Author Topic: Precision Lathe  (Read 3322 times)

Offline xzsawq21

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Precision Lathe
« on: November 17, 2021, 09:52:28 AM »
Hello
I want to make small precision things within 0.001" accuracy, the diameter of the TEFLON rod is only 3/8". I have been looking for a precision lathe for three months! I don't know which lathe I should buy, WABECO D2000, Schaublin 102, EMCO compact 5,.... could you please help me to find a suitable lathe? I'm really frustrated after three months!
(I have found several Schaublin 102 but all of them are plain lathe, I mean without any leadscrew.) I have checked most of YouTube videos and other forums but I need to finalize my decision.

This is an instrument which I should make, as you see there are two 1.5mm grooves within 0.025mm accuracy around the rod.


Thanks
« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 10:03:34 AM by xzsawq21 »

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2021, 01:03:00 PM »
I am not sure what lathes are available in the States: One that can easily do what you are asking is a Hardinge but the three lathes you have quoted are bench top lathes. Which makes me ask: Do you want a bench top lathe? Or do or have space for a floor standing one?

"Small precision" to me implies watchmaking lathes but to a marine engineer they would have a different concept of small. Threads under about 4mm tend not to be cut by the lathe but using dies. I have known engineers thread cut threads on bar stock below 0.5mm diameter :paranoia: just to prove it could be done then another made a matching nut by thread cutting inside the nut... prove his skills were better  :ShakeHead:. Which reminds me I need to cut a 22mm diameter thread for my Schaublin 70  :thinking:

If you are looking for repeatability  you will require some sort of accurate measurement readout on the lathe and if you are looking for 0.025mm repeated accuracy you may also have to consider a level of temperature/humidity stability (model engineers tend to have their lathes in cold damp sheds then put a heater on while working and wonder why things change their sizes  ::) )

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2021, 01:05:21 PM »
In the right hands they will all be capable of working to that accuracy as will many others, I can even do it on my Chinese one.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2021, 02:09:24 PM »
Yes any old lathe can be made to work accurately in the right hands.

If you want to do the same turning time and time again have you considered a form tool?

Jo
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Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2021, 03:31:11 PM »
It might be helpful to know where in the world you are located. Most folks add their location in the Personal Text box of their Forum Profile.

I agree with Jo small precision lathe to me means a watchmaker's lathe. The names I would consider in this class would be Levin or Derbyshire in the US or Pultra in the UK. This type of lathe is usually a split bed type of lathe and is rarely equipped with a leadscrew that is geared to the spindle. These lathes are usually 50mm lathes so if you want to make things larger than that diameter you need to look elsewhere.

Plastic cuts with a continuous chip that makes a rat nest that will flip around and causes trouble. I took my Sherline outside in the wind to fix this on one job. The long chip just sailed away in the wind.

What other type of work do you plan? You mentioned a lead screw do you want this for power feed or thread cutting or both.

Cheers Dan

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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2021, 07:10:32 PM »
What do you think about WABECO D2000 or OptiTurn TU2004V?
I usually work with Aluminum/Brass/Teflon rods. In my general work the dimension is 1"x8" and accuracy is within 0.1mm but in my precision work the dimension is 3/8"x1/2" and accuracy is within 0.01mm to 0.05mm. Actually I want to make the things for the instrument industry.












« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 07:14:34 PM by xzsawq21 »

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2021, 07:24:11 PM »
I think SCO has/had a Wabeco. Last I saw he now has a Pultra  :thinking:

What ever you choose make sure go and try the lathe before you buy. Some people find no problem with that built down to a price feel, others wouldn't give one workshop space. 

Jo
« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 07:56:05 PM by Jo »
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Offline steamer

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2021, 01:42:09 AM »
I would buy the largest lathe you can afford, and make sure it is well tooled

4 jaw chuck
3 jaw chuck
faceplate
centers
drill chuck
tool post
fixed steady
traveling steady

You can spend as much on tooling for a lathe as you do on the lathe itself, so shop around and buy it right.

You don't need a Schaublin to turn to .001.....maybe .0001

Dave
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2021, 06:55:51 AM »
Looking at those photos there is very little turning there so you may well be better off with a milling machine.

