Author Topic: Moon Clock  (Read 846 times)

Offline wagnmkr

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Moon Clock
« on: March 27, 2024, 12:03:59 PM »
The first clock just keeps on ticking so it has encouraged me to try another.

The "Moon Clock" version by the the same designer is out and ready to go, so I have made a start with colour experiments on the moon dial. I can do another color change if I like, right near the end of the printing, to pick out a bit of the texture on the moon surfaces. I don't know yet what I will end up with, but it will be fun.

This is a large clock, being 24" tall and 12 or so inches wide.

 :cheers:



I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Online Kim

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2024, 02:28:09 PM »
Sounds like this will be a fun project!  :popcorn: :popcorn:

Kim

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2024, 09:56:29 PM »
Kim, I am looking forward to getting at this. I am reading the assembly notes again to get a better idea of how it all works.

 :cheers:
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline Krypto

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2024, 11:51:16 PM »
Looking forward to it!
My Workshop Blog:  https://doug.sdf.org/

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2024, 09:14:02 AM »
Thanks Krypto.
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline gerritv

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2024, 12:24:43 PM »
That's a lot of fiddly trimming to do, will it not print without the rim?
I use a glue stick to encourage adhesion to bed. Once the bed cools down the print pops off the glass easily.
gerrit
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Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2024, 12:38:36 PM »
Gerrit, the trimming is not bad but I do sometimes struggle with adhesion. I have never tried the glue stick thing. Which one seems to work best?

I usually use high hold hairspray.

There are a lot of large pieces in this clock so I wouldn't want to do multiples of too many of them because they lifted.

 :cheers:
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2024, 07:30:23 PM »
The Filament itself also has quite an influence on things.
Latest batch of PETG from Prusa is very hard to get off the Build-Plate - but I often had the same problem as you before that ....

Prusa has admittedly also upgraded the Filament Settings for the Prusa-Slicer lately and (not sure) believe that they have increased the Temperature - both of the Build-Plate and the Nozzle ....

So I can honnestly not say for sure what had the most influence - but no more glue here  ;D

Per   :cheers:

Offline gerritv

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2024, 01:45:48 AM »
Latest brand is Elmer's. Prior I used Dollar store stuff but not happy with that.

gerrit
Don't confuse activity with progress

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2024, 10:19:31 AM »
Thanks Per. I have been trying raising the temps as well and I am getting some better results, but still not what I need.

Gerrit, I got some of the Elmer's when I was out yesterday. I did one of the problematic parts with it, and it looks very promising.

I mainly use Creality pla because I can get it locally and it is in theory, a decent filament. The designer of the clocks recommends plain pla because although some of the other filaments are a bit stronger, they are also, for the most part, more flexible. This clock will have at least 8lbs hanging on it so it has to resist the urge to stretch.

Fingers crossed!

 :cheers:
« Last Edit: March 30, 2024, 11:06:43 AM by wagnmkr »
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2024, 12:46:03 PM »
Just a quick note to say Thanks to Per and Gerrit for the advice and info. I did get some Elmers (disappearing purple it says) and have now done several problem parts with no problems so far. It isn't a big deal to apply the glue.

In checking my machines (Ender3 S1 Pro, and an Ender7), I see that the build plate insulation does not cover the bottom of the entire build plate. The outer inch or two are bare, and I assume, susceptible to drafts. I guess I will look at building a box to go around them. I only have problems with the larger prints.

 :cheers:









0)
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2024, 09:49:31 PM »
I use the Elmer's glue stick for parts that refuse to stick to the build plate.  You'll want to periodically clean the glue residue off the build plate, isopropyl alcohol seems to work best for me.

An alternative to building a box around the uninsulated parts of the build plate would be to insulate them.

I'm in the process of designing/building a burnout furnace to do investment casting, and while I was ordering the refractory blanket that I will need I found out that the ceramic fiber insulation board wasn't too expensive - so I ordered some.  A 10-pack of 11"x12" sheets cost me less than USD $23 delivered to my door.  The stuff is 1/8" thick and cuts with a pair of scissors or a utility knife.  And it could also be used for insulating model boilers, since it's good for 2300░F.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2024, 10:50:25 PM »
What would one use to stick that material onto the build plate?

 I had the same sort of idea but I couldn't find any. Never thought of foundry supplies. I will see if I can find some as that could solve the problem.

So far, my using the Elmers has worked a treat and four problem pieces are now done.

 :cheers:
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2024, 10:01:08 PM »
Kapton tape is probably what's sticking the insulation onto the build plate now.  It's available in various widths on-line, for use in high-heat applications.  You'd have to leave 5-10mm gap around the edges of the build plate un-insulated - so that you'd have a place to stick the tape to the bed.  Fortunately, other than the weight of the insulation there's no real stress on the tape.

Another more permanent option would be to use a sodium silicate solution, also known as water glass, to glue the insulation to the build plate.  That option would be a little too permanent for my tastes, you'd have to scrape everything off if you ever needed to work on the bed heater.

The glue stick is usually my last option.  If cleaning the bed, and/or using a brim doesn't keep the part stuck down, the glue stick will.  Sometimes it'll stick a little too well and I wind up having to scrape/pry the part off the print bed.

This is the insulation that I got. https://www.ebay.com/itm/386450837939
« Last Edit: April 02, 2024, 10:05:48 PM by ddmckee54 »

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Moon Clock
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2024, 11:14:28 PM »
Thank You for that information. I will look into it.

The glue stick is working better than anything else at the moment. These large gears don't have a lot of substance to them and curl easily.

Yes, sometimes the glue works too well but I have found that if I just let the bed cool right off (Ender7), the part will pop off, and the Ender3 has a flexible bed plate so if I just lift the front of it slightly, the part pops right off.

As long as I get this set of gears printed, I will be a happy bunny.

 :cheers:
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

 

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