Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 176575 times)

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #345 on: January 06, 2016, 01:03:59 AM »
Thanks Zee and  Don

Don, Yes it is kind of a valve; they are the lower castings for a 4 post drip oiler. If you go back to about post #328 that is where it all started.

Dave

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #346 on: January 06, 2016, 01:06:11 AM »
Yea I remember now, it has been a while so forgive me.

Don

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #347 on: January 06, 2016, 01:09:44 AM »
Those do look very nice Dave. Good detail too!! Hope they machine as well as they look but can't imagine why they wouldn't...keep us posted.

Bill
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 02:19:14 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #348 on: January 06, 2016, 08:49:52 AM »
Some really nice castings. Very well done.
Kind Regards
Achim

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #349 on: January 06, 2016, 11:47:05 PM »
Achim & Bill thanks for the nice comments and continuing to follow along.


A while back I made the flame arrestor housing for my engine based on patent drawings. The difference between mine and the original is Im using sintered bronze for the elements instead of stacked screens.


The idea behind the arrestor is that if a flame passes through due to a backfire there is a huge amount of surface area that the flame needs to work its way through. This will cool the flame to the point that it can no longer sustain combustion and goes out.


Wayne Grenning did some testing of this type of material when he built the vapor carburetor for the Daimler experimental engine that he restored. He literally had combustible vapor being pushed out of the carburetor and burning. The sintered elements kept the fire from working its way back into the carburetor. This test was filmed from a safe distance and the fire was lit remotely. This was after many hours of work went into creating the carburetor; he was will to risk all his work because he wanted to be sure that it would be safe to run indoors around people.

My system will actually have 3 separate elements. Two in the arrestor and one in the check valve assembly which has not been completed yet. So here a few pictures of completing the flame arrestor.



First the body parts were bored for a press fit of the sintered material.


Pair of pneumatic mufflers were chosen to be the donors for the elements.


The mufflers were parted off to the proper length.


Then pressed into the upper and lower housings. When the housing is screwed together there is a space between the two elements.

This build is probably going to start jumping around somewhat because Im working on different things at the same time; trying to get this project running and finished.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave

Offline smfr

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #350 on: January 07, 2016, 01:45:12 AM »
That's an interesting use of a neat material! Still following, and admiring your work, Dave.

Simon

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #351 on: January 30, 2016, 01:09:44 AM »
Hi Guys

Thanks for checking in Simon, I appreciate it.

I have been trying to get an update posted recently and extra time has been pretty hard to come by. I have made a little progress on the oilers; and have some pictures to share. Not the greatest photos but hopefully ok.

I designed and printed a couple sets of soft jaws that would cover all the different operations on the oiler castings.


First up the large hole where the sight glass retainers fit, needed to tapped. I dropped a 7/32 end mill in the cored hole to true it up then followed with a #2 reamer and then tapped 1/4-32 all the way through.
The cored holes were slightly oval and the end mill helped get things round enough that I could them ream them.


Brass sleeves were turned and pressed into the threaded holes; a stepped mandrill was turned and used to press the sleeves and insure they were centered from side to side in the bore. After pressing, a little drop of wicking Loctite was added on each side to help seal everything up.


Here are the castings after installing the sleeves. The sleeves kept me from having to thread up to the shoulder.


Here is a cutaway of my CAD model showing the next challenge. A port needs to added between the sight glass area and the back side of the stop valve. The port will be drilled from the bottom of the stop valve boss up into the sight glass area. Then a brass plug pressed in fill the hole.


The soft jaws hold the casting at the proper angle for drilling. The hole was spotted with a 1/16 end mill to make a small flat; then center drilled and drilled.


Roland sent me a few of these brass rivets that were just the right size to plug the hole drilled with a #53 drill bit. The rivets were annealed to hopefully keep the drill from wondering when the stop valve hole was drilled.


I had calculated the exact length needed to pretty much fill the hole and after drilling would leave the short passage open. I wanted to get as much material in the port as possible to keep the drill from wondering as it passed through. I decided to leave the rivets long so there was something to hang on to. A small line was cut in the lathe so I would know how far to insert the plug; also the oxides were polished off at this time.


Here are the installed plugs. I was able to grab the rivet in the vise and wiggle the casting on to it; making sure to stop when the line contacted the casting. Loctite was also added to the plug before pressing it into place.


A pair of side cutters were used to nip off the excess plug material.


Then carefully belt sanded close to the casting. Using a magnifier and needle files the plugs were filed to the original contour of the castings.


Time to set some tools for the next two operations.


Again the soft jaws were used to hold the casting at the proper angle so the stop valve boss was square to the world. The center of the feature was indicated in and the tools set to the top of the part.


I was having so much fun I forgot to take any pictures. The boss was center drilled, then drilled with two different diameters; one that goes all the way to the vertical center of the casting and the larger diameter that get tapped and also forms the seat for the valve. By looking at the CAD cutaway you can see that the depth of the seat needs to be held pretty close as there is not much wiggle room there.
The boss was also chamfered and the threads milled on at this time. I had the CNC stop centered over the hole and the last step was to put a spring loaded center in the spindle and tap the 3-48 threads for the stop valve.


The next operation was to finish the pipe threads and lower port where the oil comes out. The first operation was to drive around the boss with an end mill to square up the small radius left from the mold. Then the chamfer was milled.


The port was spotted and drilled. Again the drill depth needed to be correct and required a little tweaking of the code to get it spot on. I actually did both operations on a couple parts (stop valve boss and lower boss) to make sure the holes were going to come out correctly. I was quite happy when they came out just like my CAD model.


The next step was to mill the threads; I decided to go with -32 straight threads as my CAM program wont generate tapered threads. I fiddled with the thread depth until I got a nice fit on some of the PM Research cast fittings.


This is where Im at so far on the oilers. Im pleased with how things are progressing. Next I need to start thinking about the features of the upper section of the castings.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave


Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #352 on: January 30, 2016, 01:19:13 AM »
Your work always amazes me.

What are the soft jaws made of? You say they were printed. ABS?

I was having so much fun I forgot to take any pictures.

Oh? Oh really? Nah...I won't say anything.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline yogi

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #353 on: January 30, 2016, 01:23:18 AM »
Great work!!! Very inspiring!   :ThumbsUp:
Thank you very much for sharing.  :cheers:

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #354 on: January 30, 2016, 01:46:19 AM »
Another fine example of swarfless machining,  however,  I did spot a few flakes in a couple of the pics  :slap:. . BTW, the hand is way too clean  :stir:. Are the printed soft jaws split to clamp the part or what holds the part in them? Also, what's the procedure for using the Interapid to pick up a center punch mark?  Good to see you keeping busy and back on the build. 

Cletus

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #355 on: January 30, 2016, 05:15:39 AM »
Never knew that sintered material ever existed.  Did you get it from a metal supplier or did you cannibalize it from something else?

Vince

Offline maury

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #356 on: January 30, 2016, 12:36:49 PM »
Dave, excellent work. Those oilers really look nice.

Is Roland selling those castings? I'd like a few for my Pacific build.

Also, could you give some details on the thread milling? I think you are using BobCam, I've been wanting to do a bit of thread milling myself. What kind of tool path are you using?

maury
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Offline kvom

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #357 on: January 30, 2016, 01:01:33 PM »
Nice work.

For the diagonal plugged hole, why not a straight hole from the bottom that intersects both the slanted passage and the main cross passage?

If you want 1/16-NPT threads to be thread milled, a tool from onlinecarbide.com is not expensive.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #358 on: January 30, 2016, 01:11:20 PM »
Dave, interesting use of 3D printing for that fixture. Looks to have worked out very well too. Those are nice looking parts.

Bill

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #359 on: January 30, 2016, 04:11:01 PM »
Dave your way to cool buddy. A great example of using soft jaws to manipulate material for working on it. Very nice work buddy and I agree with Cletus, your hands are way to clean. ....... :praise2:

Don