Will these be one off components for your own use or are you thinking of making batches for commercial gain as I think you are, if the later then a CNC mill would be the only way to compete price wise as doing them manually would have very high labour costs. This applies to both a lathe and mill whichever you end up with.

Online sco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2021, 08:34:26 AM »
I think SCO has/had a Wabeco. Last I saw he now has a Pultra  :thinking:

What ever you choose make sure go and try the lathe before you buy. Some people find no problem with that built down to a price feel, others wouldn't give one workshop space. 

Jo

I did indeed have a D2000 (now a Boley and a 102).  Did a lot of good work with the D2000 - basic mechanical precision is good right out of the box and needs no careful setup.  Electrics a little bit flaky - needed a couple of speed control boards supplied under warranty.  You need to make sure that the carriage locked to the leadscrew is the right solution for you - takes a lot of twirling to go from one end of the bed to the other!

Simon.
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Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2021, 08:55:00 AM »
I did indeed have a D2000 (now a Boley and a 102). 

:facepalm:

A Boley not a Pultra  :slap: sorry SCO. Did you see I have a new old 70 just joined our workshop collection  :naughty:


Finding a good second hand lathe takes a while, finding any second hand Swiss machine tools, at an affordable price, even longer.

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2021, 01:39:04 PM »
I have found several Emco Compact 5 lathes, what do you think about the lathe? Or Proxxon PD400 or WABECO d4000 is better? Thanks

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2021, 04:59:47 PM »
Do they still make the Compact 5?  :noidea: Those three lathes are rather different in their sizes/capability/price. Is there anywhere locally you can go and try out these machines to find out which you prefer?

I get the idea that you were talking about using this for manufacturing purposes: If it is for industrial use have you considered an industrial machine rather than a DIY one?

I would not look to buy a machine via the internet/post without trying one first. There are a few exceptions from companies with impeccable reputations whose customer service is to the same high standard. e.g. I seem to remember one of my friends ordered a Schaublin 70 new from Schaublin and when they asked what he would like with it said: "Oh, everything". When they said do you know what that will cost, his reply was "that is not relevant I if I need it it should be there". Even he had tried using one first   ::)

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2021, 06:14:39 PM »
Is there anywhere locally you can go and try out these machines to find out which you prefer?

I get the idea that you were talking about using this for manufacturing purposes.
No, in our country especially in our state, there is no precision lathe.
Here, our mechanics only have big lathes and their workshops are very dirty. I have checked most of the forums but the information is very limited. My focus is on a milling machine (WABECO F1210 HS ISO30), for turning and boring process, sometimes I need a precision lathe. I want to produce small and precision parts for local companies.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 06:22:47 PM by xzsawq21 »

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2021, 06:19:40 PM »
Where are you, one of the members may be able to point you at some where with machines you can look at.

Jo
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Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2021, 06:27:12 PM »
 :headscratch:
My focus is on a milling machine (WABECO F1210 HS ISO30), for turning and boring process, sometimes I need a precision lathe. I want to produce small and precision parts for local companies.

It strikes me that you are struggling to articulate your need for a lathe, which is why the other forums couldn't help you. Silly question: what experience do you have using a lathe?

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2021, 06:45:12 PM »
I mean in my work sometimes I need a precision lathe (70% milling and 30% turning) but I don't know how much the mentioned lathes are rigid.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 06:49:53 PM by xzsawq21 »

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2021, 07:07:13 PM »
My Hardinge HLV-H precision lathe has the same turning space as an Emco 10.  I consider the Hardinge to be acceptably rigid for precision work: it weighs 1800 lbs, the Emco 10 weighs 440lbs. The little Emco 5 weighs less than the tailstock on my Hardinge.

You do not mill on a precision lathe  :hellno: No professional would consider milling on their lathe they would use a separate Milling machine.


I think you are just looking for a basic lathe, not a precision lathe. If you want to abuse it and mill on it you need to find a manufacturer that does a vertical slide for their lathes.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:14:47 PM by Jo »
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2021, 07:18:41 PM »
Jo he wants the lathe for the turned components and has enquired elsewhere about mills for milling.

There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines

However like any machine bought second hand it will depend on what condition it is in as to whether it can still produce as accurate part as when it left the factory.

OP is in UAE

« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:26:23 PM by Jasonb »

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2021, 07:26:01 PM »
Jo he wants the lathe for the turned components and has enquired elsewhere about mills for milling.

