Model Engine Maker

Engines => From Kits/Castings => Topic started by: J.L. on September 30, 2019, 01:15:50 PM

Title: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on September 30, 2019, 01:15:50 PM
The Picket Boat No. 1 has been built countless times and the construction threads posted often on the Nautical Research Guild's Ship World Forum.
But I wish to begin with the construction of the steam power machinery for the boat.  The engine was probably built by the Clute Bro's Co. of Schenectady, New York. The Clute brothers were one of the country's earliest manufacturers of steam power machinery. They built steam locomotion for marine use as well as railroad engines.

This engine is a single cylinder condensing type of approximately 7" stroke and a piston diameter of 8".

The scale is 1:24

The kit is offered by Model Shipways.


 
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on September 30, 2019, 01:23:15 PM
Great to see you back on another new project and this one looks to be a most interesting one!!

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on September 30, 2019, 01:27:22 PM
Thanks Bill.

It's good to be back.

This steam launch was engaged in perhaps the most famous naval engagement of the Civil War.

More details on that later. You can actually read much of its history on the lid of the kit box in the first photo.

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on September 30, 2019, 01:38:05 PM
Great looking boat, watching along!   :popcorn:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mklotz on September 30, 2019, 03:09:03 PM
It's great to see you back, John.  I always follow your builds closely and this one promises to be great fun.  In my youth I built a number of ship models so your subject is close to my heart. 
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Roger B on September 30, 2019, 06:52:30 PM
Good to see you back  :) Your attention to detail is amazing  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Dave Otto on October 01, 2019, 12:35:26 AM
Welcome back John,
looking forward to following along with your new project.

Dave
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: gbritnell on October 01, 2019, 02:42:20 AM
Having built a couple of plank on frame boats I can't wait to see this one develop. I'm sure it will be first rate as all your projects have been.
gbritnell
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Larry on October 01, 2019, 03:31:14 AM
Great to see you back. Your build logs are an inspiration.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: derekwarner on October 01, 2019, 03:35:02 AM
Yes JL.......

Will look forward to your new/latest build......the words steam + plank on frame are sweet music to many.............. :bandrock:

Derek
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Art K on October 01, 2019, 03:44:05 AM
John,
I have to admit my ship building days in my youth included cutting off a fiber glass planter, aluminum bow and liberal application of sealing grout topped off with an electric motor. I will enjoy something a bit more sophisticated. Count me in.
Art
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: jeff l on October 01, 2019, 03:48:19 AM
John , Great to see you back.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 01, 2019, 12:44:20 PM
Thank you gentlemen for the warm welcome back. In my absence I tried my hand at building a Royal Navy Longboat 'Medway'. Learned a alot about plank on frame.

This build begins rather modestly with wooden parts and a bit of aluminum tubing.  Many could turn up their noses at the concept of building a steam engine with wooden parts. But for me, it brings my model making full circle. My introduction to building metal engines began when I was paper modelling. To strengthen the paper parts, I wrapped the paper around wooden reinforcing cores. Here are some shots of Bertschy's vertical paper engine.

With this model, wooden parts are clad with card stock and photo etched brass.


Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 01, 2019, 12:58:18 PM
Because I was woodturning at the time, reinforcing circular parts was easy.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 01, 2019, 03:49:17 PM
This is going to be a great build John.

Which Medway Longboat kit did you build? I've been following the group builds over on the Nautical Research site of the kits from Syren Ship Model Company.

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 01, 2019, 04:55:13 PM
Hi Jim,
I am a member of that group. I built Chuck's 1/2" scale Medway.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mike mott on October 01, 2019, 05:49:14 PM
Beautiful build of the longboat John, I am also a member of the Model Ship Word forum My model of the 19 foot launch with the buffalo Marine engine is in waiting mode at the moment. I look forward to following along with your new build.

Mike
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 01, 2019, 07:57:30 PM
Hi Jim,
I am a member of that group. I built Chuck's 1/2" scale Medway.

Very nice John.  :ThumbsUp: Did you do a build thread over there?

Mike are you still working on that huge model of the cutter? I stalled out on my Generic Sharpie project, but hope to get back to it soon.

Jim

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mike mott on October 01, 2019, 08:11:28 PM
Jim, Yes I am it is never far from my mind.

Mike
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 03, 2019, 03:10:57 PM
Hi Jim,
No, posting another Medway thread there would be like sawing sawdust. I stayed in the bushes and built this one as my first try at ship modelling.

The wooden cylinder  and valve chamber are now clad with paper and etched brass. The piston rod slides freely in an aluminum 1/16" tube.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 05, 2019, 06:16:11 PM
The pillow blocks, crankshaft, connecting rod and piston rod are quite small. A clever design was used for the shafting. It's tubing, not rod. So the crankshaft has an alignment tube running straight through the counterbalanced cranks and can later be withdrawn.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Admiral_dk on October 05, 2019, 08:17:01 PM
Glad to see you back with a new build John  :whoohoo:

Great idea with the tubes for the crank  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 07, 2019, 04:08:31 PM
Thanks.

The tubing for this model comes in a nice plastic tube. The sizes are 1/16", 3/32" and 1/8" - all telescopic.

I was not impresssed however with the option of slicing off little pieces of hex plastic rod to represent bolt heads. Actually studs and nuts were the norm when bolting machiery to a floor.

Therefore, I made my own false fasteners by threading steel rod #0-80 for studs and using steel hex nuts. I'd like to not paint them. They look so realistic formed up the way they are, but I'm sure that in a marine setting they would have been painted.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 08, 2019, 01:28:55 PM
The engine is almost complete. I am awaiting #0-80 hex bolts to simulate fastening the top of the frame around the cylinder.

