Model Engine Maker

Supporting => My Workshop => Topic started by: Mcgyver on October 24, 2017, 08:26:46 PM

Title: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on October 24, 2017, 08:26:46 PM
Mcgyver shop tour

So hereís the result of 25 years of being a toolaholic.  Iíve two shops, a two car garage and the basement.  The basement started when the eldest son seemed pretty firmly entrenched with a career in Calgary.   On hearing he got a permanent position with a big law firm, I acted.  With strike force shock and awe I moved tools into his vacated basement bedroom before anyone knew what happened.  The key to domestic shop sprawl is this:  remember, itís easier to beg forgiveness than ask permission.

Iíve put a bunch in the furnace room as well, hey, what else are you going to do with it? 

Last year I re-plumbed and wired for the laundry room to move from the basement to the 2nd floor when I redid the kitchen (all by yours truly)Ö.it creates new basement ground to conquer.  There is already a lathe in storage there, and when the better half hasnít been looking, Iíve opened the windows and mig welded (true confessions, I counting on a near zero chance of her reading this)

 Iím almost embarrassed (and pleased) and how much stuff Iíve accumulated.  The truth is I donít have a dollar into it.  Patience and buying and selling has been how Iíve afforded it. 

This is just the basement; the big stuff is all in the garage and to follow


Furnace room, bead blaster, oven, vacuum caster, hardware store drill press (just to save running to the garage), vulcanizer and scroll saw.  No shown is lots of storage and a large Hermes motorized engraver

(https://i.imgur.com/O1iboH1.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/ZKUfk0S.jpg)

Entering the main shop, thereís this alley with three alleyway offshoots to the right

(https://i.imgur.com/9bQH1aA.jpg)

At the end of the lane is a bench and some storage.  On the rack is a Unimat 3 with homemade drive, a Schaublin I havenít decided what to do with, a jewelerís steamer, polisher and misc. stuff.

I like microscopes so thereís a few.  This is a favorite; itís a Nikon Labphot EPI style which means the light comes through the objective vs from the bottom of a biological scope.  Itís designed for looking at opaque items Ė perfect for the shop.  Itís also trinocular so I can put a camera on it.

(https://i.imgur.com/3tpsxXN.jpg)

In the other direction is electronics.  I'm closer to electronics beginner than wiz, but if I'm to mess about with it, its more fun with all the gear.  Iíve got this nice Meiji stereo zoom scope that swings to where keyboard would normally be.  This is the sliver removal station.  Tongue in check, yes, but there is no better way to get at a sliver

(https://i.imgur.com/EUwYIMV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vmBqwOH.jpg)

I also like the old wood tool boxes so have picked up a few up over the years

(https://i.imgur.com/eFyDBiR.jpg)

This is a  nice little Schaublin 70.  I was making 7 BA countersink screws with it last week.  Took some time getting the tooling set, but when it is, what a blast.  Under bench drive is two stage and of my design.  Next to it is a Hardinge bench mill that did the slotting (seen a few photos above)

(https://i.imgur.com/Z2moW91.jpg)

Another side alley Ė a lot of watch stuff.    A good part of the ďlibraryĒ is under bench is full on both sides

(https://i.imgur.com/m3Iy2yU.jpg)

Hereís a ultrasonic cleaner, L&R watch cleaner, magnetic polisher and wild stereo zoom.  Its not as fancy as the other zoom scope, but its right opposite the watch bench so is very handy. 

(https://i.imgur.com/2gFQTQW.jpg)

Hereís one you donít see everyday, at least at home - its a microtome.   Itís for cutting specimens into extremely thin slices for slide preparation.   For $25 including the B&L stereo zoom, I couldnít say no!

(https://i.imgur.com/xGb5M85.jpg)

Hereís the watch bench.  The watchmakers tool collection is very complete, a lot the larger items like staking tools, jeweling tools and presses etc on the shelf over the watch cleaning stuff.

