Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176856 times)

Offline swilliams

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #75 on: February 03, 2013, 10:06:13 AM »
Really nice job on the oil cups Dave. They came up a treat

Steve

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #76 on: February 03, 2013, 06:56:52 PM »
Hi Everyone & thanks for the comments Zee I appreciate it,


I got a harebrained idea to make the crankshaft out of 1144 Stress-Proof thinking that it may stay a little straighter as the excess material was cut away. The smallest piece I could get that would work was 2 ?? dia. So a bunch of material needed to be removed.

After facing the stock to length in my lathe at home I took the blank to work so I could cut it down in my mill there. Flood coolant, a face mill and a 10 hp. Spindle motor made quick work of it.

Also while in the mill at work I drilled the centers and removed the excess material for the throw.


Cutting to length


The Stress-Proof sure turns nice


In my mill at work getting ready to make the round bar into a rectangle


Pretty much to size; I left .050? on the thickness so I could finish it on my friends shaper later on.


Set up to drill the centers


Action shot!


And the finished centers

After the excess material was removed for the throw; I did have to straighten it a little. It had about .02? bow over the length; a little tweaking in the arbor press got it acceptable.


Here is the blank set up in the lathe to turn the throw. The wire near the end is hold the blank against a threaded stud which I?m using to drive the blank. The stud is screwed into a hole in the flange of the collet adaptor.


Action shot!


Here it is with the throw pretty much finished. Besides the turning tool shown I also use small left and right hand insert tools to finish the inside faces of the cheeks



Using the band saw to blank out the extra material; the Roll-In saw makes this part of the job a breeze.


Both sides have been cut and now it?s ready to go back in the lathe; it?s starting to look like a crankshaft now.


Set up between centers and turning the long end.


I ended up turning the shafts to fractional dimensions larger than the finished size so I could rough it out and use collets for holding the already turned ends. My original plan was to do the whole job between centers; but I was fighting chatter real bad and the collet solved this aggravating problem. Here it is flipped around and working on the short end


Here is the set up in the mill to cut the key ways.


And a closer shot.


After the crank was finished I took it over to my friends shop and used his shaper to finish the cheeks to .750? thick. Remember that I had left them over size in anticipation of this. The shaper creates a finish that looks like it could have been ground. The shaper is also going to get a workout cutting the bearing pads on the body casting.


As I told my buddy; the bench centers allow you analyze or agonize over really small TIR numbers. Over all I?m very happy with the way the crank turned out.

Next up; starting work on the body casting.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

May I ask for little more info about how you determined the "bow" in the crank, and how you straightened it?
Mosey

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #77 on: February 05, 2013, 01:26:13 AM »
Hi Dave,

I'm really enjoying this build, the staggered depth bearing caps, in fact all to do with the bearings are a joy to behold.

My one question is, will you be using oil or grease in the greasers, and does it matter which? (sorry, two questions!).

Hugh.

Hugh

Thanks for the kind words.
These cups are designed for grease only; the grease is packed into the cup and as it is screwed down on to the body it will force the grease into the bearing. On these cups there really isn't any place to put any oil.

Mosey

After the crank was blanked out on the band saw there were still two of the original machined surfaces; these should been on the same plane. so it was an easy task to run an indicator over them to determine the bow. Straightening was a matter of putting it in the arbor press and pushing in the middle  until it was straight again.


Here you can see the two straight surfaces that will be machined away to from the shaft.

Actually what happened was that the shaft on each side of the throw had it's own bow; of course the long side was worse the the short side. I decided that I could live with the error and just machine it out. This may have made a very small change in the stroke length; but not a big deal at all.

Thanks for asking
Dave
« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 12:44:22 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #78 on: February 05, 2013, 03:01:28 AM »
I appreciate your taking the time to answer what is a novice question. I wonder whether cranks bow after time as the stresses are released. Could you season them after the first big cuts, and come back later to finish with light cuts. My crank is bowed after a few years of sitting.
Strange. I'll follow your lead and straighten.

Offline NickG

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #79 on: February 05, 2013, 09:36:32 AM »
Looking great Dave, even down to the studs and nuts - single point threading is something I'm going to have to practise. The crank looks amazing, this is proper engineering - made me realise I'm just pittling about!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #80 on: February 06, 2013, 12:36:36 AM »
I appreciate your taking the time to answer what is a novice question. I wonder whether cranks bow after time as the stresses are released. Could you season them after the first big cuts, and come back later to finish with light cuts. My crank is bowed after a few years of sitting.
Strange. I'll follow your lead and straighten.