The model has a lot of details for its size - the Stephenson linkage in particular. The expansion link and the forward and reverse eccentrics were photo etched. But attaching the sheeves in the center of the eccentrics was interesting. They were sandwiched between two larger disks of 1/64" wood. To keep the offset holes aligned, there was a little hole in each for a pin. It kept all three disks aligned.

The feed pump and the sea water pump were cast.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 08, 2019, 02:51:22 PM
The Model Shipways kit came with a piece of 1/2" dowel, intended for the boiler chimney.

Upon furthur investigation, I found out that it was also intended for the body of the condenser. I just can't see using wooden dowel on this model. It is very difficult to get it to look like metal and the chinney would be solid!

So a length of 1/2" brass tubing was purchased.

Here are some of the parts of the condenser.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on October 08, 2019, 07:55:31 PM
Looking great John. I think all you alternate material choices ( bolts, chimney, etc.) are great and will definitely add to the realism of the model. Still following along and looking forward to the hull construction.

Bill
Title: The Boiler
Post by: J.L. on October 09, 2019, 07:16:41 PM
Thanks Bill.
Great minds think alike, or so I've been told.
Making this false boiler out of wood reminds me of the boiler I made for the textile mill.
A trip down memory lane...
Title: The Picket Boiler
Post by: J.L. on October 09, 2019, 07:18:50 PM
So here is the boiler for the steam launch - again made out of wood with metal fittings:
The cladding was very important here to protect the crew.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Admiral_dk on October 09, 2019, 08:39:25 PM
Quote
The cladding was very important here to protect the crew.

Amen to that, and in more ways than one, as fire on a boat / ship, is one of the absolutely worst things that can happen. You are not that far into the build yet John, but I would not be surprised if the full size had several safety measures, a la a metal plate around the fire door to the boiler and under the ash crate, etc.

Best wishes

Per
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 09, 2019, 10:10:43 PM
Thank you Per (am I addresing you correctly?)

This launch would be the last place I would want to be even if not involved in an engagement.  There is a heavy 12 pounder Dahlgren howitzer sitting on the bow, a spar torpedo hanging off the starboard thwart, sparks flying about from the stack (even if there was a spark arrester) and bags of explosive powder stored with the coal.

Yes a lot of metal plate makes sense to me as well.

More on the armament late.

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Admiral_dk on October 10, 2019, 11:37:20 AM
Quote
Thank you Per (am I addresing you correctly?)

Yes - my given name is Per  :)

A very Danish name, and there are a few other Scandinavian derivatives, like Peer, Pär, in Norway and Sweeden.

You are right - it does NOT sound like a very healthy environment  :ShakeHead:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 11, 2019, 10:30:36 AM
The steam dome is clad with 1/8" x 1/32" basswood.
Title: Steam Dome
Post by: J.L. on October 11, 2019, 03:20:22 PM
A special jig was made to hold the thin top of the steam dome. One pre-drilled hole is for the safety valve; the other for the steam pipe that will run to the valve chamber of the engine.

I think the gentle curve on the dome would be difficult to produce without a lathe.



Title: The Boiler
Post by: J.L. on October 13, 2019, 04:17:26 PM
The boiler shell with steam dome, steam outlet pipe and safety valve is complete.

A Jig was used to keep the legs steady while the shell could be rotated plumb before the expxy glue set.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on October 14, 2019, 12:25:10 AM
Even if it's a faux boiler, it sure looks the part John. Nicely done.

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 14, 2019, 03:24:05 PM
Thanks Bill.

The aft end of the boiler is complete. It features a check valve and a sight glass. I couldn't find acrylic rod or tube 3/32" dia. so went with a silvered tube of aluminum.

I couldn't see pasting a paper dial on a piece of round basswood. A brass housing seemed in order for the pressure gauge.  You can see where the paper dial got a little bit scrunched when pressed into position. The original paper dial supplied was reduced to 94% to keep the overall diameter of the guage to scale with the brass surround.

This is where a small metal lathe really comes into its own.
 
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 14, 2019, 03:56:17 PM
The forward boiler end is made up of the fire door and brass etched fittings, the smoke hood and the chimney.

The trick with the smoke hood was to fill the grain and finish the surface so that it looked as though it were constructed  from sheet metal.
It is made up of seven parts.

The four eyebolts in the reinforced chimney are for guy wires or cables that will be affixed to the covering boards above the bulkheads of the boat.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Adam G on October 14, 2019, 06:20:46 PM
 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
Title: Steam Plant
Post by: J.L. on October 14, 2019, 06:32:10 PM
The propulsion system for the Picket Boat is now complete. The engine is a simple cylinder consensing type of approximately 7" stroke and a piston diameter of 8". These steam engines were high torque slow revolving devices which swung a large high pitch propeller ( probably between 36" and 42") which reached about 150 revolutions per minute.

It is at this point that I must ask permission from MEM to proceed with the construction of the steam launch. This is a model engine making forum and what I will be doing now is basically ship modelling - not the mandate of this site.

John

P.S. I didn't know what a hot well was. It's the little box in the photos. It received the condensed water and was designed to separate any oil in the water before sending the water back to the boiler.


Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 14, 2019, 11:19:46 PM
I see no reason not to continue with the rest of the build here - I spent two years making a steam shovel here with no engine work for the first year! We love all kinds of models, and always learn something from the other types. I'd say go for it!   :cheers:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 14, 2019, 11:36:01 PM
If it doesn't stay here, I would think it would fit in the "Vehicles and Models" section just fine. I always enjoy your build threads John.  :ThumbsUp:

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: MJM460 on October 15, 2019, 06:55:27 AM
Hi John, I think a boat is a perfectly good vehicle for a steam engine, and will be keen to learn how you approach the hull.  My vote is for you to keep posting.

