Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176561 times)

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #465 on: September 10, 2016, 04:31:20 PM »
Hey Eric, thanks for checking in.

The tank parts have been punched out and folded up; I decided to make the outer shell from two pieces as it would have been difficult to do it in one piece on our press brake with available tooling.

The bottom in recessed so the rivets are not in the water space. To hopefully make assemble easier; I chose to install rails around the rim of the tank that will be riveted in place. This will give the top something to sit on and when completely assembled will appear that the top has been riveted in place.


Tank Shell, rails and mounting feet. The feet are made from heavier .06” material.


Tank rear panel, top and bottom.




The corners were filled in with some silicon bronze using a TIG welder. I’m not the best welder around so my coworker did this for me.




If you are wondering about the extra set of holes in the bottom they are because I decided after I had punched out the parts I wanted to increase the size of the bottom outlet flange. The flange will cover the smaller hole circle. I also added a second flange the well serve as the water return from the engine.

Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #466 on: September 10, 2016, 05:32:45 PM »
Wow Dave, you already have a lot of it done!!  Looks great so far too!

Bill

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #467 on: September 10, 2016, 08:32:49 PM »
I'm keeping my eyes on you pal. :lolb: I'm thinking with that many rivets properly set,  no solder may be needed.  Maybe just a fine line of JB before you set the rivets :shrug:.

Cletus

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #468 on: September 11, 2016, 08:48:44 AM »
Cletus,
 Thanks for the tip! :ThumbsUp: hadn't thought to use JB weld to seal the tank seams, it's got be easier than solder.....providing it doesn't go off too quick! It looks like it has finally come available here

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline stevehuckss396

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #469 on: September 11, 2016, 10:50:36 AM »


Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave

With another flange inside the tank and a piece of tubing bent to suit, you can have the water return to anywhere you would like.
Do not be like the cat who wanted a fish but was afraid to get his paws wet.

Offline Ian S C

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #470 on: September 11, 2016, 01:55:43 PM »
I still solder spouting,  for the joint I drill it for steel Pop rivets, tin the joint, rivet up then sweat the joint. Plumbers, and roofers these days just use rivets and RTV.
I seem to remember that the old galvanised water tanks had angle iron in the corners, and flat plates (probably around 10 to 12SWG) riveted on the angle.  The lid about 18" dia cast iron disc, locks with a short turn into the cast iron hole in the tank.
Ian S C

Offline maury

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #471 on: September 11, 2016, 02:01:41 PM »
Dave, exceptional sheet metal work, or did you CNC those parts? Very nice.

Lost my computer so I've been off the grid for a while.

maury
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Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #472 on: September 11, 2016, 04:41:35 PM »


Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave

With another flange inside the tank and a piece of tubing bent to suit, you can have the water return to anywhere you would like.

Hi Steve
That would be a good option. My initial plan was to tee the engine water return into the pump supply line under the display base. The pump would have most likely been able to suck air in do to the way I had planed to plumb the engine. There will be an open funnel on the engine where you will be able to see the water leave the engine and trickle into the funnel on a stand pipe. This is the way a lot of the large stationary engines were plumbed.
I think by just by giving the engine return water its own entry point will solve this problem.

Maury; Yes the sheet metal parts were punched out on our CNC punch at work and also folded up on our CNC press brake. The punch in an interesting beast to program and run. It sure is nice to be able to have access to this equipment for personal projects.

Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #473 on: September 19, 2016, 02:16:58 AM »
Hi everyone.
Work continues on the water tank.


A set of brass flanges were made; two of them go in the bottom of the tank. One serves as a supply to the pump and the other is a cooling water return from the engine. The third is for the tank drain valve.


Starting the assembly; the rails that support the tank top are riveted in place. The copper rivets were annealed and pickled in Muriatic acid, then cut to length using a wood chisel in a fixture. Setting tools were made (and modified more than once) to set all the rivets in the tank.


The four rails have been riveted in place; along with the upper rivets for the mounting feet.


The two flanges located on the tank bottom have been riveted in place.


Here is a shot of the other side.


Next the drain flange was installed.


Next in line was the rear tank panel.


Here is an inside shot of the set rivets; once they’re covered in solder and the tank top installed this side (hopefully) will never be seen again.


The galvannealed steel was not as easy to solder as I had hoped. I think it goes through some post treatments that make it good for painting but not soldering. I picked up a small brick of Sal Ammoniac that made tinning it possible.


I found that the soldering went better if the joints were tinned before assembly. I was able to get the rails and corners soldered after some experimenting; but I needed to come up with a better plan for the tank bottom. Pre-tinning was the solution. Each inside surface along with each mating surface on the tank bottom were pre-tined prior to assembly.


The tank just after soldering the bottom in and before any clean up; all the solder joints except for the top are inside the tank and won’t show after assembly.


The best part is that doesn’t leak! :whoohoo:


Thanks for checking in.
Dave


« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 02:42:40 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline Kim

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #474 on: September 19, 2016, 05:57:53 AM »
Beautiful work, as always, Dave.  And your rivets look simply stunning!  I don't know how you do it.  Can you post a picture of the setting tools you made? I'd love to see the tools you used, how many, etc.

It looks great and doesn't leak! What more could you ask for? :)
Kim

Offline maury

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #475 on: September 19, 2016, 12:58:41 PM »
Dave, incredible workmanship! I'm trying to get a sense of the size, is it about 6" x10" x8" high?
I hope to see your Pacific project at NAMES next spring, it'll be a great hit.

maury
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Offline Rivergypsy

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #476 on: September 19, 2016, 01:15:16 PM »
More stunning work, Dave - well done!!

(think I need to work harder on my riveting...  :-[ )

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #477 on: September 19, 2016, 07:49:06 PM »
Hi Dave, great job and perfect as always.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #478 on: September 20, 2016, 12:31:00 AM »
Every rivet is just perfect...amazing work Dave. The whole tank just looks fantastic!!

Bill

Offline Art K

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #479 on: September 20, 2016, 01:59:58 AM »
Dave,
I have to say that tank looks great, and I'm glad I didn't make it cause it wouldn't look nearly as good. I still have a partially complete chip tray on my lathe, and it doesn't need to hold water, only chips. :wallbang:
Art
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