Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176828 times)

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #105 on: February 12, 2013, 01:11:22 PM »
Rudy Kouhoupt had a chipless shop, also. Look at his videos.
The secret is a good dustpan and vacuum cleaner.
Suspicions of witchcraft.
Nice, though.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #106 on: February 13, 2013, 01:14:49 AM »
Mosey, we will get that valve seat cut; its down the road aways I have a bit more material to get posted first.
Steamer is correct; the springy thin is a parallel keeper. I purchased it years ago from one of the industrial suppliers; can't remember who though.

>>Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:

Aw common not all my pictures are swarfless; just some of them :).

Thanks everyone for the complements, I appreciate them.

Dave


Offline steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #107 on: February 13, 2013, 02:02:42 AM »
Rudy once told me that the most used tool in his shop was his shop vac!

Keep it coming Dave.....Sweeeeeeet!

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #108 on: February 14, 2013, 01:30:27 AM »
Hi everyone

Continuing on with the exhaust valve chest, exhaust valve and related parts; I would like to try to finish this assembly before I move on to the piston, rod, and head.

My plan thus far is to deviate from the plans somewhat; Iím working to keep everything proper as far as the prototype goes. I decided not to use a couple of iron castings that came with the kit; the first one is the top support; this part guides the bottom end of the valve and also serves as a pivot for the top end of the swing arm. The reason is, first I like the look of the brass parts on the original engine; and second I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

I modeled the top support in Alibre and carved it out on my CNC here at home. It is only a 2 axis so there was a lot of hand work involved.


Here is the basic profile being cut from brass bar stock.


The boss for the swing arm pivot is machined as it is centered in the support but not as thick.


After the top side was machined the part was turned over and the bulk of the excess material removed from one end (notice the valve guide was reamed in the previous step).
Using the valve guide as the datum the bottom side of the pivot boss is machined.


The rest of the excess material is removed in the band saw.


After the support is brought to proper thickness the excess junk will be cut away.

I got carried away and didnít take very many pictures of this process but after the machine work was completed quite a bit of time was spent with files and sandpaper getting an acceptable shape.


I also got carried away and neglected to leave enough material for the bosses on the top and bottom of the valve guide; those were turned up and silver soldered in place.


Now the is set up in the mill to fit the upper and lower swing arm supports along with drilling and taping the valve chest mounting holes and drilling exhaust port. I altered the shape of the bottom support bracket from the print just a little; all the brackets I have seen pictures of are a little different shape and style from one to the other. I think the horsepower of the engine and possibly age determined the style of the support. I chose to model the simple right angle support with its mounting holes in line above each other.


Here the body casting along with the cylinder is set up in the mill and dialed in using the crank bearing for the datum. Every thing is based off of the center line of the engine.


The upper support mounting pads are machined to the final height; this is based on the valve chest mounting boss. I set my valve chest and upper support on the surface plate and measured the valve stem centerline. As it turns out on my engine they are in the same plane; so this is what I cut the pads to.

I will remove .01Ē form the valve chest later to accommodate the copper valve chest gasket thickness.


The pads are spotted, drilled, and tapped for the upper support.


The exhaust port is drilled into the cylinder.


Finished!


I didnít take and pictures of the machining but here are the exhaust valve chest studs installed in the cylinder.


And with the valve chest and proper nuts installed.

Next I will go over the swing arm and lower support machining.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:09:42 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #109 on: February 14, 2013, 01:39:08 AM »
Dave, if you would of never said anything I would of never known you had messed up. It is looking great to me. You photos a top rate and love to follow along with you.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #110 on: February 14, 2013, 01:54:17 AM »
Nice job on that support. Really beautiful.
And another great post!
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #111 on: February 14, 2013, 02:05:53 AM »
Wow Dave....that is beautiful!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #112 on: February 14, 2013, 02:15:51 AM »
Don,

I could have salvaged the casting as the error was internal and would have never showed. It would have involved plugging two holes and re-machining them. I weighed both options and starting over was easier and Roland had the casting on hand. A couple of days and I had the new casting in the mail (he is good that way).


Zee, a while back you guys were talking bout blasting parts to change the texture; the support bracket was blasted with super fine glass bead in my homemade blast cabinet. I really like the finish it gives to machined parts that should have been a casting; it also does a beautiful job on bronze castings but I don't care for it so much on iron castings.

Thanks guys.

Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #113 on: February 14, 2013, 02:17:17 AM »
Thanks Dave!

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #114 on: February 14, 2013, 02:29:25 AM »
Very nice work with the files and sandpaper.   Bracket looks great.   

Offline Jo

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #115 on: February 14, 2013, 07:19:39 AM »
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Stuart

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #116 on: February 14, 2013, 08:06:08 AM »
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo


Jo

of course we are interested in any fabrication technique , BTW what is the quality of the castings from Cotswolds ?  PM if you do not wish to comment here


Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Jo

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #117 on: February 14, 2013, 08:22:23 AM »
Stuart,

The castings from Cotwold are very good, it is the mounting costs for each of the sets for the Armstrong that aren't. Personally I think that there are two castings from set B that I would choose to start from a casting rather than fabricate: the governor pedestal & feed pump, but I would part fabricated the pump starting from the casting  ;)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Stuart

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #118 on: February 14, 2013, 10:30:33 AM »
thanks for the info


yes the part kit bit adds up





Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #119 on: February 15, 2013, 01:08:36 AM »
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo

Hi Jo

I like governors too; especially the vertical fly ball type. There are several reasons I'm not using the governor on my engine; first and foremost I have a plan to model a double acting pump that will be gear driven from the crank shaft on the PTO side of the engine. This will be scaled from some original advertising and the gear drive will reside where the governor would mount on the crankshaft.


The Pacific governor is a dog bone type that operates a sleeve on the crank which intern operates the latch arm to hold the exhaust valve open.
The governor adds interest to the engine but it doesn't work very well at this size; my preference for  hit and miss engines is to have them hit one time and come up on the governor and latch out. The way this one works it take several (or more) hits to come up to speed. This is compounded by the piston trip ignitor which by design always has the timing retarded. The engine doesn't hit hard enough to help get it up on the governor on the first hit; the engine also has low compression due the large dead volume in the combustion chamber. This can be improved somewhat by making the piston taller or the rod longer; but you can only go so far with that.

Not all Pacific engines had governors and I'm not sure if any of the little guys had them. My engine is roughly a 1/3 scale of a 3/4 HP engine so it is one of the little guys. If I can pull it off the pump and it's drive system will more than make up for the lack of the governor.

Here is a picture of a large full sized engine on display at Antique Power Land near Brooks, Oregon; you can see the dog bone weight on the crank.


I agree with you fully on the fabrication; some of the work going on around here is just incredible. I will fabricate when needed but I really enjoy the CNC process; the CAD design work, creating tool paths in the CAM program and finally setting up and running the machine. Is CNC necessary to build this engine? not at all; there have already be been more than a few built using conventional machine tools.

I'm able to stick a few things together but fabrication is an area of model engineering where I could use a little more practice; well maybe more than just a little.

I would love to see your work on the Armstrong Hydraulic engine.

Thanks everyone for the comments and kind words.
Dave

« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:15:43 PM by Dave Otto »