Besides, if you keep hanging around here, we might even talk you into replacing that boiler and engine with the real thing.

Beautiful workmanship as always.

MJM460
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 15, 2019, 04:36:13 PM
Thank you all for your input.

I will carry on here. We can then mount the steam plant with its drive shaft and propeller and mount a 12 pounder Dahlgren howitzer on the foredeck knowing a little bit of the hul's construction.

Some of the parts are pre-stained and painted. It's like building the hull from the inside out.  :)

The long gray bits in the photo are the tops of the coal bins, Actually with shallow draft and almost straight sides the strakes should be easier to mount on the bulwarks.

I may eat those words as we proceed!
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 16, 2019, 01:37:29 PM
The keel and bulwarks of the hull are made from sheets of basswood, not plywood. I have read that plywood frames are more prone to warping.
Nevertheless, steel parallels were used to secure a strip of wood along the bottom of the keel to form a rabbet.

In the other two photos you will notice horizontal slots aong the sten. These will form the channel for the propeller shaft once their webs are cut out.

The overall shape of the hull's skeleton here reminds me of a container ship; bow section, stern section and a long flat section midships.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 16, 2019, 02:58:54 PM
Looking good John.  :ThumbsUp:

I see that the Picket Boat is 1:24th scale, but haven't been able to determine just how long the model actually is?

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 16, 2019, 04:32:33 PM
Hi Jim,
You are right; 1:24.

The overall length of the steam launch is 22 1/2". Its width is 5".

I have made only one ship previous to this one, but from what I read, fairing is usually done when the bulwarks are glued in place on the keel. The buwarks can then be 'faired' to follow the curve of the ship.

This model is constructed in a different way. The fore and aft bulwarks are faired before they are glued into place.

How? Kudos to the designer Bob Crane for showing the bevel  lines right on the bulwarks. They have been deternimed in CAD and laser engraved into the frame.

Note also that the location of the strakes have also been laser engraved.  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 16, 2019, 05:43:08 PM
Hi Jim,
You are right; 1:24.

The overall length of the steam launch is 22 1/2". Its width is 5".

I have made only one ship previous to this one, but from what I read, fairing is usually done when the bulwarks are glued in place on the keel. The buwarks can then be 'faired' to follow the curve of the ship.

This model is constructed in a different way. The fore and aft bulwarks are faired before they are glued into place.

How? Kudos to the designer Bob Crane for showing the bevel  lines right on the bulwarks. They have been deternimed in CAD and laser engraved into the frame.

Note also that the location of the strakes have also been laser engraved.  :ThumbsUp:

Thanks John,

That is a nice size boat model. Much easier to work with. I've had the Model Shipways model of Howard Chapelle's pinky schooner "Glad Tidings" for years that is on the someday list. It's also 1:24 scale.

Took me a bit to understand what you were talking about until I figured out that you're talking about "bulkheads" not "bulwarks" (or "moulds" as they're sometimes called). That really is a well thought out kit. Now you just need to build a miniature "ships bandsaw" to saw them to shape.  :)

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 16, 2019, 06:55:44 PM
Hi Jim,
Yes, 1/2" to the foot is very nice.

Sorry about the terminology. I've learned something there.

To angle the 'bulkheads', I'm using a belt sander that has a table that will tip up. You have to be able to see the engraved lines to determine the angle. If I can't tip the table any more, I'll make a wooden angled table to clamp to the existing sanding table.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mklotz on October 16, 2019, 07:15:21 PM
Rather than build an angled table, buy one of these...

https://www.amazon.com/Mayes-10156-Protractor-Angle-Finder/dp/B002Q7B7XE/ref=sr_1_59?crid=ZCRUCZZQDUJ9&keywords=angle+finder&qid=1571249495&sprefix=angle+%2Caps%2C226&sr=8-59

You will find other uses for it around the house.  No batteries required.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 16, 2019, 07:55:39 PM
Hi Marv,
Thanks for the suggestion. Good instrument.

But it wouldn't work here. Yoy need to build a table that starts you off at a severe angle,

Like this...

Now I have infinite control over the angle by watching the laser burned edge of the part, watch the cut and change the angle by eye unit the lower edge of the burnt edge disappears.
Title: Fairing
Post by: J.L. on October 16, 2019, 08:29:41 PM
The result.
You can still see the engraved lines. I think I'll leave them. In the end, there probably will be some tweaking with a sandpaper block anyway to sweeten the curves of the overall hull.
Title: The Cockpit
Post by: J.L. on October 18, 2019, 12:46:53 PM
1.  The floor

2. The seats
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Art K on October 18, 2019, 04:26:49 PM
J.L.
Looks great, don't think I ever watched a model boat go together before.
Art
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on October 18, 2019, 04:33:47 PM
Great stuff as always John. May have to try one of these ship models one day.

Bill

Title: Midships
Post by: J.L. on October 18, 2019, 08:49:48 PM
Hi Art,
What I'm doing so far is fun. It's when we get to the planking that things get a little squirrelly if you don't have experiene with it.  And I don't!  ;D

Hi Bill,
If you do, go for someting in large scale.  ;)

The floor and the coal bunkers...

P.S. The smudges are coal dust. May use some more of that 4B pencil.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 18, 2019, 09:31:23 PM
I'm a little surprised they have you do the interior parts before the planking, I usually do the planking first so I can run clamps around the frames. Lots of ways to do every job!
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Art K on October 18, 2019, 09:36:49 PM
John,
Good thing for you, now you are going to get that experience.
Art
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 18, 2019, 10:19:20 PM
You are right Chris. But the design of this boat means that there is very little to the bulkheads. They snap so easily.  There is basically nothing to them along the keel midships with the deep cut for the steam plant.