Mosey, I suppose it is possible for metal to continue to move but I would think if you started with something the was relatively stress free once you finish it would stay straight. If you are using anything that has been cold rolled all bets are off.

One time I took a skim cut on some cast iron model flywheels of an engine I was fixing up to remove rust and pitting; and there was a slight bump or high spot over every spoke. So these flywheels continued to move after they were machined the first time.

Looking great Dave, even down to the studs and nuts - single point threading is something I'm going to have to practise. The crank looks amazing, this is proper engineering - made me realise I'm just pittling about!

Thanks for the kind words Nick; I guess It is all relative. Sometimes when I see the beautiful work others do, I pretty much feel the same way; there are some truly amazing models out there.

Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #81 on: February 06, 2013, 12:57:22 AM »
Hi Everyone
Next up is the machining of the flywheel; as I think I have said before I prefer to do as much fettling as possible before starting on the machine work.

Here is the flywheel casting after smoothing out some of the bumps. The castings are sandblasted after fettling to give everything a uniform finish.


Using my 8Ē Adjust-Tru chuck the flywheel is indicated in. First the spokes and inner rim are adjusted with a DTI for the best possible run out. Then the inner rim is adjusted radialy using the Adjust-Tru feature of the chuck.
A solid carbide boring bar with a brazed tool is used to knock the OD down close to the finished dimension.


After a little fussing around I was able to reach around and machine the back side with one of my insert holders.


The hub is faced to the proper dimension relative the face on the same side. Then center drilled and drilled close to the finished size.



Using a boring bar the bore is brought to the final dimension.
Not shown; the flywheel is reversed in the chuck, indicated in and the hub on the back side is machined to the proper dimension. Also the chamfers are cut on this side as well.


My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.




And finally here are a couple pictures of the engine showing off its new flywheel.

Next a gib head key was machined to hold the flywheel on; nothing to fancy here.


I didnít take many pictures but here Iím cutting the 1/8Ē per foot taper on the key. A tapered parallel was made for this operation


Here is the completed key next to the quick and dirty print I made for it.


After a little had fitting and installed on the engine.
I should have turned the OD of the hub area on the front and back of the flywheel; I will most likely set it back up in the lathe and take care of that before the engine is completed.
Thanks for checking in,
Dave
« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 12:59:33 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #82 on: February 06, 2013, 01:10:06 AM »
I almost feel like slinking away but I know you've been where I am. I have to learn some how.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #83 on: February 06, 2013, 01:20:46 AM »
No no don't go!

Remember were having fun ;)

Dave

Offline tvoght

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #84 on: February 06, 2013, 01:31:10 AM »
I had been watching this build over on the other site, but I lost the trail at some point. I've re-read everything, and now we're on material I haven't yet seen. Really great documentation. Beautiful pictures.

--Tim

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #85 on: February 06, 2013, 01:54:07 AM »
Thanks Tim,

I'm slowly getting caught up; I still have a long way to go on my engine so at some point in the near future what I post will be current info.
It has been fun going back through and updating the text and posting pictures; gives me an idea of what I did last year.

Dave

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #86 on: February 06, 2013, 03:50:27 AM »
Starting to look great with the pieces in context.   Looking more like a piece of art.   :ThumbsUp:

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #87 on: February 06, 2013, 04:12:15 AM »
I agree with Rick, it sure is shaping up. Thanks for educational thread and photos. Getting a blow by blow will help whenever I decide to do casting.

Don

Offline NickG

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Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #88 on: February 06, 2013, 07:48:05 AM »
Watching you do the flywheel has made me realise something I mustn't do when I machine my cast one - shouldn't turn the OD of the boss, I did it on the only other cast flywheel I've machined and it doesn't look right. Should be painted up to the face.
Looking good.

Offline Chris J

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #89 on: February 06, 2013, 09:26:45 AM »


My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.


I'm not quite sure what is going on here, not familiar with that machine and what broaching is.

What a fabulous bit of work and a thread to match.

Chris
Don't believe everything you read on the internet - Abraham Lincoln.