Author Topic: An Upshur Farm Engine  (Read 3498 times)

Offline RReid

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Re: An Upshur Farm Engine
« Reply #75 on: November 24, 2021, 03:09:50 PM »
Thank you, Per!
Quote
Are you going to try and match a similar paint job on the rest ?
I might do that, just on the outside surfaces of the frames. Unless I get lazy and don't. I often have ideas about painting the engines that I don't carry out because I don't like painting much!

Some years ago I used what was called "Hammertone" spray paint on the suspension parts I fabricated for a Lotus 7 replica I was building. The color would match that blue pretty well. The "hammered" texture was fairly subtle and looked rather nice, but while I can still find that paint, I've never been able to find that color again. Maybe I'll look once more.
Regards,
Ron

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: An Upshur Farm Engine
« Reply #76 on: November 24, 2021, 09:44:06 PM »
I know the feeling about painting ....

Hamertone has been banned by the EU decades ago (nasty solvents / chemicals), so I haven't seen the 'Real Stuff' since my youth ....
« Last Edit: November 28, 2021, 01:16:31 AM by Admiral_dk »

Offline RReid

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Re: An Upshur Farm Engine
« Reply #77 on: November 27, 2021, 11:56:31 PM »
One thing I enjoy at least as much as making parts from raw bar stock is re-purposing discarded “junk” into useful parts. Flywheels made from old cart/dolly/caster wheels are one example. A fuel tank made from an empty CO2 cartridge is another.

The cartridge was originally in a self-inflating PFD, or life vest. The rip cord wasn't pulled because I fell in, but only because I wanted to test the thing (honest!). That was 5 or six years ago, and the empty cartridge has been knocking around looking for work ever since.

I started by cutting off the end with the threaded nipple. A scrap bit of 12L14 was turned with a short step to fit into the now open bore, and drilled at the lower end for fuel delivery tube (a piece of 5/32 brass tubing). The top of the cartridge was drilled 3/8” near the opposite end to accept a filler neck. This is just a hardware store flanged bushing, also from the “left overs” drawer. Another bit of steel was turned to make a vented cap. This was heated to red and dunked in veggie oil for a "blacksmith's finish".

These various pieces were finally all soldered into place (except the cap), and a coat of grey primer/topcoat was applied.
An easy-peasy job to fill some time while I wait for the ignition coil I ordered to arrive.





Regards,
Ron