I think that is why they want the floors to support the frames. The bunkers help as well.

No problems fore though. the bulkheads are solid.

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 18, 2019, 10:54:28 PM
You are right Chris. But the design of this boat means that there is very little to the bulkheads. They snap so easily.  There is basically nothing to them along the keel midships with the deep cut for the steam plant.

I think that is why they want the floors to support the frames. The bunkers help as well.

No problems fore though. the bulkheads are solid.

John
That makes sense!    :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 19, 2019, 03:45:59 PM
Hi Chris,

I reread the reasons for workig from the inside out and found a sentence that summarizes our discussion well:

"The structure has now gained considerable strength and stiffness and is ready for planking."

Bob Crane, 2010


Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on October 19, 2019, 04:13:34 PM
That is looking great John  :ThumbsUp:

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 19, 2019, 04:38:55 PM
Coming along nicely John.  :ThumbsUp:

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 19, 2019, 07:27:25 PM
Looking great!!
Title: The Rudder Post
Post by: J.L. on October 19, 2019, 07:35:26 PM
Thanks guys.

This shot gives up a look at a number of things.

First, a 1/8" bearing is placed just behind the last bulkhead #18. In it, a 3/32" rudder post drops down and rests in a notch in the keel extension. I was pleased to see it line up nicely.

Second, you can see the engraved lines on bulkhead #18 for the stern planks.

Lastly, you can see the raceway for the propeller shaft.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: wagnmkr on October 21, 2019, 12:14:29 PM
You are doing your usual masterful job John. This will be another winner!

Cheers

Tom
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mike mott on October 21, 2019, 03:31:29 PM
The framing looks great John, looking forward to seeing the planking.

Mike
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 21, 2019, 08:28:42 PM
Well Mike, planking.is not one of my strong suits. If this armed vessel didn't have steam and ordinance aboard, I doubt if I'd be building it.

This is not a pretty picture, ::) but it shows the garboard planks starting on each side of the keel. They fit into a rabbet above the false keel strips aded to each side of the main keel.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on October 21, 2019, 08:46:00 PM
Looks like a good start John.

How did the planking go on your Medway Longboat build? Aren't they pre-spiled or something?

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 21, 2019, 09:35:09 PM
Jim, you are right. All the planks o the Medway longboat were pre-spiled.
That boat was a rebound from attempting to make a Russia brig in 1:64 scale. I just came upon it and jumped at the large scale.
Although the planks on this model are not pre-spiled, the engraved location marks make the build much easier than having to mark out everything by hand with the use of battens,

I'd better get this boat planked quickly or I'll be kicked off this site.  ::)


Title: Doing the "Twist"
Post by: J.L. on October 22, 2019, 02:17:00 PM
This one is for all of us old dudes who remember "The Twist".

P.S. To keep this thread on MEM theme, you can still see the propeller shaft raceway coming from the steam engine's power takeoff.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Roger B on October 23, 2019, 05:18:04 PM
Still following along and enjoying your attention to detail  :praise2:  :wine1: You are definitely a model engine maker and I see no problem in keeping this on the forum.

In one of the German model engineering magazines someone is 3D printing a replica of a Wankel model aircraft engine. It will obviously not run, but is it a model engine?
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 23, 2019, 06:06:01 PM
John, did you have to steam or heat bend the garboard plank to take that twist?
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on October 23, 2019, 09:13:31 PM
Thanks Roger. I can't answer your question. Sounds interesting though.

Hi Chris,
Thanks for asking. I put the plank in a Mason Jar and poured in boiling water. After 7 minutes, I took the part out of the water and clamped its end to my workbench (extra material was anticipated for the clamp). Then I took my wife's hairdryer and blew hot air onto the plank as I twisted it slowly with a pair of flat nosed parallel pliers.  After a few minutes, the plank was almost dry. There was some spring back but the wood was still quite malleable.

I immediately glued it in place: edge - white glue; bulkhead- thick gel CA.

I probably should be using the brown gap filling glue that has solid content in it. But the hull is going to be filled with a thin coat of filler and sanded. The filler will cover a multitude of sins!  ::)
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on October 23, 2019, 09:25:12 PM
Nice! I have used the hot water method, also sometimes used the side of a soldering iron and wetted the area of the wood - this is essentially the same thing that instrument makers do, where they have a alcohol lamp heating a curved copper piece. A long time ago I got a electric bender, basically a soldering iron with a shaped end piece, looks sort of like this one:
https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/am7205-amati-electric-plank-bender.html
By wetting the section of wood, and pulling it onto the hot iron, it locally steams the wood. To get a tighter bend, takes a few applications. I bet Steam Guy Willy still has some of the alcohol lamp versions in a toolbox...
Title: The Last Plank
Post by: J.L. on October 30, 2019, 07:14:49 PM
Chris, I don't use it often but Amati makes a mechanical plank bender. Its plastic anvil is canted so that when you squeeze the handles the blade scores the underside and the plank begins to bend.

You can't use this device where the inside of the plank is seen though. The score lines would be visable. But it's a great time saver when double planking or the underside is hidden below decks.

There are 13 strakes in this hull. Each strake has between three and four planks.

One plank to go...   :whoohoo:
Title: Fantail Stern
Post by: J.L. on November 01, 2019, 01:38:27 PM
The fantail stern on this boat is difficult to frame and plank, so the designer cut to the chase and provided three solid pieces to shape the stern.

The rudder post was put in place to correctly position the fantail planking.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Ye-Ole Steam Dude on November 01, 2019, 02:30:08 PM
Hello John,

That is going to be a beautiful hull/boat and enjoying this build.

