Author Topic: Bailey's 1881 Bee  (Read 7873 times)

Online Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #105 on: November 03, 2021, 04:23:58 PM »
In the meantime  ::) I have been trying to get this engine running:

She is thinking about it.. I suspect there is a bit of a leak between the two cylinders so tomorrow I will put some gasket sealant in there. You can hear the pressure building up and can see the bubbles around the power piston rod.

I noticed that another of these engines had added a grub screw on the cast bracket. It is probably there to prevent what happened to mine (see photo). This is caused by a fractional misalignment of the holes somewhere... I think I will also add a grub screw ;)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Online Alyn Foundry

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #106 on: November 04, 2021, 12:06:41 PM »
Hi Jo.

The running, or trying to get running has always been my favourite part of any build. Looking forward to seeing the video.

Having spent many years in the company of vintage machines it makes me wonder if those fixed Brass bushes in the support arms were there originally? The “ bell crank “ seems to have sufficient bearing area and if the horizontal pivot were fixed solidly it wouldn’t ride out. An internet search didn’t find any period photos of this particular Bailey model so I guess we’ll never know unless the model was made from works drawings?

My search did highlight a Robinson patent however, a vertical design that I wasn’t aware of previously. Built by Frank Pearn of Manchester. A name familiar with pumps and steam engines.

Cheers Graham.

Online Jasonb

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #107 on: November 04, 2021, 01:04:49 PM »
I would imagine the originals had the arms done as castings not flat bar and an integral boss at the end. Shaft may well have rotated directly in the iron boss or been pinned and the bell crank rotated on the fixed shaft.

Hope you get it running today Jo or you won't be allowed anything later for "Fondle Thursday"  :(

Online Alyn Foundry

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #108 on: November 04, 2021, 02:38:41 PM »
I would imagine the originals had the arms done as castings not flat bar and an integral boss at the end. Shaft may well have rotated directly in the iron boss or been pinned and the bell crank rotated on the fixed shaft.

I hope this digression isn’t too much but here’s Gardner’s own design. You can clearly see the pivot is secured on either side with the bell crank able to rotate upon the pivot, and yes, the supports were part of the casting. I know they used to minimise the use of what we would term “ exotic “ metals because cast Iron was “ cheap as chips “ back then.

Cheers Graham.

Online Jasonb

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #109 on: November 04, 2021, 04:19:31 PM »
Do you have any more images  or details of that one apart from that one photo of a green one Graham, quite fancy knocking one up.