Author Topic: Synchronome Clock build  (Read 286 times)

Offline gerritv

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Synchronome Clock build
« on: February 12, 2024, 01:42:30 AM »
I was given a frame casting for this clock in early 2022. It was cast in the 1960's by members of TSME in Toronto.

Casting was a bit twisty so it was mounted to MDF with spacers, and then best guesses made for milling and drilling the various holes. I used an article by Eliot Isaacs from the BHJ but later on was given the matching drawings for the casting (more or less matching).
I made all of the threaded hardware, using BA taps, dies and my Rocketronics ELS where possible. Everything else was cut with a piercing saw and filed to shape. A bit tedious but surprisingly theraputic.
I also made a rope knurl using the traditional tap against a steel blank methond, in this case a 6-32 tap.

Presently waiting for some more red oak and also warm weather to build the case in garage. Drawings for a repeater are also in the works.

Gerrit
« Last Edit: February 12, 2024, 05:43:18 PM by gerritv »
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Offline uuu

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Re: Synchronome Clock build
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2024, 08:35:50 AM »
I'm following this one with interest.  I have a horrible one, where the frame is fabricated rather than cast - and in a dreadful case.  Yours is going to be so much better.

Wilf

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Synchronome Clock build
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2024, 11:38:01 AM »
A very interesting project ... I'll be following as well.

 :cheers:
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sewn up all wrong!

Offline gerritv

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Re: Synchronome Clock build
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2024, 05:42:39 PM »
I'm following this one with interest.  I have a horrible one, where the frame is fabricated rather than cast - and in a dreadful case.  Yours is going to be so much better.

Wilf
Way back Synchronome used to sell casting kits, with or without the frame. I imaging the brass castings were rough and difficult to pretty up. Chapter 6 of Electric Clocks and Chimes gives instructions for that build.
ME had a few articles as well using a built frame, e.g. Bladzell 3342 from 1968.
It shouldn't be too difficult to tidy up your clock, nothing is very precise (dimensions are in fractions afterall). Making new srews etc and some finishing should help a lot.

I surprised myself with how fussy I got over the time of the build with maintaining square edges instead of the usual bevels we like on engines. And graining instead of polishing.

Gerrit
« Last Edit: February 12, 2024, 05:47:56 PM by gerritv »
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Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Synchronome Clock build
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2024, 09:12:19 PM »
How does it work  :thinking:

I'm kind of guessing that the Electromagnets are the power source (for the movement), the Escapement controls time and the switches are controling the electric current to the magnets. So the remotes are controlled by the same switches or ...?

Just currious  ;)

Per        :cheers:

Offline gerritv

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Re: Synchronome Clock build
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2024, 10:42:15 PM »
More or less.
 the pendulum moves the count wheel (escapement wheel) once per second on the return flight. Every 30 seconds a trip arm connected to the count wheel drops the L shaped Gravity Arm. That adds impulse to the pendulum to keep its energy level up. When the Gravity Arm drops all the way it makes an electrical connetion that a) energizes the electromagnets to return the Gravity Arm to its waiting spot, b) sends an impulse to the repeater clock mechanisms.

It should run for months on a 6v battery, even if driving 15 or more repeaters.

This type of clock was used (there are several variations of design depending on country and date) in post offices and train stations as well as office buildings from the late 1800's into the 1960's.

https://wp.clockdoc.org/wp-content/uploads/Synchronome-1907-standard-switch.mp4

gerrit
« Last Edit: February 12, 2024, 11:13:25 PM by gerritv »
Don't confuse activity with progress

 

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