He is claiming to be a she on her profile  :headscratch:

I've seen some amazing turning done on an Adept lathe as well and those model engine won at international competition. One off engines are easy to do. Commercial repeatability is another matter.

Jo
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Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2021, 07:41:30 PM »
Back to xzsawq21....

Would you like to make an introduction post about yourself, providing us with some details about your interest in making model engines. This will enable the members to help you more.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 07:45:30 PM by Jo »
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2021, 08:28:08 PM »
I think you are just looking for a basic lathe, not a precision lathe.

Jo
I want to buy a Wabeco F1210 to have a CNC milling machine and I want to buy a precision lathe to make small size precision round things.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 08:33:59 PM by xzsawq21 »

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2021, 08:38:38 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:

As a retired qualified professional machinist I took mild exception to this comment: see my Stirling and my Brit and other bits...

You do not mill on a precision lathe  :hellno: No professional would consider milling on their lathe they would use a separate Milling machine.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2021, 09:38:45 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo
« Last Edit: November 19, 2021, 09:42:29 PM by Jo »
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Online Vixen

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2021, 10:37:11 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo

Is that because Hardinges and Schaublins were better suited to the precision required to build jet fighters and space craft and rather wasted machining model steam engine parts.


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Offline simplyloco

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2021, 11:26:40 PM »
There is some very precise work done on the Compact 5 machines, such as high performance model aircraft engines used in international competition, these guys don't lap their pistons they turn the high silicon content alloys with CBN inserts and work to microns. Even back in the day when the Compact 5 was sold Emco made a big point that it was used by Hanno Prettner to work on his engines


Agreed. My Austrian made EMCO V10P with FB2 is a match for any jumped up blue painted Swiss gadget... :Jester:


I never saw any Emco's on the Typhoon Aircraft or any other defence/Satellite production lines or in their associated toolrooms ::) I did see plenty of Hardinges and Schaublins.

Jo

Is that because Hardinges and Schaublins were better suited to the precision required to build jet fighters and space craft and rather wasted machining model steam engine parts.

Love it!
Those of us who have actually managed machine shops and toolrooms really do know the difference between machine capabilities!
Horses for courses...
John

Offline PJPickard

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2021, 12:07:51 PM »
To the OP: are you doing this for paying work? I would not consider any lather other than the mentioned Hardinge HLVH for this kind of work if so. I do this as my day job, I work in a physics instrument shop at a university. We have two HLVH's at work and they will provide you with the quality you need. At my home shop I have a Harrison AA and a Myford Super 7, both nice lathes but they aren't a Hardinge. The Monarch EE would be another excellent choice...but you won't get that in a basement!

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2021, 05:15:33 PM »
Have you considered a Sherline?

Jo
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Offline john mills

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2021, 08:50:09 PM »
as a machinist having used CNC lathes and mills i have also used lathes and ones with live tooling so would do the milling in the lathe while
the work is set in the lathe and with more modern machines milling in the lathe should be more common with interactive programming
finished parts of the lathe .i don't think the more precision tools are wasted its often more cost and whats available to run in home work shop
with a domestic power supply  I would always mill in the lathe if the machine is available but mostly can not be cause i no longer have access to the machines for industry or  manufacturing these types of machines should be considered .some jobs are better suited to a separate milling machine but for turning and milling lots can be done on the lathe with live tooling.
John

Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2021, 09:04:36 PM »
Have you considered a Sherline?

Jo
I think Sherline is suitable for woodworking! its motor is only 60W and the lathe is light weight.
I checked Hardinge HLVH, it's really rigid but shipping cost for 500Kg or 1000Kg is too high. I'm thinking about WABECO D4000 or Proxxon PD 400. several researchers have used WABECO D4000 in their high pressure lab:
http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/spip.php?article101&lang=fr

Quote
Precision Lathe, Wabeco D-4000
In 2016, ee purchase a WABECO precision Lathe D4000 with prismatic cast iron bed, 1.4 kW and a center distance 350 mm. It permit precision machining of iron or cupper jackettes, metals capsules, small tools, machinale ceramics, and HT furnace making.


Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2021, 09:12:42 PM »
You still have not introduced yourself to the members   :disappointed:.


