Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176565 times)

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #60 on: January 31, 2013, 04:13:50 AM »
I have enjoyed following your progress Dave, beautiful job pouring the Babbitt. You present a well documented thread great for learning from. Thanks for sharing.

Don

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #61 on: January 31, 2013, 10:59:35 PM »
Wow that is really fascinating Dave. I was very curious about what you'd meant about 'pouring'.
A very informative post.

And BTW...just look at the work table! A lot of stuff has been made on top of that.
That's a keeper to hand down. So many stories in that top.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #62 on: February 01, 2013, 01:42:57 AM »
Hi guys,

Thanks again for all your kind comments.

Pouring Babbitt bearings isn't all that bad of a job and you wouldn't believe how smooth they run. Some engines used Babbitt shells or inserts that fit into machined saddles. The Fairbanks Z engines were like this and my 3hp Falk that I'm restoring also has Babbitt insert bearings. I made these by machining a mold that would make a cored piece of material with some extra length for chucking. 

Then the slug was chucked up in the lathe and all the turning done and parted from the chucking piece. Then the bearing was put in the mill and using a slitting saw it was split in two. After which it was machined down to match the parting line of the bearing shells, shimmed and scraped to a nice running fit.

This could easily be done on a smaller scale for a model; you wouldn't even need to pour the slug you could just hack it out of a Babbitt ingot.  I'm thinking I may do this on my Little Brother engine when I get going on it again.

Zee, Thanks for noticing my little bench; I made it abut 25 years ago and just love it. It is small enough that I have to keep it clean; or at least clean it up at the end of the day. It started out as  a cut off from a much longer work bench; excess from the day job. This is why the boards run the wrong direction; a buddy and I welded up the frame and put some wheels on it. It sits directly behind my lathe and also behind the mill although 90 degrees to it. This way I only need to turn around and most everything I need is there.

I have other benches but this one gets used the most.


Here is a shot of the whole thing; no I don't drink and machine but it was the end of the day.

Dave
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 01:03:17 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #63 on: February 01, 2013, 01:51:39 AM »
Nice looking shop!
Now had that drink been in a mason jar...all would be perfect.  ;D
I like those wood cabinets. There's something about the warmth of wood.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Online steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #64 on: February 01, 2013, 09:04:48 AM »
Beautiful Shop!

Mine will look that good someday!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #65 on: February 01, 2013, 02:00:24 PM »
Ohh! A civilized blighter now aren't we? 'e uses a glass and coaster  :DrinkPint: We usually just swill out of the can or bottle, no need to dirty up any dishes that way you know.  :smokin2: :facepalm2: :naughty:


BC1
Jim

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #66 on: February 01, 2013, 02:44:40 PM »
Very nice.  Now I not only have tool envy but shop envy as well!.   :DrinkPint:

Offline kellswaterri

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #67 on: February 01, 2013, 03:03:56 PM »
Serious shop envy here Dave...good collection of plum bobs...'babbit bearings'  brings back memories of 50+ years ago when I was building the big engines.     
                                                                                 John.

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #68 on: February 01, 2013, 07:48:04 PM »
Dave,
Your work and your shop are an inspiration for this beginner!

I showed her your shop and explained that was what I needed. She just shrugged and walked away. I wonder what she meant?

Mosey

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #69 on: February 02, 2013, 01:32:34 AM »
Wow guys.

I just though I would show Zee my small work bench; I didn't realize it would generate such a great response. Funny thing; you can't see any of my machines in this picture just the corner where I keep some of my collectable junk. I like the look and feel of my little place and because it is warm and my PC is out there that is where I spend quite a bit of time working or not.

Ohh! A civilized blighter now aren't we? 'e uses a glass and coaster  :DrinkPint: We usually just swill out of the can or bottle, no need to dirty up any dishes that way you know.  :smokin2: :facepalm2: :naughty:


BC1
Jim

Jim what you don't see is the keg fridge back in the corner; my brother, a friend of mine and I home brew. When I don't have home brew a few of the local brew pubs will fill my 5gal corny kegs for me so I usually have a keg or two of something good to drink. Sorry no caned beer for this guy. the coaster usually holds the coffee cup. :cheers:

Zee the oak cabinets were postal surplus; back when my dad worked at the PO he purchased them at a postal auction. They had completely remodeled  PO in a small town abut 100 miles from here. they moved all the excess stuff to Boise to sell it off. Dad being a cabinet maker recognized the quality 1/4 sawed oak under the government gray paint. The cabinet with the small drawers was a stamp cabinet and the one with the larger drawers held fingerprinting supplies. You should have seen the look on the guys face that refinished them for me when I told him that i was going to put them in my shop.