(https://i.imgur.com/qT3uUIL.jpg)

Electronic parts.  These shelves on casters are great, small parts bins are both sides, and they spin around easily for access

(https://i.imgur.com/mcw6XH3.jpg)

On the other side of the cleaners are some nice pieces Ė at Mitutoyo tool makers microscope and a servo drill press.  The microscope has large barrels graduated in tenths and the eyepiece has a graticule making it easy to measure accurately, really handy for watch parts

(https://i.imgur.com/IBRWZE5.jpg)

Next to the Schuablin, Iíve got this project Ė a Holbrook B8 Iím reconditioning.  Bed is scraped, about to start on the headstock and tail stock.  Iíve decided to hard chrome and grind the quill to fit a freshly honed tailstock boreÖ.but there is a slight delay as I have to make stand for the hone before that can done.  It is a truly remarkable lathe, I canít wait to get it running!

(https://i.imgur.com/LxTkagE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/l2Ro5td.jpg)

Hereís a another beast of a scope, a research grade Nikon Apophote trinocular with all the bells and whistles.  It needed a bunch of  work, most of which is done.  I still have to finish the variable power supply for the 10A 10V lampÖ.(no home guy imo should be running mercury vapor lamps, too dangerous and too expensive so I replaced it) but its a thing of beauty (imo)

(https://i.imgur.com/1LemMbp.jpg)

The last little sectionÖ.BCA, Pultra, watchmakers lathes balances and Levin radius lathe (on the floor)

(https://i.imgur.com/lEpp0Jt.jpg)

The BCA is seeing lots of work.   A new DC motor and the spindle has been replaced with this T slot block that a new ER spindle will bolt to  Iíve already milled oil slots in the ways and added zerk fittings. 

(https://i.imgur.com/csiYUpd.jpg)

I use the Pultra a lot, itís an amazing lathe and Iím fortunate enough to have a fairly complete set of accessories.  Next to the Pultra is a multifix motor.  When I want to use a watchmakers lathe, I just park it in front of the multifix.  There's a stereo zoom over top, but I confess it sees little use -

(https://i.imgur.com/dquprOD.jpg)

On the top shelf are two watchmakers lathes, a Rivett and Boley Leinen.  Both have complete sets of collets, bezel checks, slide rests etc, and I also have the Hardinge pivot polisher which is set up on the nearer of them.  Oh, there is a Hermes diamond point engraver as well.

(https://i.imgur.com/KvPgZtK.jpg)

Last but not least is a Rivett 608.  This is from late 19th century, actually stamped #1.   I guess technically itís a Faneuil Watch company lathe (before the name change).  Its as I bought it and subsequent got the B8.  They are so similar in size and function I donít really need it, but its such thing of beauty I havenít  got around to selling it.

(https://i.imgur.com/1upKgN8.jpg)

Thatís the basementÖ.the bigger stuff is in the garage....to be continued when I get to photographing it :)

Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: simplyloco on October 24, 2017, 08:46:45 PM
Amazing! I look forward to seeing some of your output! :cheers:
John
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Kim on October 24, 2017, 08:53:18 PM
Wow!  That's a lot of tools packed in there!  And an amazing number of microscopes for sure!
Nice collection you have. Can't wait to meet the rest of your tools  :popcorn:
Kim
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: crueby on October 24, 2017, 09:14:33 PM
Wow!

I think we should all just meet at your house, brainstorm a project or twelve, and build them!
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on October 24, 2017, 09:29:11 PM
thanks guys.  Output has been more tools tooling and machine tool reconditioning than model engines....I'm cognizant that the hobby has largely been building the shop.  I just get captivated by building the capability and capacity and a lot of these old machines have a great deal of appeal to me.  I've also done a lot of articles for home shop machinist which takes a lot of time.  Here's a link to where I drop photos of stuff I've made  https://imgur.com/a/LNfpI

Wow!

I think we should all just meet at your house, brainstorm a project or twelve, and build them!

lol, thats the problem.  Every day I spend in the shop I create 12 more days of work.

you're not that far and my business is in Welland (awful bloody commute for me).  Do get in touch if you are up this way.

Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: b.lindsey on October 24, 2017, 09:33:49 PM
Not to speed up your demise at all McGyver, but if the saying that he who dies with the most toys wins, I think you are headed for the GRAND PRIZE!!   :lolb:

Bill
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: pgp001 on October 24, 2017, 10:04:43 PM
Hang on a bit.............He hasn't shown us the rest of his stash yet.

I always thought I had an excessive tool collection, (I know this to be true because my wife keeps telling me) now having seen that little selection mine is just normal

I have to say you "have it bad" don't you !!
You have a similar taste in tooling to myself by the looks of it, I also have a fully tooled up Pultra 1770 and agree it is a super lathe to use, mine has all the capstan gear as well as being on the makers Mardrive cabinet stand. I also have a little Boley watch lathe for the smaller jobs. I am guessing you also have an Atlas 7" shaping machine like mine too.
I am now eagerly awaiting for the next installment of photo's, and I am hoping you don't have a Mikron 112 gear hobbing machine, at least I might have one tool that you don't have  ;D

Phil
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on October 24, 2017, 10:29:44 PM

I am hoping you don't have a Mikron 112 gear hobbing machine, at least I might have one tool that you don't have  ;D

Phil

you got me there!  Guess I'll have to add it to the list.  I'd also like an F1 and a small myford cylindrical grinder, but would have to leave TO....I cannot fit another thing in here.   I did have a 7B, photo of it below, just before I sold it.  The two of us would just barely fit in the two car garage so sadly something had to go. 

(https://i.imgur.com/mrXeRWI.jpg)
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: steamer on October 25, 2017, 02:30:47 AM
Saweeeeet!
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Art K on October 25, 2017, 03:53:14 AM
Phil,
I'm sure there must be an AA program for tool-O-haulics. Run to it don't walk. :ROFL: :lolb:
Art
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Jo on October 25, 2017, 08:19:35 AM
 :naughty: Many desirable goodies

Jo
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: jadge on October 25, 2017, 10:35:12 AM
Good grief, that's one hell of a collection.  :o

The only area where I could compete is that I do have a Myford cylindrical grinder.

Andrew
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: steamer on October 25, 2017, 11:36:40 AM
Phil,
I'm sure there must be an AA program for tool-O-haulics. Run to it don't walk. :ROFL: :lolb:
Art

Yes, and when you have an address, feel free to publish it here!....

Dave

Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 17, 2019, 02:55:37 PM
The year in review.

Its that time of year when normal folks reflect on major world events and stories....or maybe send out a note and a pic on what the kids are up to.  Well afflicted, I reflect on major machine and tool acquisitions and horse trades.  This is mostly smaller basement stuff;  I still haven't taken you out for the garage tour. 

There's some really unique items that popped up that I feel fortunate to now be the be custodian of.  I think I'm done buying machines.  I did recently acquire castings for a number of engines (Allchin, Evening Star and Tuetonic class compound) and have major beam, a giant corliss, a seal and jacobs gear hobber aging on the shelf (as well as a Stuart triple to finish) so getting these new castings is I hope a harbinger of a shift from building capabilities to building models.  2020 is the year to finish all the machines and get to model engineering projects....but there's a lot of outstanding machine projects!  Two precision spindles, two lathe recondtionings, a soft bearing dynamic balancer, and so on.

First item is a pivot polisher by Hauser, used for burnishing clock and watch pivots.  So beautifully made and Mr Smithee helped me acquire a nice set of carbide jacots for it.  It'll have a low duty cycle, but anything Hauser catches my attention....no machine is finer made than they are, imo.