Have you considered a Sherline?


I think Sherline is suitable for woodworking!

Have you seen what Chris is making on his Sherline? : https://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,10250.msg233287.html#msg233287 Its a bit more than woodwork  ::)

Jo
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Offline crueby

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #31 on: November 20, 2021, 09:53:29 PM »
Yes, a Sherline is capable of a heck of a lot more than woodworking - I've made quite a few very large steam engines with it, flywheels up to 8" diameter, parts down very small.
Is it as rigid as a lathe weighing hundreds of pounds? Of course not. Is it capable of turning small parts like the original post asked about? Of course it is. With proper skill, a spring-pole lathe can do wondrous things too, all depends on the user. I would not pick one for mass producing aircraft turbines or full size automotive engines - scale of tool to part is everything.

It can do this though - 100+ pounds, 4 two-cylinder steam engines, boiler, tracks, frame, 4-1/2 feet long:

Woodworking only, my ass!  I'd take one over a Proxxon any day.

Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #32 on: November 20, 2021, 10:54:42 PM »
If a Sherline is big enough but lacks power and rigid mass then look here:

https://levinlathe.com/menu.htm

I have a Levin with a 3C headstock so it can pass 1/2" round stock. I actually have it powered with a Sherline motor and consider it all the power I need.

Check here to see my house shop with a Levin lathe and a Derbyshire Micromill, both machines designed small production work.
https://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,9872.msg224736.html#msg224736

Dan
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Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2021, 10:00:32 AM »
I like that little Levin 8)

Not cheap but it is an instrument maker's lathe and as I have said before: you get what you pay for  ;)

Jo
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Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #34 on: November 21, 2021, 04:03:39 PM »
It's always interesting to me how the people that write off Sherline machines as being inadequate are always people that have never used one or have never even really looked around to see what folks like Chris have done with theirs.

To the OP: You seem pretty well set on the Wabeco D-4000, so it might be best to move beyond the "analysis paralysis" and get one and get to work on your project.  I'm sure it's a fine machine.

Jim

PS: I haven't seen any mention of Cowells lathes in this conversation. Other than what Jo and Bill Lindsey have talked theirs, I know nothing about them.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2021, 04:07:01 PM by Flyboy Jim »
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
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Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #35 on: November 21, 2021, 04:48:01 PM »
PS: I haven't seen any mention of Cowells lathes in this conversation. Other than what Jo and Bill Lindsey have talked theirs, I know nothing about them.

There used to be a rather long waiting list for a new Cowells lathe, I think Bill mentioned he managed to get his within 6 months of the original order :thinking: They are a very, very nice little lathe  :Love: Little C gets regularly used. Its another of those lathes where the saddle is "fixed" on the lead screw so there can be a lot of winding to move the carriage anywhere.

Jo
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Offline xzsawq21

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #36 on: November 21, 2021, 08:14:40 PM »
Why have many people reported defects in the WABECO D4000?

https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=115245

Quote
Hello, I've bought famous German Wabeco D4000 Lathe custom made had to wait 3months, but the quality is very bad. Look at defective hand wheels from china

Look same handwheels in china http://archive.is/HL7H3

I'm fed up with their support that answes once a week!

After this reply I'm stumped

"I contact our technician again.
Kindly send us pictures of the spare parts and describe what is wrong.
For example you claim that part 24 16073430003014 is not correct.
This is a DIN part and canīt be wrong."

I emailed requested replace parts:

- TRAVERSE SKID manual page 18.8

- PART 16 10400454
- PART 17 10400433
- PART 20 51004035-0010
- PART 23 51507023-0001
- PART 24 16073430003014
- PART 33 10400406

- LONGITUDINAL SKID manual page 18.10

- PART 5  10400501
- PART 20 51004035-0010
- PART 45 10400519
- PART 46 10400528
- PART 52 51507023-0001
- PART 53 16073430003014
- PART 57 10400508

- TAILSTOCK manual page 18.11

- PART 6 (51006550-0003) and 20 (51502517) Together PART 8 (10400624)
- PART 11 (51004035-0012) PART 21 (51507023-0001) PART 22
- 16073430003014

- TOOL SKID LOCK PLATE manual page 18.9

- PART 22 (51006555-0021)
- PART 33 (10400433)
- PART 27 (51004035-0011)
- PART 31 (16073430003024)

Afterwads 22 days of silence from Wabeco. It has been 5 years since no parts arrived no communication with the reputable german seller. Lathe is not used.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #37 on: November 21, 2021, 08:41:31 PM »
It is good manners to introduce yourself and tell us about your interest in making model engines before you start trying to gain from the members experience and knowledge.

