Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176574 times)

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #90 on: February 07, 2013, 02:15:50 AM »
Hi Guys

Thanks or all the great comments; I sure appreciate them.

Watching you do the flywheel has made me realise something I mustn't do when I machine my cast one - shouldn't turn the OD of the boss, I did it on the only other cast flywheel I've machined and it doesn't look right. Should be painted up to the face.
Looking good.

Nick you got me thinking; initially I was not happy because I forgot to machine the hubs but after your comment and looking at my full sized engines; I think I just may leave the hubs rough cast.



My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.


I'm not quite sure what is going on here, not familiar with that machine and what broaching is.

What a fabulous bit of work and a thread to match.

Chris

Chris the tool is an arbor press; it is a hand operated rack and pinion style press. They are nice because you have good feel of what you are doing. They come in lots of different sizes; this one is a Dake #3 a nice American made tool.


I posted this picture the other day but if you look at the left hand side you can see the arbor press poking out from behind my work bench.

The broach is a key-way cutting tool that is pushed through the work with the press; it has staggered (or stepped ) teeth so each tooth takes a little more material than the previous one. The broach is guided by the bushing that is inserted in the bore. Usually after the first pass a shim is installed behind the broach and it is pushed through again until the key-way is the desired depth. In this picture the broach has been pushed far enough into the bore that you can't see the teeth.

In this case the bushing was machined with the broach guide at a 1/8" per foot angle to match the key. This way when the key is tapped in place it locks up and holds the flywheel securely to the crankshaft.

Hope this helps,
Dave

« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 01:04:03 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline Chris J

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #91 on: February 07, 2013, 08:17:44 AM »

Chris the tool is an arbor press; it is a hand operated rack and pinion style press. They are nice because you have good feel of what you are doing. They come in lots of different sizes; this one is a Dake #3 a nice American made tool.

I posted this picture the other day but if you look at the left hand side you can see the arbor press poking out from behind my work bench.

The broach is a key-way cutting tool that is pushed through the work with the press; it has staggered (or stepped ) teeth so each tooth takes a little more material than the previous one. The broach is guided by the bushing that is inserted in the bore. Usually after the first pass a shim is installed behind the broach and it is pushed through again until the key-way is the desired depth. In this picture the broach has been pushed far enough into the bore that you can't see the teeth.

In this case the bushing was machined with the broach guide at a 1/8" per foot angle to match the key. This way when the key is tapped in place it locks up and holds the flywheel securely to the crankshaft.

Hope this helps,
Dave

Ah thanks Dave.

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Online steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #92 on: February 07, 2013, 09:50:44 AM »
Very nicely done Dave!

 :praise2: :praise2:

Dave
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #93 on: February 07, 2013, 12:04:38 PM »
Seems I missed a few days of checking in on you Dave and missed a LOT of progress on it. Truly amazing work as always from the babbit bearings to the grease cups to the bearing hardward, crankshaft and finally the flywheel. What a showpiece !!!!  I'll try to stay more current from now on :)

Bill

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #94 on: February 08, 2013, 12:52:27 AM »
Bill and Dave, Thanks and Thanks,

My project has kind of stalled on my end due to other time commitments; I starting to feel withdrawal symptoms. I need to carve out at least a few hours to work on the engine to cure this problem; maybe this weekend.

Dave

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #95 on: February 08, 2013, 01:12:33 AM »
Hi Everyone,

Here are some pictures of machining the 12-24 high crown bolts for the cylinder and body to sub base mounting; I also made a few extras to mount the engine to the display base or skid. Also some machining to the bottom of the cylinder mounting flange to tidy it up as the rough cast surface is uneven and the flange was too thick.


The 5/16" hex stock was chucked in the small 3 jaw; turned, chamfered and threaded with the tail stock die holder.

[IMGhttp://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts_2.jpg[/img]http://The bolts are turned around and held in a collet; turned to length and the radius cut using a form tool.


Here are the finished bolts; the long ones will be used to hold the engine to the skids or base when the time comes.


Here are the cylinder mounting bolts installed; note there are two of them under the water ports that have to be shorter to clear the piping. This is also the way the original engines were.


Here is a worm’s eye view of the same.


One detail still needing attention on the body casting was to thin the cylinder mounting flange. The way mine came out I needed to remove almost .1" to get it to the .281" dimension on the print.


A support bar was made to support the flange end while the body was held in the 4 jaw chuck. The center was left a little loose while the flange was indicated; then tightened enough to support the body.


Here you can see the rough cast uneven surface of the underside of the flange.


