Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176557 times)

Offline Kim

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #360 on: January 30, 2016, 05:49:53 PM »
Just amazing work there Dave!  Thanks for sharing.
I'm also fascinated by your soft jaws.  Did you tell us about that and I just slept through that part? Looks pretty neat.
Kim

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #361 on: January 30, 2016, 08:28:23 PM »
Hi Dave, an impressive clamping concept is shown there.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline kvom

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #362 on: January 30, 2016, 09:21:47 PM »
My supposition is that he did a 3D model of the casting and then used the model itself to model negative half molds in each jaw.  Then 3D printed the two jaws.  I know you can do this in Solidworks.

There's a more quick and dirty technique I've been wanting to try.  I have a jar of plastic beads called PolyMold.  These melt at the temperature of boiling water into a gel that can be molded around a part.  Upon cooling it retains its shape.  So I'd take aluminum vise jaws and drill holes for a pair of pins; these keep the plastic from moving in the jaws when cool.   Mold the plastic  around the pins as well as the part.

When I saw this plastic demonstrated on youtube, it was used to clamp a thin knife blade.  When clamped the guy in the video picked up the knife by the handle and lifted the vise with it.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #363 on: January 30, 2016, 11:22:50 PM »
Thanks guys, for all the nice comments and following along with my rather slow progress; I really appreciate the support.
Another fine example of swarfless machining,  however,  I did spot a few flakes in a couple of the pics  :slap:. . BTW, the hand is way too clean  :stir:. Are the printed soft jaws split to clamp the part or what holds the part in them? Also, what's the procedure for using the Interapid to pick up a center punch mark?  Good to see you keeping busy and back on the build. 

Cletus
Eric; might have been an optical illusion here, I was just sweeping the OD of the boss to find the center.


Never knew that sintered material ever existed.  Did you get it from a metal supplier or did you cannibalize it from something else?

Vince
Vince I知 not exactly sure what you are asking here. Are you referring to the brass castings or the soft jaw material?


Dave, excellent work. Those oilers really look nice.

Is Roland selling those castings? I'd like a few for my Pacific build.

Also, could you give some details on the thread milling? I think you are using BobCam, I've been wanting to do a bit of thread milling myself. What kind of tool path are you using?

maury
Maury I知 still using Bob CAD so I would think the tool paths would be similar to your program; I guess I知 assuming your version supports thread milling? It痴 really pretty easy to just go through the wizard and fill in the blanks. I cut top down so it would be climb milling. I did have to tweak the depth of thread to get a nice fit; but ended up being pretty close to the published depth for that pitch. Probably has some to do with the flat on the tip of the thread mill.

I知 not exactly sure what Roland痴 plans are at this point (or if there are any); will have to check and see.

Nice work.

For the diagonal plugged hole, why not a straight hole from the bottom that intersects both the slanted passage and the main cross passage?

If you want 1/16-NPT threads to be thread milled, a tool from onlinecarbide.com is not expensive.

Kirk; as usual for me I知 just trying to follow what the original manufacture did. The oil needs to be presented to the back side of the stop valve so that is can be shut off. If you were simply to drill up from the bottom into the sight glass area how would the stop valve be able to shut off the oil flow? You can see the tapered seat in the cutaway where the stop valve seats.

Thanks for the tip on the thread mills; I will file that away. There has been times in the past where I could have used one for 1/8 NPT. The 1/16 would be too large for this project. シ MTP would be just right; that痴 why I decided to just go with the シ-32 straight thread.



Here are a couple shots of the soft jaws



Kirk hit the nail on the head; I copied the 3d body casting and placed each one in space where I wanted it; then created the two jaw plates over the top of the casting models. By not merging any of the bodies I ended up with 6 separate bodies. Then the castings were used as tools to cut the cavities in the jaw plates.

The jaws were run on a SLA (Stereo Lithography machine). The SLA is uses a laser to cure liquid resin and is much more accurate than most FDM type 3d printers.

Thanks again everyone,
Dave

Offline kuhncw

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #364 on: January 31, 2016, 04:09:05 PM »
Dave,

Thank you for spending the time to post such a detailed build thread.  Your photos really help show how you make setups for the machine work.

Perhaps I've missed it, but what camera and lighting are you using.

Chuck

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #365 on: February 01, 2016, 01:18:20 AM »
Hi Chuck

Thanks for the kind words.

In the first part of the Pacific build I was using a Cannon point and shoot digital camera. I received a Nikon Coolpix P530 last year as a 35 year anniversary gift from my employer; I just love it and It's macro capabilities are great. I turn off my machine task lamps for shots on the machines and never use flash. The camera does a good job of dealing with the florescent lighting; but with no flash it ends up with a very slow shutter speed (1/30 sec). so I usually try to brace the camera against something to help keep it steady. I need to do what Stan did and make an adapter for my magnetic base.

I also use Infran View (a free program) to crop and resize my pictures before posting.

Thanks again for the nice comments.
Dave
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 02:02:42 AM by Dave Otto »

Offline kuhncw

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #366 on: February 02, 2016, 02:10:33 AM »
Dave,

Thanks for the information.

Chuck

Offline RolandMM

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #367 on: February 04, 2016, 06:06:52 PM »
Maury, these are exactly the oilers that should be on your Pacific.