Jo

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Offline Laurentic

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #38 on: November 21, 2021, 11:11:37 PM »
Don't think xzsawq21 is listening Jo, or understanding what you are writing - so far it seems none of your questions have been answered.

Not impressed. Not a courteous mode of conduct on what is a very friendly and helpful forum. 

Doesn't exactly encourage anyone to comment or make suggestions to help further - very bad form indeed. 

Chris

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #39 on: November 22, 2021, 07:58:56 AM »
Don't think xzsawq21 is listening Jo, or understanding what you are writing - so far it seems none of your questions have been answered.


I would think English is not the OP's first language so quite possibly not understanding. It's also quite clear they have no interest in making engines so can't post about that but have probably come here in the hope that our members are the type who use the Wabeco machines.

This is also the only forum where I find such forcible requests for an intro. 99% of first posts I approve are not intro ones and at least 75% of those new members probably don't subsequently post any form of intro

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #40 on: November 22, 2021, 08:54:39 AM »
This is also the only forum where I find such forcible requests for an intro. 99% of first posts I approve are not intro ones and at least 75% of those new members probably don't subsequently post any form of intro

I don't think that asking is forcible: there was no threat attached to either request. We do not approve people's first posts we do monitor what is going on to make sure none of the members are being antagonistic or trying to wind up other members. The advantage of having members introduce themselves is that other members understand their background and capabilities. This means they will answer the new member taking this into account and over time through watching them make things get to know their true capabilities, enabling them to respond accordingly.

Take the OP - I suspect they have no experience or interest in making model engines and that they are looking to set up a small commercial jobbing shop. I also suspect that they have limited machining experience and this is why they are unable to join in with the conversation about the lathe requirements. They were asked where they came from and did not respond, this means we cannot suggest what lathes are actually available in their country. If we knew they were trying to converse in a different language that their mother language that would also account for their abrupt responses, which may otherwise cause offence.

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #41 on: November 22, 2021, 10:16:08 AM »
I did post where they are based (#18) and that is why I said English is unlikely to be their native one.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #42 on: November 22, 2021, 12:25:00 PM »
Its for new members to provide their own introduction and any details they think might be relevant  ::) .

Jo
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Online Kim

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #43 on: November 22, 2021, 06:34:02 PM »
I would think English is not the OP's first language so quite possibly not understanding. It's also quite clear they have no interest in making engines so can't post about that but have probably come here in the hope that our members are the type who use the Wabeco machines.

This is also the only forum where I find such forcible requests for an intro. 99% of first posts I approve are not intro ones and at least 75% of those new members probably don't subsequently post any form of intro

True, most other forums don't request members to post intros.  But that IS part of our culture on MEM.  It's something that's been a part of the forum since it was started, and I think it's a nice thing.  I LIKE that this forum isn't like most other forums :)

Do you really think asking someone to introduce themselves is too much, Jason?  It doesn't take that much effort and it lets people know a little about you.  You don't have to share info you don't want to, and you don't have to write anything lengthy.  But it's just one of our traditions on MEM.  If you think it is overburdensome, maybe we should have that discussion.  But I've never heard the issue brought up before in the last 9-10 years this site has been around.  And it seems like a fairly reasonable and distinctive feature of our forum.  I think it's one of the things that helps keep us civil, allowing us to get to know each other a bit and all.

Kim

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #44 on: November 22, 2021, 07:04:53 PM »
Hard for new members to know what the forum culture is unless they have been lurking for a long time.

It is not so much the asking but the way that I quiet often see it being asked. Take post #28 for example effectively saying the person is bad mannered when they simply may not have been able to understand what was being asked is hardly welcoming.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #45 on: November 22, 2021, 07:28:55 PM »
It is not so much the asking but the way that I quiet often see it being asked. Take post #28 for example effectively saying the person is bad mannered when they simply may not have been able to understand what was being asked is hardly welcoming.

