Author Topic: Precision Lathe  (Read 3331 times)

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #45 on: November 22, 2021, 07:28:55 PM »
It is not so much the asking but the way that I quiet often see it being asked. Take post #28 for example effectively saying the person is bad mannered when they simply may not have been able to understand what was being asked is hardly welcoming.

Post #28 from John:

as a machinist having used CNC lathes and mills i have also used lathes and ones with live tooling so would do the milling in the lathe while
the work is set in the lathe and with more modern machines milling in the lathe should be more common with interactive programming
finished parts of the lathe .i don't think the more precision tools are wasted its often more cost and whats available to run in home work shop
with a domestic power supply  I would always mill in the lathe if the machine is available but mostly can not be cause i no longer have access to the machines for industry or  manufacturing these types of machines should be considered .some jobs are better suited to a separate milling machine but for turning and milling lots can be done on the lathe with live tooling.
John

I am at a loss about why you consider John has been bad mannered or is implying the OP might be. John has brought out an interesting point that those of us who do not use CNC would consider to be old fashioned - milling in the lathe.

However this post by the OP:

Why have many people reported defects in the WABECO D4000?

https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=115245

etc. etc.


Does seem to be very direct in their response, which maybe why no one wanted to respond  :shrug: There is a saying: manners maketh a man  ;)

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #46 on: November 22, 2021, 07:41:15 PM »
Sorry meant post #37

Oh and I do still sometimes mill on my lathe even though I have CNC, just use whatever suits the job in hand best. Also regularly use it as a horizontal boring machine. Luckily most of the far eastern machines have a milling friendly cross slide with tee slots.

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #47 on: November 22, 2021, 08:26:56 PM »
Sorry meant post #37

Post #37:

It is good manners to introduce yourself and tell us about your interest in making model engines before you start trying to gain from the members experience and knowledge.

Jo

I apologise to any members who took offense by this post as Jason has done, it was not my intention to offend anyone  :-[

Jo
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Offline Dan Rowe

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #48 on: November 22, 2021, 08:32:51 PM »
It might be helpful to know where in the world you are located. Most folks add their location in the Personal Text box of their Forum Profile.

What other type of work do you plan? You mentioned a lead screw do you want this for power feed or thread cutting or both.

I was the first member to ask about the OP's location and I gave a reason for the question I also asked why a lead screw was important. Nether concern was addressed by the OP.

This makes it hard to answer any questions about a lathe selection, of course, I like talking about lathes so I made another attempt which also was given no response by the OP.

I do not care about being rude for the most part I am an engineer and we are usually not known for polite conversation, but it is not possible to help someone that can or will not answer simple questions.

Oh yeah I have used my milling machine as a lathe and a lathe as a shaper and a mill. Why do they make vertical slides for lathes?

Cheers Dan

ShaylocoDan

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #49 on: November 22, 2021, 08:36:54 PM »
Why do they make vertical slides for lathes?

Cheers Dan

To enable us to do between centres boring  ;D

Jo
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Offline GWRdriver

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #50 on: November 23, 2021, 03:16:10 AM »
I had the same thought, about the lack of mentions of Cowells machines.   I have owned two Cowells of 1980s vintage, the ME90 90mm standard lathe, and the CW90 which is their clock/watchmakers version.  White both these lathes are robust, superbly made, and superbly finished, due to being accustomed to larger conventional lathes I found the ME90 to be difficult to use, in part as Jo mentions, because there's a lot of winding.  I also found the ME90 to be under-powered, or at least unable to transmit the full power of its motor through plastic change-belts.  Replacing belts did little to improve the situation and I no longer own that machine.

The CW90 with Thyristor (variable) drive was (is) equally well made, and IMHO is a considerable improvement over the typical WW-style jeweler's/watchmaker's lathe (such as a Boley.).  A WW-style lathe isn't for everyone of course, but I find them useful for detail parts.  The CW90 accepts WW-style tooling but is substantial enough to support conventional lathe tooling, a 3-jaw chuck for instance, providing it's proportionately small.  They are designed for high speeds so spindle-mounted mass must be kept small.
       

PS: I haven't seen any mention of Cowells lathes in this conversation. Other than what Jo and Bill Lindsey have talked theirs, I know nothing about them.
There used to be a rather long waiting list for a new Cowells lathe, I think Bill mentioned he managed to get his within 6 months of the original order :thinking: They are a very, very nice little lathe  :Love: Little C gets regularly used. Its another of those lathes where the saddle is "fixed" on the lead screw so there can be a lot of winding to move the carriage anywhere.
Jo