Author Topic: Bailey's 1881 Bee  (Read 7962 times)

Offline Vixen

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #45 on: September 28, 2021, 03:21:45 PM »
Hello Jo,

Still following along in the background. Almost everything has been in brass/bronze so far. I've never worked those metals very much, so I am watching and learning.
It's interesting to see the different metal colours (after cooking) in the last photo.

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Oh! sod the journey, lets hit the bar and pool instead.

Offline bent

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #46 on: September 28, 2021, 06:45:41 PM »
Love the self-fixturing tabs, Jo!  Gonna steal that idea... :embarassed:

Offline Roger B

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #47 on: September 28, 2021, 08:01:03 PM »
We like pictures  :)  :wine1:  :old:   :headscratch:
Best regards

Roger

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #48 on: September 28, 2021, 11:43:15 PM »
Lots of great progress on the Rocket Bee. :ThumbsUp:

Dave

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #49 on: September 29, 2021, 03:33:22 PM »
 :noidea: Don't know what happened to the pics but I have machined both the displacer cylinder and the hot end. The hot end was silver soldered together and on the end I added a piece of what proved to be hard as  :censored: Stainless. I tried supporting the cylinder with a fixed steady but because the tube section is rather thin it kept moving/crushing the stainless :paranoia: In the end I achieved this:



Yes the top of the hot end cylinder just fits between the back of the chuck and the LO taper  ;D



It was a :censored: to turn, next time I need to make sure the end cap is easy to turn 303  :ThumbsUp: not that hard stuff. Maybe that is why it is still on the shelf  :thinking:

The next trick was to get the hot end to fit into the hole through all the castings. I decided the best way to see if I had cleaned it up enough was to poke it in in reverse:



As you can see the natural curve on the silver solder is preventing the hot cap from sitting tight against the casting. Once that was removed it was then time to slide it all together:



To find   :o:toilet_claw:



There is a gap  . Further investigations on the cross sectional drawing shows a gasket and it should be 1.5mm thick. So I am calling that success  :)


The displacer cylinder is a piece of tube with two end caps made super thin:



These need to be loctited in once the length of the displacer is known from the build. Which leaves that nasty looking displacer rod. If you read the instructions it says the bottom half is mild steel and the top half is brass  :thinking: I am not convinced a 5BA thread in a 4.76mm diameter rod looks particularly strong  :hellno: 

Having checked the piece of brass I intend on using is straight by rolling it on a surface plate:



And added a 5BA thread to a piece of 3.2mm diameter stainless for the bottom half of the rod. I can begin to contemplate if I am happy or not with so little brass left holding things together  :noidea:

Jo


Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #50 on: September 29, 2021, 05:24:02 PM »
Great to see your progress Jo :ThumbsUp:

Any idea why the specifications say that the rod should be made out of two different materials ?

Per

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #51 on: October 01, 2021, 03:30:22 PM »
Thank you Per,

The top half of the rod acts as a bearing material through the middle of the piston so the brass would be a better choice than steel.


Talking of pistons I have turned the one up for this engine and it is a nice tight push fit through the power cylinder. The only tricky bit was threading the inside centre of the piston. I luckily managed to find a die and holder to fit.



The other option would have been to screw cut it (but using the die was easier  ;) )

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Roger B

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #52 on: October 02, 2021, 07:47:59 AM »
That's a neat solution to threading inside the piston  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #53 on: October 03, 2021, 02:20:06 PM »
Thank you Roger,

Drawing error time :o



The piston collar shows M3 thread and the bolts to go into it are shown as 6BA  :slap: The red arrow shows that the hole they go into are blind not a good idea  :ShakeHead: If you do blind holes the tap cannot go full depth and when you try to tighten up the bolts this happens:



Drilled out and tapped through to the centre it all goes together:



After all that excitement I decided to go for something simple, for some reason Anthony had it as the first item he made but I will finally get round to doing the flywheel. The first question is why did it have that spare piece of cast Iron on it  :headscratch:



There is no way you want to try turning a flywheel using a little central stub - it will be ringing before you can say "Jason never makes mistakes"  ::) Best remove it to avoid tempting fate. First turning the outside round to a known size, then cutting it off so it can go in my come-in-handie stores  ;)

Jo

Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #54 on: October 03, 2021, 03:41:30 PM »
The flywheel was held by the inside of the rim, hard against the face of the chuck, in a position that minimised any wobbling about, to have the outside of the rim turned round and to have the centre bored out:

 

The bored was taken out so that a piece of the crankshaft stainless was a tight fit in it:



You may have noticed that the outside of the chuck jaws stuck out beyond the inside of the rim which prevented me from completing the facing operation. Having managed to get most of the way across the face I took the flywheel over and mounted it using outside jaws - which have that little half round cut away right next to the jaw which means that the ridge remaining on the face was not a problem. I could now face the flywheel:



and also do the outside of the boss in the centre before flipping it over and facing the other side. I have left the flywheel over sized both by diameter and by width. I can't see any point in reducing them and the extra weight will help the engine to run.



I had a look in the box of castings to find other than the bronze displacer cylinder liner that I chose  ::) not to use there is only this casting remaining:



Its going to be a tricky little one as the sides are not parallel and there isn't a straight edge anywhere   :thinking: There is not much to go on this engine I might have to start negotiations for the next set of engine castings :)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Bluechip

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #55 on: October 03, 2021, 08:46:46 PM »
Cracking along now, Sarge ....  :ThumbsUp:  :D

How long until it cranks up ??

Dave

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #56 on: October 03, 2021, 08:57:04 PM »
How long until it cranks up ??

Hopefully some time this month  :)

Which will make Eric happy as he will use it as an excuse to get me to go and visit him so I can show it to him.... and he will then use it as an opportunity to try to sell me something ::)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline scc

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #57 on: October 03, 2021, 09:20:02 PM »
Nice detailed write ups again Jo,   Thank You        Terry :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #58 on: October 05, 2021, 04:08:02 PM »
Thank you Terry,

The crankshaft is simple:



It is two webs, a long shaped piece for the crank pin and a much longer piece for the main crankshaft. These have been Loctited then left over night. I have subsequently pinned them before cutting out the unwanted piece between the webs.

I also turned up the main bushes and slid them on the crankshaft along with the pulley and the flywheel. this left me with a desire for the connecting rod. The drawing doesn't make it totally clear as it just says made of brass and steel. Thankfully Anthony's write up explains which is which  :) There are two parts of 19mm square brass needed for the main bearing bit and two pieces of steel required for the arms. The arms having been drilled in three places need tapered sides:



And rounded ends. Giving us the three parts to make the connecting rod out of:



I should have mentioned I have painted the bearing surface with paint (I don't have any tippex ) to discourage the silver solder from sneaking in there  :paranoia: . Some high temperature flux has been added only where I want the silver solder to go   :paranoia:



And then off to solder it up...



It is now together. The good news is the screws that were holding it together through the crankshaft hole unscrewed nicely  :ThumbsUp: But I am going to leave it there for tonight as I have other things planned and I do not want to rush and get it wrong  :facepalm2:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jo

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Re: Bailey's 1881 Bee
« Reply #59 on: October 06, 2021, 04:31:07 PM »
Two holes drilled and reamed (not the right size  :wallbang: but corrected  ::) )



Mill the end down to 12mm, lots of filing then remember I still had not checked the cap still came off:



I don't think the feature is noticeable  :thinking: Putting it together with the other bits:



I don't want to have to make that bit ever again  :paranoia:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.