And after a little machining and blending.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 01:19:01 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #96 on: February 08, 2013, 01:24:26 AM »
Love to follow your work Dave , it truly amazing work and all beautifully done to high quality. Great photos also.

Don

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #97 on: February 10, 2013, 02:38:43 PM »
Dave,
After following you on this project, and seeing the organized, expert, and careful work, I went back into my shop determined to do better. I am more focused and careful. The work is a level better. now.
Thanks.
Will be watching you.
Mosey

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #98 on: February 10, 2013, 02:49:56 PM »
I agree with Mosey a 1000%. this thread has been as much motivational as educational. This is what us "junior model makers" should strive for. :NotWorthy: :cheers:

Eric

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #99 on: February 12, 2013, 01:13:29 AM »
Hi Everyone,

Don, Mossey & Eric you guys are too kind but I do really appreciate your comments and it makes me proud that this little project is an inspiration to others; is has also given me some great shop time and enjoyment so far and for me that is what it is all about.

Working on the exhaust valve chest casting and some of the related timing parts. The relationship of all these parts is somewhat critical so everything aligns and works properly. I took only the minimum amount from the valve chest mating surfaces to clean the rough casting. I wanted to keep the valve (initially) as far from the center line of the engine as possible. As it turned out this worked out well; if you build one of these engines I would highly recommend proceeding with caution at this stage.

You will probably notice that some of the pictures seem out of order; this is because I stuffed the original valve chest casting and had to request a new one from Roland :wallbang:. The ports have a D shaped hole that connect the ports above and below the valve seat; well the first one on the exit side came out fine but when I did the inlet side I neglected to rotate the D 180 degrees and cut right into the valve seat. So I did things a little differently on the new casting as far as the order of operations. So some of the photos are from the first casting and some from the replacement.

Also the upper swing arm bracket was completed before I fitted the valve chest to the cylinder as you will see in a future post. I wasn’t sure just how everything was going to line up so there is a little jumping around; but in the end all is well (I think).


Here is the raw casting after a little cleanup and a trip through the blast cabinet.


Holding onto the valve guide I was able to satisfactorily center up the casting in my little 3 jaw chuck. Working carefully the chucking boss was faced and center drilled.


The chucking boss is finished turned and the top of the casting faced off.


The casting is flipped around and the valve guide rough turned as well as the bottom being faced off.


In the mill vice the casting is squared with the side surfaces which will not be machined.

[/img]http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_006.jpg[/img]
The gasket surface is cleaned up (just barely).


Using the center-line as the datum the sides are machined to match the boss on the cylinder. The mounting holes were also drilled at this time.


Back in the lathe the valve guide is turned to size and length; I removed quite a bit of material from the bottom so the chest would match its mounting boss on the cylinder.


Flipped around the chucking lug was removed and the boring and threading done for the valve chamber and plug. Most of the chucking lug was removed in the band saw first.


The print said to spot face the nut locations but I prefer the look of having the whole surfaced milled so that is how I finished the mounting flanges.


Here the water jacket ports are being faced off.


Spot drilled.


Drilled.


And taped 1/16-27 NPT.


Finished; same for the other side.


The valve guide is indicated in.


The valve guide is drilled and reamed.


The exhaust port is taped ¼” NPT.



I still need to do a little hand work and cut the valve seat but for the most part the valve chest is complete.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave


« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 04:56:35 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #100 on: February 12, 2013, 02:01:57 AM »
I CONFESS...I want to see you cut the seat.
Mosey

Is that thin springy strip a protector for the casting from marking by the vise jaws?

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #101 on: February 12, 2013, 02:46:02 AM »
Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #102 on: February 12, 2013, 03:26:20 AM »
I can't add much to what everyone else is saying. I'm really enjoying this.

Good eye Mosey. I'm wondering what that shim looking thing is for too.
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Offline Jo

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #103 on: February 12, 2013, 07:25:59 AM »
Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:

 :o I wish you hadn't mentioned that, I was finding the neat and tidy work bench a few shots back unnerving but those photo's without swarf :hellno: they look rather scary now :paranoia:

Nice work on the engine. I wish when I worked with cast Iron it was as clean as you are making it look :Lol:

Jo
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Online steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #104 on: February 12, 2013, 08:56:31 AM »
NIIIICE build Dave!   I think the springy thing is a spring keeper to keep the parallels in place as he manipulates the part.

....and pay no never mind to the swarfless crowd....I know what chips look like....I want to see the part! ;D :ROFL:

Keep it coming Dave!

Dave
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Damned ijjit!