(https://i.imgur.com/7e2VrKz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CjF5IRM.jpg?1)

Next up, scored this great little Boley WW83, full set of accessories including the vertical slide/spindle and fairly rare threading attachment with all gears and two slide rests.  It even has a tumbler!.  Bearings seemed dicey and the OEM's were deep groove.  I replaced them with P4 AC's and ground spacers etc - this is a preferred mod many do to these lathes. I replace the motor and countershaft bearings as well.  Other than that, everything was in good shape and works, it just need repainting which took some time.  Its got the 127 gear so is good for inch and metric, one the photos shows chasing a slightly damaged 40 tpi thread

(https://i.imgur.com/0svdTkn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ItiPfDT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/smimKTX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1kxOnDj.jpg)

One of the most interesting machines to follow me hope was  this baby Jones Shipman cylindrical grinder -  a 520 I think.  Apparently it came out of a Mercer plant.  I didn't know such a thing existed, then saw it, and of course then couldn't live without it.  It comes external and internal spindles and work holding is via a 8mm collet.  To give a sense of size, there's a shot of it sitting on my horizontal mill table

(https://i.imgur.com/7yPMSxo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qrdBKAR.jpg)

I also couldn't help myself on this nice little Levin 10mm with about all the accessories.  Overall its beauty, but need a wee bit sprucing up.  Headstock is apart, awaiting P4 bearings, and the drilling tail stock spindle also needed a rebuild.  the motor and wiring were pooched.  I ended up using a 3P motor and VFD (buried in, and using the controls on, the original box).  Its ok, but VFD's are a lousy way to control speed, not as good as the OEM DC.  The best might a Consew servo - it monitors speed and puts more current through so you get great torque at low speed.  I might change it out and use the 3P for the grinder

(https://i.imgur.com/QOBv6Aq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YrvN5LJ.jpg)

I just got through cleaning up the drilling attachment which is an interesting bit.  The graduate wheel at the end turns a screw that hits a stop.  When pecking, you come back into the hole until the stop, then turn the dial how much you to advance before the next peck cycle.  This is super handy with very small drills as you don't waste time and risk breaking the drill (which could be down to a couple of thou) looking for the bottom of the just pecked hole.  The spindle is also adjustable in two plane so you can perfectly centre it.

(https://i.imgur.com/gWUH7t5.jpg)







Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 17, 2019, 03:17:23 PM
To complete the tour, I realized some 2018 additions were missing.....so here's an extension to the home shop machinists Christmas card lol

I added a second Schuablin 70.  This one has the dividing and milling attachment with an Isoma scope - nice!  Ones sort of left as a capstan, and the other for general stuff.

(https://i.imgur.com/0WDwI4V.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eDyWhHI.jpg)

A little Aciera F1 also made it in.  Currently making a new spindle for it.  As nice as these are , the spindle design is, well, imo rather poor - the housing and shaft make up the spindle's needle bearing inner and outer race.  I could not come up with a way of fixing the spindle bearing wear, so am making a new spindle using the lowest profile AC series.  Not very photogenic at the moment, in pieces....and there's' a shot of the new spindle shaft (drilling that one was a challenge!)

(https://i.imgur.com/k0JZZPw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Av9NeiT.jpg)




Also added was the great little Hauser jig borer.  Condition was great, but the paint was falling off (I think I posted this already, but it deserves mention on the 'tour')

(https://i.imgur.com/uvxKHfs.jpg)



Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: steamer on December 17, 2019, 04:16:04 PM
I'm calling in a Seal team to make off with that little Jones and Shipman!..... :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :cartwheel: :cheers:
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 17, 2019, 07:56:27 PM
I'm calling in a Seal team to make off with that little Jones and Shipman!..... :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :cartwheel: :cheers:

lol, different eh?  I had never seen one before.  It comes with quite an elaborate overhead drive that is on a shelf at the moment...pending my ministrations.  I have to admit, not by intent, but workshop building has evolved as the hobby, but I'm going to break free and make more models soon:)
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: propforward on December 17, 2019, 08:05:31 PM
I love everything about this thread. I thoroughly enjoy the toolaholic sentiment, and these are such very fine and beautiful tools, in wonderful condition. Not only that - but the pictures are just filled with atmosphere. Each picture shows the tool in "just the right" surroundings. I can picture myself in the shop enjoying a chat about all things model engineering. Very nice - that is a fine collection - good for you!
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: steamer on December 17, 2019, 08:09:02 PM
I'm calling in a Seal team to make off with that little Jones and Shipman!..... :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :cartwheel: :cheers:

lol, different eh?  I had never seen one before.  It comes with quite an elaborate overhead drive that is on a shelf at the moment...pending my ministrations.  I have to admit, not by intent, but workshop building has evolved as the hobby, but I'm going to break free and make more models soon:)

Let me know how you make out with the F1.   I have one as well, and looking at the drawings ....that spindle doesn't look easy to rebuild...confirmed by your statements....If I was to have to do that I would make a drilling quil head with a new 90 degree mount and make it bigger!.....Probably go ER collets too.     For now I just oil it... ALOT!