Thanks again for the comments.
Dave  :DrinkPint:



Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #70 on: February 02, 2013, 01:55:38 AM »
Hi Everyone

Now that the bearings were complete we need some proper hardware to put it all together; and also a little hand work on the upper bearing


Because the parting line of the bearing is not on the center-line of the crank shaft the upper bearing shell needs to have some clearance so that it can be dropped over the crank. This was done by hand with a triangle scraper; scrape a little check the fit and repeat until the cap could be dropped into position.



Making the nuts is a pretty straight forward turning job; here is the way I did it. First the hex stock was faced, center drilled and drilled. Then the shoulder was turned.


Then the nut is parted off a little over length.


Flipped around in the chuck the nut is tapped?


A mandrel was turned to hold the nut so the top side could be finished.


The nut is screwed on to the mandrel and faced to length; then the bevel is cut.


Here are the finished studs and nuts.


And here they are installed on the engine.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
________________________________________

« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 12:28:51 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline Mosey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #71 on: February 02, 2013, 01:38:03 PM »
How do you turn the taps while threading in the lathe?

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #72 on: February 03, 2013, 01:25:35 AM »
How do you turn the taps while threading in the lathe?

Hi Mosey

On a part like this with a through hole I just slide the tail stock up to the part until the tap starts to cut then just keep a little pressure in it and let the tap do the work. Once the thread is all the way through The lathe is reversed and the tap backed out. Works good with free cutting metals and spiral pointed taps that push the chip out it in front of the tap.

Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #73 on: February 03, 2013, 01:57:21 AM »
Hi everyone,

After getting the main bearings and hardware finished I wanted to address the crankshaft lubrication. Not wanting to use off the shelf lubricators I chose to model the Lunkenheimer Tiger #1 grease cup. I have always liked the looks of this cup and have a few NOS ones on the shelf for a full sized engine restoration project.

I decided on using 3/16 MTP for the threads and after a little head scratching, and measuring I decided that .35 scale would work out pretty good. So here is the construction of my 1/3 scale Lunk. grease cups.

It would be nice to say this was an afternoon project but I messed around with them for the better part of two days.


Here is one of the finished cups along with the pattern.


And here is another view.


First all the diameters of the body were turned and the MTP threads cut using a die in a tailstock die holder.


Then the body was transferred to the mill and the hex cut using a spin indexer.


Back in the lathe the 20 degree bevel is cut on the bottom of the hex using a boring bar.


Now the 1/2-36 threads are single point threaded.


The bodies were parted off a little long then re-chucked in a 9/32? collet.


After facing to length a counter bore is drilled to match the prototype.


The cap was turned, bored, knurled and single point threaded all in one setup.


Then they were parted off a little long.


Using the body as a mandrel and screwing the cap up against the collet the caps were faced to length and the chamfer cut.

Not shown; the cap was drilled and a dummy rivet installed. This rivet holds a spring detent on the full sized cup.

Here is a pair of the finished cups ready for service.


And one last shot of them installed on the engine.

I'm working on engraving the lettering on the top of the cup but haven't had time to work it into the schedule yet; I'm hoping to use a drag engraver on the CNC mill either with a diamond or carbide tip. The tooling is available I just need to get the CAD done and engrave some test pieces to see how it works out.


Here is a shot of the lettering on the cup.
 

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 01:05:47 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline ths

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Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #74 on: February 03, 2013, 06:36:21 AM »
Hi Dave,

I'm really enjoying this build, the staggered depth bearing caps, in fact all to do with the bearings are a joy to behold.

My one question is, will you be using oil or grease in the greasers, and does it matter which? (sorry, two questions!).

Hugh.