Author Topic: Precision Lathe  (Read 3384 times)

Offline xzsawq21

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Precision Lathe
« on: November 17, 2021, 09:52:28 AM »
Hello
I want to make small precision things within 0.001" accuracy, the diameter of the TEFLON rod is only 3/8". I have been looking for a precision lathe for three months! I don't know which lathe I should buy, WABECO D2000, Schaublin 102, EMCO compact 5,.... could you please help me to find a suitable lathe? I'm really frustrated after three months!
(I have found several Schaublin 102 but all of them are plain lathe, I mean without any leadscrew.) I have checked most of YouTube videos and other forums but I need to finalize my decision.

This is an instrument which I should make, as you see there are two 1.5mm grooves within 0.025mm accuracy around the rod.


Thanks
« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 10:03:34 AM by xzsawq21 »

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2021, 01:03:00 PM »
I am not sure what lathes are available in the States: One that can easily do what you are asking is a Hardinge but the three lathes you have quoted are bench top lathes. Which makes me ask: Do you want a bench top lathe? Or do or have space for a floor standing one?

"Small precision" to me implies watchmaking lathes but to a marine engineer they would have a different concept of small. Threads under about 4mm tend not to be cut by the lathe but using dies. I have known engineers thread cut threads on bar stock below 0.5mm diameter :paranoia: just to prove it could be done then another made a matching nut by thread cutting inside the nut... prove his skills were better  :ShakeHead:. Which reminds me I need to cut a 22mm diameter thread for my Schaublin 70  :thinking:

If you are looking for repeatability  you will require some sort of accurate measurement readout on the lathe and if you are looking for 0.025mm repeated accuracy you may also have to consider a level of temperature/humidity stability (model engineers tend to have their lathes in cold damp sheds then put a heater on while working and wonder why things change their sizes  ::) )

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2021, 01:05:21 PM »
In the right hands they will all be capable of working to that accuracy as will many others, I can even do it on my Chinese one.

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2021, 02:09:24 PM »
Yes any old lathe can be made to work accurately in the right hands.

If you want to do the same turning time and time again have you considered a form tool?

Jo
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Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2021, 03:31:11 PM »
It might be helpful to know where in the world you are located. Most folks add their location in the Personal Text box of their Forum Profile.

I agree with Jo small precision lathe to me means a watchmaker's lathe. The names I would consider in this class would be Levin or Derbyshire in the US or Pultra in the UK. This type of lathe is usually a split bed type of lathe and is rarely equipped with a leadscrew that is geared to the spindle. These lathes are usually 50mm lathes so if you want to make things larger than that diameter you need to look elsewhere.

Plastic cuts with a continuous chip that makes a rat nest that will flip around and causes trouble. I took my Sherline outside in the wind to fix this on one job. The long chip just sailed away in the wind.

What other type of work do you plan? You mentioned a lead screw do you want this for power feed or thread cutting or both.

Cheers Dan

ShaylocoDan

Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2021, 07:10:32 PM »
What do you think about WABECO D2000 or OptiTurn TU2004V?
I usually work with Aluminum/Brass/Teflon rods. In my general work the dimension is 1"x8" and accuracy is within 0.1mm but in my precision work the dimension is 3/8"x1/2" and accuracy is within 0.01mm to 0.05mm. Actually I want to make the things for the instrument industry.












« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 07:14:34 PM by xzsawq21 »

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2021, 07:24:11 PM »
I think SCO has/had a Wabeco. Last I saw he now has a Pultra  :thinking:

What ever you choose make sure go and try the lathe before you buy. Some people find no problem with that built down to a price feel, others wouldn't give one workshop space. 

Jo
« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 07:56:05 PM by Jo »
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Online steamer

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2021, 01:42:09 AM »
I would buy the largest lathe you can afford, and make sure it is well tooled

4 jaw chuck
3 jaw chuck
faceplate
centers
drill chuck
tool post
fixed steady
traveling steady

You can spend as much on tooling for a lathe as you do on the lathe itself, so shop around and buy it right.

You don't need a Schaublin to turn to .001.....maybe .0001

Dave
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2021, 06:55:51 AM »
Looking at those photos there is very little turning there so you may well be better off with a milling machine.

Will these be one off components for your own use or are you thinking of making batches for commercial gain as I think you are, if the later then a CNC mill would be the only way to compete price wise as doing them manually would have very high labour costs. This applies to both a lathe and mill whichever you end up with.

Online sco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2021, 08:34:26 AM »
I think SCO has/had a Wabeco. Last I saw he now has a Pultra  :thinking:

What ever you choose make sure go and try the lathe before you buy. Some people find no problem with that built down to a price feel, others wouldn't give one workshop space. 

Jo

I did indeed have a D2000 (now a Boley and a 102).  Did a lot of good work with the D2000 - basic mechanical precision is good right out of the box and needs no careful setup.  Electrics a little bit flaky - needed a couple of speed control boards supplied under warranty.  You need to make sure that the carriage locked to the leadscrew is the right solution for you - takes a lot of twirling to go from one end of the bed to the other!

Simon.
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Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2021, 08:55:00 AM »
I did indeed have a D2000 (now a Boley and a 102). 

:facepalm:

A Boley not a Pultra  :slap: sorry SCO. Did you see I have a new old 70 just joined our workshop collection  :naughty:


Finding a good second hand lathe takes a while, finding any second hand Swiss machine tools, at an affordable price, even longer.

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2021, 01:39:04 PM »
I have found several Emco Compact 5 lathes, what do you think about the lathe? Or Proxxon PD400 or WABECO d4000 is better? Thanks

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2021, 04:59:47 PM »
Do they still make the Compact 5?  :noidea: Those three lathes are rather different in their sizes/capability/price. Is there anywhere locally you can go and try out these machines to find out which you prefer?

I get the idea that you were talking about using this for manufacturing purposes: If it is for industrial use have you considered an industrial machine rather than a DIY one?

I would not look to buy a machine via the internet/post without trying one first. There are a few exceptions from companies with impeccable reputations whose customer service is to the same high standard. e.g. I seem to remember one of my friends ordered a Schaublin 70 new from Schaublin and when they asked what he would like with it said: "Oh, everything". When they said do you know what that will cost, his reply was "that is not relevant I if I need it it should be there". Even he had tried using one first   ::)

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2021, 06:14:39 PM »
Is there anywhere locally you can go and try out these machines to find out which you prefer?

I get the idea that you were talking about using this for manufacturing purposes.
No, in our country especially in our state, there is no precision lathe.
Here, our mechanics only have big lathes and their workshops are very dirty. I have checked most of the forums but the information is very limited. My focus is on a milling machine (WABECO F1210 HS ISO30), for turning and boring process, sometimes I need a precision lathe. I want to produce small and precision parts for local companies.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 06:22:47 PM by xzsawq21 »

Offline Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2021, 06:19:40 PM »
Where are you, one of the members may be able to point you at some where with machines you can look at.

Jo
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