Have a great day,
Thomas
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 01, 2019, 07:15:08 PM
Thanks Thomas,

I'm beginning to enjoy this build as well now that the planking is finished. Looking forward to getting that steam plant aboard.

The bow deck adds much to the look of the model. The covering boards will also add a lot when they are mounted to cover the bulkhead ends.

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Admiral_dk on November 01, 2019, 07:56:39 PM
The boat is really starting to take shape now John and we get an idea about the finished shape  :cheers:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on November 01, 2019, 08:11:21 PM
Still following along John. It's really coming together nicely!!!

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: mike mott on November 02, 2019, 01:07:20 PM
Nice, once the cover boards are installed it will look a lot more solid as well.

Mike
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 02, 2019, 05:42:10 PM
Thanks Guys.

Yes Mike, the covering boards went in quite well and, as you say, strengthened the hull.

The trim boards also added a lot. Not only did they cover the edge of the covering boards, they cast nice shadows under the edge.
Title: The Rudder Assembly
Post by: J.L. on November 02, 2019, 05:50:06 PM
Wise use of the telescopic aluminum tubing is used on this model. The sizes are 1/8, 3/32 and 1/16".

The bearings are made from the 1/8" size. The rudder is attached to a 2" piece of 3/32" tube. It was suggested to use a pin to secure the lower end to the keel, but I chose to make a bearing out of the 1/8" size.

The 1/16" tube is glued into the rudder shaft to secure the top end in place and run up to the tiller.

You can see that a little more filler is in order in a couple of spots on the hull.
Title: The Propeller Shaft Raceway
Post by: J.L. on November 02, 2019, 05:54:08 PM
But before the rudder can be fastened in place, I wanted to ensure that the propeller raceway was free and clear.

A 1/8" aircraft drill did the job. I was pleased to see it come into the bulkhead dead on. Hopefully it will be at the steam engine's takeoff fitting height.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 02, 2019, 08:26:25 PM
Now that's some accurate drilling John! Love the drill.............I have a couple of those myself.

This project is really coming along. :ThumbsUp:

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 02, 2019, 09:46:00 PM
Hi Jim,

Thanks. Yes, those longer drills are wonderful.

I'm not really that good with drilling that hole Jim. It was already laser cut prior to framing. The webs were also cut out once the slot was reinforced. I was just making sure the raceway was clear and good to go.

Cheers...John
Title: The Rudder
Post by: J.L. on November 03, 2019, 01:46:41 AM
The rudder tapers fore to aft. The round groove at its back edge to accommodate the rudder shaft was milled on the milling machine.

It just didn't look right having this rudder appear to be one large piece of wood. It probably was made up of boards jointed together, cut to a pattern and reinforced with iron straps.

A small thing that probably won't be seen at all from viewing distance, but it was enjoyable to go through its construction mentally as if you were building it and make it appear that way.  :)

I think that's why many of us enjoy modelling so much.
Title: Re: The Rudder
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 03, 2019, 01:52:18 AM
The rudder tapers fore to aft. The round groove at its back edge to accommodate the rudder shaft was milled on the milling machine.

It just didn't look right having this rudder appear to be one large piece of wood. It probably was made up of boards jointed together, cut to a pattern and reinforced with iron straps.

A small thing that probably won't be seen at all from viewing distance, but it was enjoyable to go through its construction mentally as if you were building it and make it appear that way.  :)

I think that's why many of us enjoy modelling so much.

I agree John. It's those details that change a model from a nice model to an excellent model! Well done.

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 03, 2019, 08:57:07 PM
Thanks Jim.

The third coat of paint has been applied to the hull. I'm rather glad that I did not go overboard (sorry for the pun) with filler on this hull. The grain of the planks and the seams still show through and there are imperfections here and there.

Otherwise, I would have wound up with a 'plastic' looking smooth hull.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: steamer on November 03, 2019, 08:58:34 PM
That's a pretty hull shape!.....Nice tight turn of the bilge amidships as well.....

Dave
Title: The Gun Carriage
Post by: J.L. on November 04, 2019, 05:50:56 PM
Hi Dave.

I agree. The model is 22" long and 5" wide. I paticularly like the fantail stern and the long slender bow.

While the mineral paint is hardening on the hull, let's turn our attention to the armament. The gun carriage requires some shaping. The instructions call for 'carving the carriage bed. I shudder. This is where the milling machine really comes into its own when working with wood.

The sides of the carriage are angled about ten degrees. Lines are engraved on the bed of the carriage to determine the angle.
Also, the ends of the bed have to be cut down to allow reinforcing plates to lie flat with the surface of the bed. The trunion plates are fastened with twelve pins.


Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 04, 2019, 05:59:45 PM
Very nice John.  :ThumbsUp:

That last post brings a whole new meaning to the term "lumber mill"!  :Lol:

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 05, 2019, 12:54:21 PM
Yes Jim, I guess this project could be called 'Run of the mill".  ::)

Model Shipways tried to lighten the builder's task by pre-drilling the howitzer's mounting lug.

I wish they hadn't.  :ThumbsDown:

It's the first flaw I've seen in this otherwise well designed kit.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: cnr6400 on November 05, 2019, 02:28:37 PM
Oh! that hole in the gun lug is bad!  :facepalm:

I'm sure some epoxy, and maybe some brass tubing set on true alignment to the gun will teach it some manners. Great progress on the project so far John.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Title: The Gun Carriage
Post by: J.L. on November 05, 2019, 08:26:43 PM
Thanks.

Yes, the J&B Weld is drying in the offending hole.

This Dahlgren Howitzer is mounted to the deck by a pin through plates attached to the deck. There were three pivot points arranged in an equilateral triangle on the deck. This was a very awkward arrangement. I've seen diagrams of later Dahlgrens that were mounted in the centre and rotated through 360 degrees by means of small metal wheels running of a circular track set into the deck.

