Author Topic: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig  (Read 4733 times)

Offline Mcgyver

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2019, 05:32:49 PM »
The 303 stainless cuts a lot like the 12L14 but doesn't rust so quick, I use it for most parts now.

303 is kind of the dream material, the only complaint is its only available locally in round bar so have you do a lot of whittling to get some shapes.

Quote
I didn't have too much trouble machining 304,

thats like the tale of new salesguy.  The old dogs prank him, telling him hey its first day, lets start with something easy.....just call on old Bob, easiest sale in the city.  Of course Bob is the meanest nastiest abusive prick in the city and he never buys.  New sales guy returns with a great big order of course - no one told him it couldn't be done!

I avoid 304 if I can.  The problem is it work hardens very easily, and when that happens its trouble.  Go slowly, wet, sharp tool, and never ever dwell - keep the tool cutting so its always under the work hardened zone

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2019, 05:39:56 PM »
Ha - that's brilliant. As it happens, what you described machining 304 is exactly what I did - but I did it by chance! It's great to have the background info though.

Of course - now I know that I'll tie myself in knots and create myself some difficulty.  ;D
« Last Edit: December 23, 2019, 05:44:38 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline Roger B

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2019, 08:23:31 PM »
Machining, unless you have all the information about your tooling and materials, is always an adventure  ::) Long thin pieces add an additional dimension  :headscratch: Just keep trying until you find something that works for your material and machines  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2019, 10:53:27 PM »
Looking at reply #10, where you are turning a fairly long piece of rod...

I've seen many posts about how much a part should stick out in relation to its diameter (with no other support) or with longer parts requiring a dead/live center.
But I'm wondering when a follower's use is dictated. Is there a rule of thumb for length, diameter, and material?
I've had instances where a long, small diameter part, simply bends in the middle as cutter pressure is applied.

Thanks. Hopefully I'm not hijacking.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2019, 11:36:26 PM »
Frankly, thatís the kind if question I was hoping to raise with these pictures. The part seemed to behave OK - but I did wonder about using a steady. Mine is a big clunky thing though, and would get in the way it seems. Iím thinking I need to obtain / make a smaller, more refoned steady.
Stuart

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2019, 06:17:15 PM »

But I'm wondering when a follower's use is dictated. Is there a rule of thumb for length, diameter, and material?
I've had instances where a long, small diameter part, simply bends in the middle as cutter pressure is applied.


I inspected the part this morning, and it is quite clear that the "chatter" marks were far worse in the center of the shaft. This was definitely a case where a steady would have been appropriate. Not sure what the rule of thumb is - maybe if the part is beyond the diameter / stick out ratio from either supported end to the middle, then use a steady.

My following steady is a great big thing - fine for larger diameter work, but it gets in the way on small parts, so I'll need to adapt a smaller steady, or just make one, because I anticipate making more slender parts like this.

Anyway, mostly finished part.



The thread was made with a die - I wasn't confident in getting a good thread without properly ground cutting tool and a follow rest.

I'm actually pretty happy with it, especially given input on machining mild steel. Learned a lot, got a successful part, I'll call it progress and make something else on Boxing day!

Now it's time to clean up and get ready for time with my wife and in laws, who are good folks and like a cocktail.  :DrinkPint:  :wine1:
Stuart

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2019, 12:17:39 AM »
More progress today. I milled the flats on to the three lead / lock screws, and made three aluminum / aluminium knobs.

I am really liking my collet chuck for parts like these.





The collets do not mark the parts like a 3 jaw does - although obviously strips of brass or similar can be used in the jawed chuck to eliminate that.

I drilled and tapped the knobs on the mill



Partial assembly of everything





Coming along now. The crossfeed screw traverses the block in the slot very nicely.

One thing about this fixture - it will work just fine, but having left so many components with stock edges, it looks a bit rough. Something to bear in mind for future bar stock engines - cleaning up all surfaces on a part definitely improves the look. Not critical for this though.

Anyway, getting a little further along. Quite enjoyed myself today.

Stuart

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2021, 08:34:47 PM »
Somewhat unbelievably, I actually finished this project today. I left it for ages because I obtained some insert tooling, which put off the need for hand ground tooling. However, this project sitting on my bench unfinished was starting to annoy me, plus I want to grind some profile tools, so I will have a use for it. Besides, it's an important skill to have, especially for the hobby machinist. Insert tools are good, but there are plenty of places where it seems a nice HSS tool is a better choice.

So - a few pics of the last remaining parts. Not too much explanation - it's all fairly basic stuff. 3 years ago when I started it was all very daunting, but with some practice in the meantime the last parts went quickly.

Side clamp bar - roughly centering using a gauge pin:



And then getting it precisely set:





Same with the other clamp bar - this was the absolute maximum I could extend the jaw on this chuck. If the part was longer I would have just had to use a faceplate.



Gives you an idea of the set up:



Then I chamfered the clamp bars for a little more tilt angle capability:



I actually then had a flash of inspiration, and shortened the longer clamp bar, and slotted it. I have this magnetic base hanging around doing nothing - it was 10 dollars or so from Grizzly - so I decided to mount a couple of steel plates by the grinder, and mount the rest to the magnetic base.

And voila!





The old rest bracket still has to be removed from the bench grinder, but you get the idea.



I have a different grinding wheel to put on the left side, but the point here is that it will be very easy to  move the grinding rest to either wheel.



So there we are - something actually finished. Just need to remove the remaining rendundant brackets from the grinder, and it will be ready to try out. Also need to make some holders for smaller bits.
Stuart

Offline Kim

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2021, 09:33:20 PM »
That is pretty cool!

You'll have to let us know how the magnetic holder works out.

Kim

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2021, 10:24:26 PM »
Nice work Stuart, that looks like it will be pretty handy.

Dave

Offline Zephyrin

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2021, 09:44:39 AM »
you will certainly be very happy using this sharpening device, and especially the tools sharpened with it! nothing beats a freshly sharpened lathe tool...

but the grinding wheel dressing tool put on the bench grinder generates a considerable amount of abrasive dust, so be careful.

Offline propforward

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Re: Basic Tool Sharpening Jig
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2021, 05:39:02 PM »
Thank you all. I am looking forward to trying this. I need to cut a few angle templates to aid in set up, then I'll try it out. So far the magnetic holder seems plenty solid, no sign of being able to shove it around when the magnet is turned "on", so I feel good about it - need to try it for real though.

It's a bit of a chunky looking thing - the original design is a little more refined looking, but this made use of some material I had on hand. Essentially the same design as Harold Halls though.

Good point on the grinding dust Zephyrin. I actually moved the grinder out of my "clean" shop, into the other area where I keep my welders and band saw, and bar stock. Just to keep those processes separated a bit from the precision tools.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2021, 07:09:33 PM by propforward »
Stuart