Author Topic: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine  (Read 2145 times)

Offline pgp001

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 784
  • West Yorkshire - UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2021, 09:08:53 AM »
This is the one for "Agnes" that I have drawn in Solidworks, all measurements taken from the full size engine.

Phil



Offline pieterb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 31
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2021, 07:42:42 PM »
Tug, David, Phil,

Thank you for the info. Are the bearings in any way secured to avoid side (left-right) movement or is the only way they are secured by the wedge?

Greetings

Pieter

Offline pgp001

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 784
  • West Yorkshire - UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2021, 08:55:51 PM »
Hi

On mine the shells have a flange at either end to prevent side to side movement, and the outer ones at each end have a dowel peg to prevent them rotating in the con rod.

Phil

Offline deltatango

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 318
  • Melbourne, Australia
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2021, 05:30:08 AM »
The Southworth drawings show them located by friction only so that is how I made them. How this works out won't be known for a long time :(

Here is a picture from a real one made by Galloway's of Manchester and currently in the Science and Industry Museum there:



the acrylic cover made photography difficult but you can see the flanges that Galloways used clearly.

David
Don't die wondering!

Offline Ramon

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1927
  • Suffolk in the UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2021, 08:14:40 AM »
Hi Pieter, there are several ways the rear engine bearings were held but like DT I was not sure that without some restriction sideways movement might occur.

In the book 'Elements of Steam Engineering I found a drawing of full size practice. Unfortunately I can't scan so perhaps someone with a similar copy could help - it's on page 134.

The rear part of the bearing has flanges top and bottom on one side only - the rear face has flanges on both sides to locate the bearing on the conrod.

The front tapered part of the bearing has flanges top and bottom but the front face on one side only.

The wedge of course is securely located by the bolt

Hope that describes it well enough.

Tug
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline PeterH

  • Jr. member
  • **
  • Posts: 1
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2021, 05:07:47 PM »

Offline pieterb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 31
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2021, 08:44:18 PM »
Thank you all for the great information and tips. I will do a small design change according original design in the book Elements of Steam Engineering.

I downloaded the book and will go true it but I was looking on the net for some more info and I found this site:

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/library-download/8-category/129-library-steam-engines

There are a lot of books on steam engine......lots of reading  :thinking: :thinking:


To the engine again: the main bearings exist out of 3 parts, bottom bearing half is in 2 pieces and a single piece to half. I suppose the bearings have a ring running over the schaft, picking up the oil in the bottom of the bearing house (I don't know the name in english but we have lots of them at work). Can someone confirm the bearings are constructed like this? I can't find the rings on the drawings, that's why I ask it.

Greetings

Pieter

Offline Ramon

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1927
  • Suffolk in the UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2021, 08:49:53 PM »
Thanks for that link Pieter.

As drawn the rings are for collecting oil as you say. Three piece bearings are more to full size practice so the choice is yours - I just went for split two piece and left out the oiling rings because I intended to make the oil aquariums

Tug
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline pgp001

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 784
  • West Yorkshire - UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2021, 10:23:43 PM »
Agnes has a three piece main bearing on the bedplate, the model engine also has this feature.

On the drawing at points A & B there were thin wood strips fitted on the full size engine, mine has been machined to fit without the use of wood strips.

Phil


Online Jasonb

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7841
  • Surrey, UK
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2021, 07:46:35 AM »
Pieter, if you follow this thread you can see some oil rings being made, fitted and on the next page a video of them working

https://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,9323.msg228000.html#msg228000

Offline pieterb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 31
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2021, 08:33:35 AM »
Jason: your setup of bearings and oil rings is the correct one. The bearing lower part should be 1 piece, with the oil ring in the middle. The turning shaft will pick up oil and keep the shaft oiled, and the rotation will bring the oil under the shaft. The only thing that I would ad to your design is a oil pocket in the lenght of the bearing (over the complete length, just not on the last 3mm on each side. This way the oil is easely distributed over the whole length but does not escape to easy on the bearing ends.This is how it is done in real life. I added a cutout of a drawing from a bearing I recently worked on. i marked the oil pocket.

Now the Julius design has the bottom bearing half cut in two to make room for the oil ring. I think it is useless in this way. I think I will just make a 2 piece bearing to start with and if I find the courage maybe change the design to something more sophisticated....


In real life these oil rings (that I have seen already) are made so that they can be opened to (dis)assemble. They have hinge and a lock. Quite a challenge to make for a 24mm shaft....
I will give a training at work on high pressure pumps next week. This pump has these oil rings. I will take some pictures when it is disassembled to show what I mean.

greetings

Offline pieterb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 31
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2021, 07:55:27 PM »
Hello from snowy  :lolb: :lolb: (2,5 cm) Belgium,

yes there is snow outside, so time to heat the shop and do some machining.

I finished the connection rod and the bearing stands

I also cut some bronze to make the main bearing parts. The bearings came out nice but are not finished yet. I will make the grove in the upper part and the oil hole tommorow but I will have to grind a cutter first.

The shaft fits nice but it will need some fine tuning when the bearings are completly finished. I will probably put some ground pins in the bearings to keep them in place.


A general question: how can I insert the pictures between the text? I only see the "attachments" but then they appear below the text...

Greetings


Online Kim

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4557
  • Portland, Oregon, USA
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2021, 08:15:04 PM »
Hello from snowy  :lolb: :lolb: (2,5 cm) Belgium,

yes there is snow outside, so time to heat the shop and do some machining.

A general question: how can I insert the pictures between the text? I only see the "attachments" but then they appear below the text...

You're making some great progress Pieter!  And glad you are getting to enjoy some snow.  We haven't had any this winter yet, but we still may.

As for getting your pictures inline with the text - It's not hard, but it does require a bit more effort.   To do this, you have to host your photos at some external site.  Then, you embed a link to your photo in the body of your message using the URL tags:

          [ url] http://link_to_my_photo [ /url]

For the above, I have included a space between the opening bracket and the url tag, because if I didn't it would try to embed that link as a real image and it wouldn't work because that link is made up, of course.

Many people used to use Photo Bucket to host their images (including me).  But a couple of years ago Photo Bucket changed their policy and started blocking images to the free accounts.  This broke many people's photo links.  So most of us don't use photo bucket anymore. But there are many other photo-hosting sites that people do use.

It takes a bit more effort to embed your photos in your text, but to me, it is worth it.  I much prefer to read posts with the images embedded.  Makes it more interesting and easier to follow. That's my opinion only, so take it for what its worth!

Hope this helps,
Kim

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12162
  • Rochester NY
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2021, 08:25:49 PM »
If you have this setting turned on in your forum profile,  "Show WYSIWYG editor on post page by default." then you will see a whole lot of little icons when posting. If you click on this one:

then it will put up a little box for you to paste the url of the photo on the hosting site, and clicking okay after pasting will put in the tags that Kim showed. Both ways work fine, just personal preference.

Offline pieterb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 31
Re: Julius De Waal Corliss steam engine
« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2021, 08:32:59 PM »
Thank you for the info, I found the icon to insert a link bur didn't know how it worked. Can you give some examples of hosting websites that work well? At the moment I only have google photos but I think this doesn't work...