This arrangement was very awkward and took a lot of brute force and manpower to reload. Because it was muzzle loaded, the gun had to be turned around to be reloaded. The rear of the carriage was swung to either port or starboard attachment point. The front pin was removed and placed in one of these pivot points. Then the gun could be swung so that it turned 180 degrees. It could then be reloaded and the process reversed to return to firing position.

Imagine doing this in close action! In an engagement, you probably had one shot and that was it. More about the actual firing of this howitzer in the attack on the Confederate C.S.S. Albermarie later.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: wagnmkr on November 06, 2019, 12:45:12 AM
Good job on all the wee parts John. This will be another excellent model.

Cheers

Tom
Title: Re: The Gun Carriage
Post by: steamer on November 06, 2019, 01:06:46 AM
Thanks.

Yes, the J&B Weld is drying in the offending hole.

This Dahlgren Howitzer is mounted to the deck by a pin through plates attached to the deck. There were three pivot points arranged in an equilateral triangle on the deck. This was a very awkward arrangement. I've seen diagrams of later Dahlgrens that were mounted in the centre and rotated through 360 degrees by means of small metal wheels running of a circular track set into the deck.

This arrangement was very awkward and took a lot of brute force and manpower to reload. Because it was muzzle loaded, the gun had to be turned around to be reloaded. The rear of the carriage was swung to either port or starboard attachment point. The front pin was removed and placed in one of these pivot points. Then the gun could be swung so that it turned 180 degrees. It could then be reloaded and the process reversed to return to firing position.

Imagine doing this in close action! In an engagement, you probably had one shot and that was it. More about the actual firing of this howitzer in the attack on the Confederate C.S.S. Albermarie later.

Was it the 1 pounder?.....I have some photo's of one of those....somewhere.

Dave
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: steamer on November 06, 2019, 01:26:25 AM
Can't find my picture....but this is what I'm on about

https://www.vallejogallery.com/item_mobile.php?id=2658

Dave

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 06, 2019, 01:32:59 AM
Hi Dave,

Oh no. This was a full smooth bore 12 pounder. Much like a carronade requiring training gear with block and tackle.

https://markerhunter.wordpress.com/2010/05/20/dahlgren-boat-howtizers-pt2/
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: steamer on November 06, 2019, 01:35:27 AM
Oh I suspect that was a handfull on a small boat!!!

Dave
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 06, 2019, 01:39:54 AM
Yes Dave,

And we haven't even begun to put in the steam plant, ammunition, powder and shot, loading tools, 14 volunteers, captain, ten coal bunkers and much cordage for the spar torpedo!

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: steamer on November 06, 2019, 01:41:19 AM
Yes Dave,

And we haven't even begun to put in the steam plant, ammunition, powder and shot, loading tools, 14 volunteers, captain, ten coal bunkers and much cordage for the spar torpedo!

John

What was the size of this boat originally?

Dave
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 06, 2019, 01:44:54 AM
Dave the scale is 1:24, (1/2"=1 foot), so I would guess about 45 ft.

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: steamer on November 06, 2019, 01:51:54 AM
Dave the scale is 1:24, (1/2"=1 foot), so I would guess about 45 ft.

John


OK   that makes some sense now....
Title: The Gun Slide
Post by: J.L. on November 06, 2019, 05:01:02 PM
The recoil slide is complete and ready for painting.
Redrilling the hole in the barrel lug was successful.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 06, 2019, 09:02:26 PM
Howitzer aboard and mounted.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on November 06, 2019, 09:59:19 PM
Very nicely done!
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: derekwarner on November 06, 2019, 10:43:11 PM
JL.....so this Howitzer mounting can pivot & swing [train] from side to side via wooden blocks & rope tackle?....... will you show these?

The attachment text says...

'However, Dahlgren’s boat carriage dispensed with breeching ropes' and does not show any rope? .....

The mounting appears as muzzleloading, and indicates a winding screw for elevation, so am not sure what the breeching ropes were used for?

[PS...in an  :old: past life, for years, I  supervised work on our RAN vessels gun mounts & missile launchers, however this term 'breeching ropes' has me a little lost]

Derek
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 07, 2019, 02:05:00 PM
The howitzer and mount came out great John.  :ThumbsUp:

Also...... what really caught my eye is that first picture where you show the bow planking. Looks just like the full sized boat must of looked. These certainly weren't yachts they were building back then.

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 07, 2019, 02:05:25 PM
Hi Derek,

No, there is no reference to any training gear in the model notes. I can see a block and tackle in tight to the carriage to draw the gun slide forward after reloading, but there is no note of any means, other than brute force to rotate this gun. Oh, how they would have appreciated a breech loader!

The gun was used in the action on the night of October 27th. Cushing, in his notes later wrote:

"... a dose of canister at short range served to moderate their zeal and disturb their aim".

This happened after guards on the C.S.S. Albermarie and more on shore opened fire after Cushing's boat was discovered.

John

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 07, 2019, 02:10:55 PM
Thanks Jim.

Yes, this steam launch was very narrow, but long. However, I am puzzled by the length of the spar torpedo spar. In the historical notes, it's length is stated to be 14' long. But the spar I will cut from a dowel is 14" long.  :thinking:

At 1:12 scale, that would be correct, but this ship is build in 1:24 scale. Maybe I'm wrong with the length of the boat as well when I said it was 45' long.

The model is very narrow - 5".

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 07, 2019, 02:17:29 PM
Thanks Jim.

Yes, this steam launch was very narrow, but long. However, I am puzzled by the length of the spar torpedo spar. In the historical notes, it's length is stated to be 14' long. But the spar I will cut from a dowel is 14" long.  :thinking:

At 1:12 scale, that would be correct, but this ship is build in 1:24 scale. Maybe I'm wrong with the length of the boat as well when I said it was 45' long.

