Author Topic: Bischoff No. 204  (Read 493 times)

Offline Michael S.

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Bischoff No. 204
« on: February 05, 2024, 06:33:26 PM »
Hello everyone,

The next steam engine model I would like to use is the single-cylinder engine from Wilhelm Bischoff No. 204 build.
The model was offered in the 1920s - 1930s. Either as a set of castings or a finished model.
But this time it won't be the case that all the parts have to be manufactured. Nor will it be a 100% replica of the original.
I got the flywheel, small pulley and crankshaft from the junkyard. There was also an eccentricity attached to it.
These are the only original parts for the engine.
The base plate is a cast of an original base plate.
Everything else is made from parts of similar steam engines and has to be adapted. So patchwork but maybe it will work.

Michael

Offline crueby

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2024, 06:39:46 PM »
Thats a very nicely proportioned engine, will be following along here!   :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Roger B

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2024, 06:53:10 PM »
I do like the governor linkage in the first picture  :)
Best regards

Roger

Offline Michael S.

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2024, 07:06:52 PM »
Yes Chris,
a nice little steam engine.
The base plate had already been machined at the top and bottom by a milling machine. But the edges still had to be cleaned with a file and a few threaded holes drilled from below. So that the plate can be screwed onto a wooden plate later.
I have already painted cast iron plates with primer.
There is another photo of all the parts I want to use.
The parts were purchased at exhibitions over time and are not completely finished. But they fit the model quite well. I think the parts come from model makers who started a model but didn't finish it.
I hope this doesn't get too boring here, because there's not a lot of machining left to do with a lathe and milling machine.
It could be a quick build.
So Chris would be ready before noon tomorrow 😁.

Michael

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2024, 07:47:13 PM »
Looks like you are almost done.  :Lol:
That engine has nice lines, looking forward to another one of your builds.

Dave

Offline Michael S.

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2024, 06:26:35 PM »
Today I worked on the crankshaft bearings. There is still a remnant of a broken cast iron bearing block. This remainder was still hanging on the old crankshaft with the flywheel.
It can be seen in the original Bischoff catalog. Almost all bearing blocks are open in the middle. Built as a frame.
The crankshaft bearing I want to use now is a solid block.
I think I'll leave it like that because I don't want it to be a precise restoration. So a little artistic freedom.
I copied two more pages from the catalog. There were a lot of different crankshaft bearings and transmission bearings available to buy. It's a shame that this offer is no longer available today.
I was interested in the prices. What did it cost back then? Unfortunately, the information in Reichsmarks ( RM ) was not entered. It must have been an expensive toy.

Michael
« Last Edit: February 10, 2024, 06:30:29 PM by Michael S. »

Offline Michael S.

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2024, 06:49:51 PM »
So get to the bearing blocks.
The two crankshaft bearings have already been partially machined.
The first thing I noticed was that a threaded hole was not in the correct position. I closed the threaded hole with a brass screw. With Loctite. And a brass wire glued into the lid.
Both bearing blocks had to be milled to the same height.
Then re-drilled the closed hole and cut the M2 thread. When I tested the threaded bolt, the thing actually broke off. 😫
So the whole procedure again.
Now quickly drill the hole for the bearing shells.
But in small steps with several drills and oil.
It almost ripped the part out of the vice. The bronze is very brittle.
In the end they stood peacefully side by side.

Michael

Offline crueby

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2024, 06:58:03 PM »
Coming along nicely. Castings can be tricky things, hard/soft spots, etc.    :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2024, 08:53:11 AM »
I feel your pain when it broke  :'(   :censored:

And it is also a factor in why I don't have anything smaller than M3 in the house ....

Expect to see you make another beauty out of this project (your usual standard)  :cheers:

Per

Offline Michael S.

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2024, 06:13:17 PM »
Thanks Per,  :cheers:

The crankshaft bearings were placed on the base plate for test installation. The footplates are too wide. So I had to make them smaller.
I soldered sleeves onto the holes for the screws to attach to the base plate.
Then the bronze bearing shells and two oilers were made.
The crankshaft bearings are now also treated with paint. (They would also look quite good in their natural color.)

Greetings Michael

Offline Michael S.

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2024, 06:28:36 PM »
Today I built a base for the cylinder. The base consists of 3 brass parts that I soldered with silver solder.
All sides of the base were then machined with the milling machine. Beforehand, I made a small drawing with millimeter paper. I had to determine the exact height of the base.
The exhaust goes down out of the slide box.
I was able to make room for a 6mm pipe elbow. The crosshead guide has a thread on top for the oiler.
The crosshead guide looks a bit too big compared to the cylinder but the insulation that will go around the cylinder later will make it look better.

Michael

Offline crueby

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Re: Bischoff No. 204
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2024, 07:39:02 PM »
Looks great!

 

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