Post #28 from John:

as a machinist having used CNC lathes and mills i have also used lathes and ones with live tooling so would do the milling in the lathe while
the work is set in the lathe and with more modern machines milling in the lathe should be more common with interactive programming
finished parts of the lathe .i don't think the more precision tools are wasted its often more cost and whats available to run in home work shop
with a domestic power supply  I would always mill in the lathe if the machine is available but mostly can not be cause i no longer have access to the machines for industry or  manufacturing these types of machines should be considered .some jobs are better suited to a separate milling machine but for turning and milling lots can be done on the lathe with live tooling.
John

I am at a loss about why you consider John has been bad mannered or is implying the OP might be. John has brought out an interesting point that those of us who do not use CNC would consider to be old fashioned - milling in the lathe.

However this post by the OP:

Why have many people reported defects in the WABECO D4000?

https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=115245

etc. etc.


Does seem to be very direct in their response, which maybe why no one wanted to respond  :shrug: There is a saying: manners maketh a man  ;)

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #46 on: November 22, 2021, 07:41:15 PM »
Sorry meant post #37

Oh and I do still sometimes mill on my lathe even though I have CNC, just use whatever suits the job in hand best. Also regularly use it as a horizontal boring machine. Luckily most of the far eastern machines have a milling friendly cross slide with tee slots.

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #47 on: November 22, 2021, 08:26:56 PM »
Sorry meant post #37

Post #37:

It is good manners to introduce yourself and tell us about your interest in making model engines before you start trying to gain from the members experience and knowledge.

Jo

I apologise to any members who took offense by this post as Jason has done, it was not my intention to offend anyone  :-[

Jo
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Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #48 on: November 22, 2021, 08:32:51 PM »
It might be helpful to know where in the world you are located. Most folks add their location in the Personal Text box of their Forum Profile.

What other type of work do you plan? You mentioned a lead screw do you want this for power feed or thread cutting or both.

I was the first member to ask about the OP's location and I gave a reason for the question I also asked why a lead screw was important. Nether concern was addressed by the OP.

This makes it hard to answer any questions about a lathe selection, of course, I like talking about lathes so I made another attempt which also was given no response by the OP.

I do not care about being rude for the most part I am an engineer and we are usually not known for polite conversation, but it is not possible to help someone that can or will not answer simple questions.

Oh yeah I have used my milling machine as a lathe and a lathe as a shaper and a mill. Why do they make vertical slides for lathes?

Cheers Dan

ShaylocoDan

Online Jo

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #49 on: November 22, 2021, 08:36:54 PM »
Why do they make vertical slides for lathes?

Cheers Dan

To enable us to do between centres boring  ;D

Jo
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Offline GWRdriver

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Re: Precision Lathe
« Reply #50 on: November 23, 2021, 03:16:10 AM »
I had the same thought, about the lack of mentions of Cowells machines.   I have owned two Cowells of 1980s vintage, the ME90 90mm standard lathe, and the CW90 which is their clock/watchmakers version.  White both these lathes are robust, superbly made, and superbly finished, due to being accustomed to larger conventional lathes I found the ME90 to be difficult to use, in part as Jo mentions, because there's a lot of winding.  I also found the ME90 to be under-powered, or at least unable to transmit the full power of its motor through plastic change-belts.  Replacing belts did little to improve the situation and I no longer own that machine.

The CW90 with Thyristor (variable) drive was (is) equally well made, and IMHO is a considerable improvement over the typical WW-style jeweler's/watchmaker's lathe (such as a Boley.).  A WW-style lathe isn't for everyone of course, but I find them useful for detail parts.  The CW90 accepts WW-style tooling but is substantial enough to support conventional lathe tooling, a 3-jaw chuck for instance, providing it's proportionately small.  They are designed for high speeds so spindle-mounted mass must be kept small.
       

PS: I haven't seen any mention of Cowells lathes in this conversation. Other than what Jo and Bill Lindsey have talked theirs, I know nothing about them.
There used to be a rather long waiting list for a new Cowells lathe, I think Bill mentioned he managed to get his within 6 months of the original order :thinking: They are a very, very nice little lathe  :Love: Little C gets regularly used. Its another of those lathes where the saddle is "fixed" on the lead screw so there can be a lot of winding to move the carriage anywhere.
Jo