The model is very narrow - 5".

John

Here's a link to some info you may have seen already: https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-p/pktbt1.htm


What an interesting story! It also has some boat diagrams with the scale shown that might help.

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 07, 2019, 02:23:20 PM
Thanks Jim.

Pleased to have the link.

There are more incredible stories to tell of this daring raid. I must tell them as we progress.

John
Title: Coal Bunkers and Mast
Post by: J.L. on November 07, 2019, 08:07:57 PM
Hinges have been added to the coal bunkers which would contain bagged coal. Note where the hand holes are. At sea, the lids would remain closed. Awkward for the crew though.

Historical references differ as to how the spar torpedo was rigged. Some references show a line from the spar reeved through a block at the top of the mast. Others do not.

This would make sense to me, as the depth of the torpedo could be controlled better from that height. I will just use a block at the head of the mast to reeve a sail halliard and belay it to a cleat attached to the mast.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: cnr6400 on November 07, 2019, 08:26:47 PM
Looking great John. Gun and its' mounting look the business! Nice save.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Title: Torpedo
Post by: J.L. on November 08, 2019, 02:38:27 PM
Thanks.

The torpedo is made from a 1/2" brass rod.

I find its operation fascinating. A pin holds a steel ball at the top of a tube inside the torpedo. When it is pulled out with a lanyard, the ball drops down the tube and striked a percussion cap. Just like a hammer on a single action civil war revolver striking the cap on the nipple of the cylinder.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on November 08, 2019, 02:43:10 PM
So it was put up against the target vertically? Interesting...

 :popcorn:
Title: Torpedo
Post by: J.L. on November 08, 2019, 02:51:32 PM
Hi Chris,
No, it had to be placed horizontally (on the end of a long pole or spar) angled downward so the ball would roll down the tube. But you are partly right, because there was a flotation chamber in the torpedo, so I guess the torpedo would begin to hang down once released. I just wouldn't want to be the sailor pulling the lanyard.

At first I thought the C.C.S. Albermarie was a ship. It wasn't. It was a steam ram boat. The hull below the waterline was of conventional construction, but above, the sides of the boat were angled severely with a flat top. The walls were armoured with sheet metal.

So the Achilles Heel was below the waterline; thus the idea of using a torpedo to blow a hole in the wooden hull under the water.
Title: Percussion Caps
Post by: J.L. on November 08, 2019, 02:58:20 PM
I mentioned the use of a percussion cap in the torpedo. On the Civil War theme I show a photo of a walnut cased 1851 Navy single action percussion revolver that uses percussion caps.

I acquired this replica non-firing revolver back in the 60's when high end replicas were made in Japan.

Enjoyed making this case.


Title: Re: Torpedo
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 08, 2019, 03:34:54 PM
So the Achilles Heel was below the waterline; thus the idea of using a torpedo to blow a hole in the wooden hull under the water.

John yes which is why most of the larger steam warships of the time had back acting engines, also known as return crank engines. The engine was folded so it could all be below the waterline and better protected from cannon shot.

Here is a link to the only known marine back acting engine at the Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point NY.
https://web.archive.org/web/20081209083114/http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5539.pdf

Dan
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Craig DeShong on November 08, 2019, 03:44:21 PM
Enjoying this build immensely John, not to mention the subtle humor


The gun was used in the action on the night of October 27th. Cushing, in his notes later wrote:

"... a dose of canister at short range served to moderate their zeal and disturb their aim".

.

Yea, I can imagine how a round of canister might “moderate” one’s zeal  :lolb:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on November 09, 2019, 01:58:54 PM
I have missed a few days John, but its really coming together now and all looks great. Quite a handsome model in fact!!!

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 09, 2019, 02:21:48 PM
Pleased to hear you are enjoying the thread Craig.

Hi Bill,
Good to have you looking over my shoulder.

It is amazing that this spar torpedo was set in place by use of only ropes. If one of them snagged or got twisted around the spar as it was being run out, either the lanyard releasing the torpedo or the lanyard pilling out the firing pin would not functcion.

Four different sizes of line are being used here. They did not come with the kit. I chose heavier to handle the spar (brown) and lighter ones (Black) for the release pins. The flag halliard will be a thinner brown line.

P.S. You can see the bronze release pin below the torpedo.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Roger B on November 09, 2019, 02:44:59 PM
I'm still following in the background and enjoying your amazing attention to detail  :praise2:  :praise2:  :wine1:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 09, 2019, 08:58:46 PM
I appreciate that very much Roger.

The boat is ready for the steam plant. The torpedo with its spar is mounted on the starboard side.

I haven't got the boiler in yet and think of the heat so close to the men manning those ropes; firing pin lanyard, release lanyard and spar lanyards. And there may have been men wrestling with the howitzer. Not much room for the stoker with an open fire door scooping coal from a bag on the boiler deck.

Title: Errent Prop Hole
Post by: J.L. on November 09, 2019, 10:36:54 PM
They did it again! :facepalm:

The hole broke through way off center.

Repaired again with JB Weld and bushed the hole with a piece of 3/32"tubing.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: cnr6400 on November 10, 2019, 12:41:40 AM
I think the supplier's drill press operator elf has been into the Navy rum, or got some Elfensteiner stubby beers from Chris Rueby's elves.......  :facepalm2:

I'm sure you said "tut tut" "oh dear" etc when you noticed that.  :cussing:  :Lol:

Nice repair though, looks the business now!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: scc on November 10, 2019, 12:41:44 PM
Nice work John, and a good prop rescue.           Terry
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 10, 2019, 02:03:21 PM
Thanks fellows.