We have given thought to making a kit for our 4-post oiler.  The only parts not already in your scrap box are the casting and the glass.  With plans and proper tools, a patient, careful machinist could produce spectacular oilers for his engine.

Morrison and Marvin (http://www.morrisonandmarvin.com/)  has been offering an exact Quarter Scale copy of the American #2 oiler ever since the Quarter Scale GADE became available.  To make the glass for this oiler it was decided to use acrylic tube but it was not available in the correct size.  We solved that by purchasing a tube with the correct ID and machining the OD, then re-polishing the acrylic so it was clear.

This 4-post oiler caused us to rethink how scale oilers are made.  Glass must be used because it looks like it should.  We special ordered a very thin Pyrex tube and bought a diamond saw to cut it square.

We are going to machine a very limited amount of 4-post oilers for our own engines because they are so time extensive with all the tiny parts and tight tolerances.  This will be a one time run and if some are left over we would be inclined to sell them.  The rest of you may want to build your own after Dave finishes the drawings.  This would be an ideal project for the Mini Lathe machinists.

I will attach a picture of the American #2 Oiler so you can compare the simplicity against the 4-post oiler.

Roland

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Offline RolandMM

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #368 on: March 13, 2016, 06:44:15 PM »
Dave, since you have had so much fun making brass chips, pretty soon you will need some glass tube for the reservoir.

Lacking equipment and experience with glass I proceeded to treat this special order thinwall Pyrex tube like a bar of hard steel and cut it with a rough diamond wheel..  After cleaning up the shards I ordered a nylon 5C collet and bored it to 5/8 diameter to fit the tube.

Then I obtained a fine diamond saw blade that is .010 thick and adapted it, by making flanges, to my toolpost grinder.  Then with slow feed and application of water, results were much better.  I cut more glass than you have castings so now you have no excuse.

Roland
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Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #369 on: March 14, 2016, 12:11:03 AM »
Roland,

Nice work on the glass cutting apparatus; I understand that cutting Pyrex tubing isn't always as easy as it may seem. Looking forward to getting the glass for my oilers.
I have made good progress on them and need to carve out some time to post an update.

Dave


Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #370 on: March 29, 2016, 02:50:55 AM »
Hi Guys
While Max has been making good progress on his Otto & Langen I have been continuing to work on the oilers; I have been making some good progress and need to try to catch up on my updates.

After finishing the lower end of the oiler bodies it was time to start working on the upper end. There are several areas to deal with here. The bosses for the metering valve and lower plate need to be threaded. The drip tube needs to be machined and pressed in place and the ports for the vent tube also need to be added.

Below is a cut away drawing that shows how involved this part of the machine work is. You can see how the oil would flow down through the port behind the metering valve. Then down through the metering valve when opened and into the drip tube.


Parts that are pressed in are colored in red; the drip tube and the vent plug. The drip tube had to be machined and pressed in place before the metering valve hole could be put in.


Here are the drip tubes before being pressed into the oiler bodies.


Here is a shot of the plugs for the vent port. If you look at the cut away drawing you can see the cross hole the is sealed by the threads of the lower plate. The original casting had some coring that would have been rather difficult at this scale. But they did do some rather fancy drilling to get it all to line up and work.


Three holes in the top of the oiler body have been drilled; the one on the right feeds the oil down to the metering valve. The center one is where the vent tube will be installed and the one on the left is where the vent was drilled down into the sight glass area.


One of the .046 plugs is carefully started.


Then a little Loctite is added for good measure and the plug is pressed down flush with the oiler body.



Here are the oiler bodies with all the machine work completed; only the vent tubes need to be made and installed.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Offline yogi

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #371 on: March 29, 2016, 04:37:33 AM »
Very impressive work Dave!  :ThumbsUp:
Those are some tiny little parts. This is watchmaking territory! 8)
Fantastic! Thanks for sharing.

Online Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #372 on: March 29, 2016, 05:05:10 AM »
Just like your nuts, just beautiful work Dave........ :cheers:

Don

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #373 on: March 29, 2016, 06:11:36 AM »
Hi Dave, fantastic and really small.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #374 on: March 30, 2016, 12:17:34 AM »
Yogi, Don, and Achim; thanks for checking in and the nice comments I appreciate them.

Work continues with the upper and lower plates for the glass. Zee is going to give me hell because I forgot to take any pictures of the first operation. Pretty simple really just some turning and boring and part it off. During the 1st operation the hole was drilled with a シ carbide spot drill which happens to be the correct size for the 9/32-32 thread.


The plate was turned around and held in a collet; then the tap was run through. Also the hole is counter bored slightly for clearance as was the original. This is because the thread doesn稚 got clear to the bottom on the mating parts.



The plate is faced to proper thickness and a radius tool is used to form the contour. There is a little blend between the large radius and the top; it was carefully filed and sanded in.



The lower plates were screwed and Loctited to the body casting. Care was taken to insure the vent ports did not get plugged with Loctite. After the Loctite had set the soft jaws were used to hold the assembly for machining the profile and drilling the holes. A left hand helix end mill was used to keep from unscrewing the plate from the casting.



For the upper plates a mandrill was turned up and held in a V block.



The blank was held onto the mandrill with a cap screw and washer.



The left hand end mill was also used here to machine the profile.



Here is a shot of the bodies as they are today.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave