Author Topic: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips  (Read 39138 times)

Offline Thayer

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Re: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips
« Reply #105 on: May 02, 2013, 01:31:33 PM »
Thanks guys.

One thing I realized last night after posting was that between the good and nearly good parts I could make a save on the smaller bearing support by doing actual split bearings. Hadn't expected to do so, but who knows what depravity will infest my mind before I am done.

Offline gary.a.ayres

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Re: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips
« Reply #106 on: February 02, 2020, 11:00:27 PM »
Some beautiful miniature architecture on display in this thread. Some say Victorian but to my eye it's postmodern. Really, really nice.

But you were on such a roll with both the machining and the posting that I was surprised by the abrupt stop, way back in 2013.

Will take a look and see what else you have posted...


Offline Thayer

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Re: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips
« Reply #107 on: December 05, 2020, 01:49:55 PM »
Gary,

Thanks for your kind words. Alas, life has been rather disruptive since my last post, and while I have all good intentions of getting back to wrap up this project, I have not touched it in years. Honestly, what brought me back to the thread this time was seeing one of my photos on my suggested pinterest feed a few days ago, for which I believe I can thank you.

If I can recall correctly, I believe that at the time the repeated failures with the bearing columns was most frustrating, and let me set it aside for long enough to get distracted by something else, and then the other excuses started flowing. Not the least of which was being away from here long enough to forget my log-in info, and for some reason I am not getting the email messages about how to reset it. Fortunately I finally figured it out this morning.

Most recently I have been watching Joe Pieczynski build a PM research engine on youtub (link below) and have been quite impressed by his talents. Since his project is a fancied up cast version of Elmer's #33, I couldn't help but think that maybe it is time again.

Thayer

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpp6lgdc_XO_FZYJppaFa5w/featured

« Last Edit: December 05, 2020, 02:26:00 PM by Thayer »

Offline propforward

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Re: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips
« Reply #108 on: December 05, 2020, 05:56:22 PM »
Good to see you back Thayer. I totally understand your frustrations - sometimes a bit of a break is OK so that you can come back with a fresh perspective.

I am also a fan of Joe Pie - I am building the same engine, so it's very useful for me to see his techniques. Joe is the real deal - he's a machinist who makes things to make money, and he knows what he is talking about. There are too many youtube amateurs who post "tutorials", but who do not have the real world experience and knowledge to really claim that what they are doing is right.

Anyway - onwards and upwards!
« Last Edit: December 05, 2020, 07:11:02 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline Thayer

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Re: Elmer's #33 - a novice makes chips
« Reply #109 on: December 05, 2020, 06:58:44 PM »
Thanks Propforward, it is certainly good to be back.

One issue that I am facing is that all the CAD work that I did for this engine is gone. Both the computer, and the backup. So I will need to reverse engineer some stuff. Fortunately I still have my Elmer's docs, and the g code from my mill, so should be able to piece it back together enough to move forward again.

Normally I watch a lot of You Tube stuff at accelerated rates, but find with Joe I need to watch at actual speed, and often back up, to fully comprehend what he is doing and why. Great content, with, as you suggest, a solid foundation based on his decades of feeding his family with his skills.