shortcut, saving time, and helps the accuracy of the final product. I wonder if I'm smart enough to follow that lead?

Offline swilliams

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #125 on: February 16, 2013, 07:12:11 AM »
Very nicely thought out job on the swing arm Dave. That fixture is a winner

Steve

Offline steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #126 on: February 16, 2013, 09:51:35 AM »
That fixture made that job easy!   Nicely Done Dave! :praise2: :praise2:


Dave
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Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #127 on: February 16, 2013, 01:51:14 PM »
"The swing arm holds the crossover cam follower shoe and the valve lifter. "

Good thing I don't have to know what the terms mean or do to enjoy seeing the nice work and great setup examples!   I think Zee and I share a inclination to use the word "thingy" a LOT.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #128 on: February 17, 2013, 04:48:53 PM »
Thanks for all the kind words guys!

The exhaust valve timing parts of this engine have been an interesting project in its self.  This assembly is one of the things that make the Pacific a rather interesting and unique engine.

So you take some time, build a setup, and it turns out to be a shortcut, saving time, and helps the accuracy of the final product. I wonder if I'm smart enough to follow that lead?

Mosey; I have never been one to enjoy making tools and fixtures but sometimes you just gotta do it. There are a couple of tools I would like to make for the lathe but I just never seem to find the time.

Thanks again,
Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #129 on: February 17, 2013, 04:53:21 PM »
Hi Everyone
I have some old work and some new work to post and it is starting to get confusing to me what to do next. So if some of the dates and order of pictures seem a little strange that is why.
Last time I machined the upper swing arm bracket and swing arm so now we will move the bottom bracket and the cross over cam follower shoe. Eventually it will all come together and make since.

As I think that I had said before I also changed the design of the bottom bracket slightly from the blue prints. It was modeled in Alibre and printed 2d in full scale so the position and fit on the body casting could be checked. The model was tweaked to fit the casting as well as get the mounting hardware to fit.


Once I was happy with the position and fit; the body casting was skimmed to give the bracket a flat place to sit.


Then the mounting holes spotted.


Then drilled and tapped.


Brass stock for the bracket is faced off.


Then the profile machined.


After lying the stock down on its side and locating the datum the pivot bolt hole is drilled and tapped.


Then the end is rounded over.


Flipped the other direction the mounting holes are drilled and the end rounded over.


Standing the stock back up in the vise the bracket is sawn from the stock.


Almost done!


Testing the fit using a temporary screw.


Here is the bracket after some hand work and a trip through the blast cabinet; also the proper hardware has been machined and installed.
Next time the bronze follower shoe.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:35:50 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline smfr

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #130 on: February 17, 2013, 06:37:03 PM »
This thread is a continual inspiration, both the machine work and the hand work. Do you have any tips to share about how, for example, you get such a nice consistent radius through hand filing?

Simon

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #131 on: February 19, 2013, 05:41:33 PM »
Thanks Simon

When I do hand work I usually always have my Optivisor on as my eye sight isn't what it use to be. I also have a stereo microscope but usually the Optivisor is adequate.  I always sit down when doing this type of work; you just have more control if you are relaxed and have something to rest your arm on. Small files with safe edges are used even some of my needle files and rifflers have safe  edges.

When the parts allows I will tear narrow strips of sanding cloth from the roll; holding the work in a vise with smooth jaws the sanding cloth is used in a shoe shine fashion to blend edges and outside curves.

One other tool I really like are these sanding sticks from Micro Mark; a different color for each grit (I wrote grit on mine with a sharpie). The 320 and 400 grit belts are much less aggressive than a file and work great for fine detail work.

http://www.micromark.com/micro-sanding-wand-set,7760.html

Also depending on how much material needs to be removed I will use high quality carbide burrs in my Dremel to do the initial shaping.  Also for Iron castings cartridge rolls and a die grinder work great. I purchased the 4690A91 kit from McMaster Carr and for model work will probable last a life time.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#cartridge-sanding-rolls/=ljqtri

One last thing; I find sitting and the bench doing this kind of work very relaxing.

Hope this helps a little,
Dave



Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #132 on: February 22, 2013, 01:24:06 AM »
Hi Everyone

The next step in the valve gear construction is the follower shoe; this was my first trial part I had made last summer. I made a couple extras that I can finish later if needed.

The original shoe was a bronze casting so I decided to make mine one piece instead of a silver soldered assembly.


Here the blank has been turned from 660 bronze stock.


Then the excess was cut off in the band saw.


And the other side.


The blank was machined to the proper thickness; here it is standing behind a rapid proto-type test part that I made at work.


Here the blank is set up in the mill to machine the first side; I did this at work on my CNC but could easily be made on a manual machine.


The first side has been surfaced with a small carbide ball end mill.


Working on the second side


Here is the part off of the mill next to one of the prototype parts.


Because the shank was left oversize for rigidity a split collet was made to hold the cam so the shank could be turned down.


Here is the collet in use.


And finally a group shot with the upper and lower brackets, swing arm, follower shoe and the proper hardware machined and installed on the engine body.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:45:14 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #133 on: February 22, 2013, 01:29:10 AM »
Beautiful, Dave.
Now I know why I need a collet block, to hold the split collets that I need also.
Mosey

Online Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #134 on: February 22, 2013, 02:18:27 AM »
Beautiful bit of work Dave, I am really enjoying following your progress. Learning to make jigs and fixtures is on my list.

Don