Author Topic: Precision Lathe  (Read 3326 times)

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2021, 06:27:12 PM »
 :headscratch:
My focus is on a milling machine (WABECO F1210 HS ISO30), for turning and boring process, sometimes I need a precision lathe. I want to produce small and precision parts for local companies.

It strikes me that you are struggling to articulate your need for a lathe, which is why the other forums couldn't help you. Silly question: what experience do you have using a lathe?

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2021, 06:45:12 PM »
I mean in my work sometimes I need a precision lathe (70% milling and 30% turning) but I don't know how much the mentioned lathes are rigid.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 06:49:53 PM by xzsawq21 »

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2021, 07:07:13 PM »
My Hardinge HLV-H precision lathe has the same turning space as an Emco 10.  I consider the Hardinge to be acceptably rigid for precision work: it weighs 1800 lbs, the Emco 10 weighs 440lbs. The little Emco 5 weighs less than the tailstock on my Hardinge.

You do not mill on a precision lathe  :hellno: No professional would consider milling on their lathe they would use a separate Milling machine.


I think you are just looking for a basic lathe, not a precision lathe. If you want to abuse it and mill on it you need to find a manufacturer that does a vertical slide for their lathes.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:14:47 PM by Jo »
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Online Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2021, 07:18:41 PM »
Jo he wants the lathe for the turned components and has enquired elsewhere about mills for milling.

There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines

However like any machine bought second hand it will depend on what condition it is in as to whether it can still produce as accurate part as when it left the factory.

OP is in UAE

« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:26:23 PM by Jasonb »

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2021, 07:26:01 PM »
Jo he wants the lathe for the turned components and has enquired elsewhere about mills for milling.

He is claiming to be a she on her profile  :headscratch:

I've seen some amazing turning done on an Adept lathe as well and those model engine won at international competition. One off engines are easy to do. Commercial repeatability is another matter.

Jo
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Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2021, 07:41:30 PM »
Back to xzsawq21....

Would you like to make an introduction post about yourself, providing us with some details about your interest in making model engines. This will enable the members to help you more.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:45:30 PM by Jo »
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2021, 08:28:08 PM »
I think you are just looking for a basic lathe, not a precision lathe.

Jo
I want to buy a Wabeco F1210 to have a CNC milling machine and I want to buy a precision lathe to make small size precision round things.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 08:33:59 PM by xzsawq21 »

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2021, 08:38:38 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:

As a retired qualified professional machinist I took mild exception to this comment: see my Stirling and my Brit and other bits...

You do not mill on a precision lathe  :hellno: No professional would consider milling on their lathe they would use a separate Milling machine.

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2021, 09:38:45 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 09:42:29 PM by Jo »
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Online Vixen

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2021, 10:37:11 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo

Is that because Hardinges and Schaublins were better suited to the precision required to build jet fighters and space craft and rather wasted machining model steam engine parts.


It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2021, 11:26:40 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo

Is that because Hardinges and Schaublins were better suited to the precision required to build jet fighters and space craft and rather wasted machining model steam engine parts.

Love it!
Those of us who have actually managed machine shops and toolrooms really do know the difference between machine capabilities!
Horses for courses...
John

Offline PJPickard

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2021, 12:07:51 PM »
To the OP: are you doing this for paying work? I would not consider any lather other than the mentioned Hardinge HLVH for this kind of work if so. I do this as my day job, I work in a physics instrument shop at a university. We have two HLVH's at work and they will provide you with the quality you need. At my home shop I have a Harrison AA and a Myford Super 7, both nice lathes but they aren't a Hardinge. The Monarch EE would be another excellent choice...but you won't get that in a basement!

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2021, 05:15:33 PM »
Have you considered a Sherline?

Jo
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Offline john mills

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2021, 08:50:09 PM »
as a machinist having used CNC lathes and mills i have also used lathes and ones with live tooling so would do the milling in the lathe while
the work is set in the lathe and with more modern machines milling in the lathe should be more common with interactive programming
finished parts of the lathe .i don't think the more precision tools are wasted its often more cost and whats available to run in home work shop
with a domestic power supply  I would always mill in the lathe if the machine is available but mostly can not be cause i no longer have access to the machines for industry or  manufacturing these types of machines should be considered .some jobs are better suited to a separate milling machine but for turning and milling lots can be done on the lathe with live tooling.
John

Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2021, 09:04:36 PM »
Have you considered a Sherline?

Jo
I think Sherline is suitable for woodworking! its motor is only 60W and the lathe is light weight.
I checked Hardinge HLVH, it's really rigid but shipping cost for 500Kg or 1000Kg is too high. I'm thinking about WABECO D4000 or Proxxon PD 400. several researchers have used WABECO D4000 in their high pressure lab:
http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/spip.php?article101&lang=fr

Quote
Precision Lathe, Wabeco D-4000
In 2016, ee purchase a WABECO precision Lathe D4000 with prismatic cast iron bed, 1.4 kW and a center distance 350 mm. It permit precision machining of iron or cupper jackettes, metals capsules, small tools, machinale ceramics, and HT furnace making.