Today the boat 'gets the shaft'.

Driveshaft that is...  ::)

I was looking for a way to mount the propeller so that it would spin when viewed. "Don't touch!" doesn't cut it when there is a propeller sitting down below that fantail just waiting to be spun. Human nature.

Because the driveshaft tube was hollow, it was the size for a 1-72 thread.

The propeller's end will held in place by a brass washer and hex nut. To keep it in place from spinning back to the sten post, a 1/8" bush will slide over the shaft.

Love that telescopic tubing. It saved the day as the propeller bushing as well.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 10, 2019, 02:39:24 PM
John...........I really like your attention to detail ............as well as your insight into human nature!  :)

Jim
Title: The Engine
Post by: J.L. on November 10, 2019, 04:05:33 PM
Thanks Jim.

Gave that propeller a spin myself.

The engine is connected to the driveshaft. It slid into the power takeoff shaft which was also a tube.

The rudder has been permanently put in place now. Yes, the viewer can move the tiller.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Ye-Ole Steam Dude on November 10, 2019, 04:50:20 PM
Hello John,

It's coming together very nicely. It took a hell-of-a-man to serve as a member of that crew.

Have a great day,
Thomas
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 10, 2019, 05:15:16 PM
Hi Thomas,

I agree wholeheartedly Thomas. And to think that all 14 crew members aboard that boat were volunteers.  :o There were actually two picket boats in the raid that night, but the first one, which was intended to provide cover fire and act as a backup, sank on the way to North Carolina. Cushing's crew decided to press on.

The conditions aboard must have been deplorable.

John
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 10, 2019, 06:10:54 PM
Hello John,

It's coming together very nicely. It took a hell-of-a-man to serve as a member of that crew.

Have a great day,
Thomas

That was definitely back in the days of "wooden ships and iron men"!  :)

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 11, 2019, 01:43:16 AM
The boiler is aboard and ready for piping.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: crueby on November 11, 2019, 01:50:46 AM
Coming together great!
 :popcorn:
Title: Approaching the C.S.S. Albermarie
Post by: J.L. on November 11, 2019, 01:59:41 AM
I know this boat has a shallow draft, but the extended keel could have protected both the rudder and prop when the confederate ram was attacked.

Lieutenant Cushing planned to capture the Albermarie rather than destroy her. She was tied up at a wharf, but as he steamed into the harbour, he noticed a barrier of logs had been chained together and placed in the water. He turned, circled around and headed back at top speed hoping to blast over the logs to place his torpedo.

I'll bet the extended keel slid up and over that barrier.
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 11, 2019, 02:01:02 AM
Thanks Chris,
Title: Piping
Post by: J.L. on November 11, 2019, 01:48:21 PM
The boiler is now connected to the slide valve in the steam chest.

If I were under fire, I think I'd be reaching up and using the lower steam valve!
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on November 11, 2019, 02:51:33 PM
Not much left to go now John. Really a fine looking model!!

Bill
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 11, 2019, 02:54:31 PM
I agree with Bill. A really good looking model and a great build thread. Plus...... your additional narrative has  brought this boat to life.  :ThumbsUp:

Jim
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 11, 2019, 09:38:28 PM
Thank you Bill and Jim for your kind comments.

The steam launch is finished. With this, let me finish a most interesting story of courage and valour.

When the crew got past the log boom, they steamed to within 10 feet of the ram. When they pulled the lanyard to the firing pin and put the engine in reverse, the Albermarie fired - sending 100 pounds of grapeshot into their boat. The Confederates then ordered the crew to surrender. Cushing told the men to not surrender and to save themselves. They jumpted into the water. Two men drowned and 11 were captured.

But the tale does not end here. Cushing was quite a fellow. He and one other crew member escaped. They became separated, but Cushing hid out in the swamps and captured a small boat that some Confederate pickets had used to reach their post.  He paddled the boat as hard and fast as he could down the Roanoke to Albermarle Sound, where he finally found the Union Fleet.

Later, in his action report he wrote;

"I have the honor to report that the rebel ironclad Albermarie is at the bottom of the Roanoke River."



I plagiarize this account heavily from notes written by Bob Crane who researched the story, designed the prototype and wrote the construction manual.

It was an enjoyable build.

John

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Admiral_dk on November 11, 2019, 11:38:49 PM
Thank you for a fantastic thread John - build and story  :ThumbsUp:   :cheers:   :praise2:

Best wishes

Per
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: gbritnell on November 12, 2019, 04:03:56 AM
A truly outstanding piece of work! I have enjoyed this build as much as the others. Thanks for taking the time to document and share.
gbritnell
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: cnr6400 on November 12, 2019, 05:07:01 AM
Great model John! I've enjoyed following your build. Thanks for posting.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: J.L. on November 12, 2019, 10:50:14 AM
Thank you gentlemen. Sharing the build has been a large part of the construction of this iconic boat for me as well.

Some parting shots:

Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Craig DeShong on November 12, 2019, 11:47:42 PM
John: an amazing build, your attention to detain is awe-inspiring.  Thanks ever so much for sharing
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Dave Otto on November 13, 2019, 12:30:54 AM
Beautiful Model John!
Very nice work and detail.


Dave
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Art K on November 13, 2019, 02:28:49 AM
John,
Great job, and a beautiful boat. Great story as well.
Art
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: wagnmkr on November 13, 2019, 02:23:31 PM
Excellent result John! I hope to see it in person soon.

Tom
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: Larry on November 14, 2019, 03:29:17 AM
Another great build - your skill is amazing !
Title: Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
Post by: b.lindsey on November 14, 2019, 02:01:32 PM
Love all the finished pictures John!!  Really hate to see it come to an end as I do all of your projects.

Bill