Dave
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 17, 2019, 08:37:41 PM
Let me know how you make out with the F1.   I have one as well, and looking at the drawings ....that spindle doesn't look easy to rebuild...confirmed by your statements....If I was to have to do that I would make a drilling quil head with a new 90 degree mount and make it bigger!.....Probably go ER collets too.     For now I just oil it... ALOT!

its a big job and there is no easy way out, at least none that occurred to me.  Everything has to fit in such a small space.  To me, it was important to retain the original functionality - i.e. the 40mm OD for vertical and horizontal use in the machine.  Its darn near impossible to fit a W12 collet spindle with AC's and keep it under 40mm let alone anything bigger.  Spindle shaft and housing were ground and lapped and are within 2 microns using in indicator mic; I figured if making a spindle for an Aciera, I had better achieve their level of accuracy.....no point in all that work if its a downgrade!  The current delay is that I need to finish the soft bearing dynamic balancer (my design, so its working is far from a sure thing!) to get smoother operation out of my ID grinder before doing the housing ID.....then it should come together quickly. 

This spindle and the ER for the BCA will likely be done as articles in HSM.  I thought to offer the spindles for sale that were a plug and play into the original machine.   I'd get the parts made by people equipped to machine to tenths without having to hold your tongue just so, cnc grinding and such.  Then I'd do the assembly and grind of the collet taper.  They'd be expensive but these mills are highly prized as you know,  but without a new spindle option you can be stuck in a dead end alley.  And mine has replaceable AC's!

Thanks Stuart!  Come by for that chat anytime you like
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: propforward on December 17, 2019, 09:02:05 PM

Thanks Stuart!  Come by for that chat anytime you like

That would be great, truthfully. Mostly I like to just listen to people who actually know what they are talking about, and take it all in.  ^-^
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Twizseven on December 18, 2019, 08:19:45 AM
A fantastic collection and plenty for you to work on.  I have the precurser to the F1, aF12 but need to locate the arm to make it into a vertical rather than just the horizontal mill it is at the present.

Colin
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Flyboy Jim on December 18, 2019, 03:55:25 PM
I have to admit, not by intent, but workshop building has evolved as the hobby, but I'm going to break free and make more models soon:)

I can see how that can happen. What a wonderful collection of machinery...................most of which I don't have the slightest idea of what it does.  :shrug:

Jim
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: bent on December 18, 2019, 05:18:10 PM
Wow.  Just...wow.  One thing I've never owned, but have always wanted (all the times I whisht I had one for troubleshooting) is an o-scope.  And you have what looks to be a dozen or so...
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 18, 2019, 09:35:33 PM
There's probably 4 oscilloscopes there.  Two need a bit of work, one of two 465B's are what I mostly use.  why 2?  they seem to come way so darn cheaply I like the idea of having a spare.  For the $100 I'd get for it, having a spare of one of the nicest but aging scopes ever is (for me) worth it.    Its not as hoarding-like is it probably comes across, I sell lots too.  I've built the shop up a lot by buying in bulk and selling most duplicates.

Scopes, new offshore or old quality standbys are fairly inexpensive now, you should get one.  I'm toward the beginner side on electronics but like learning and I can't image trying to learn without a scope to see whats happening.  I'm at the point where I've had a bunch wins fixing stuff, and some of my circuits work, but I've a lot to learn.  Of the things I've undertaken, electronics has been the most difficult to learn on my own.
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Flyboy Jim on December 19, 2019, 02:50:50 AM
There's probably 4 oscilloscopes there.  Two need a bit of work, one of two 465B's are what I mostly use.  why 2?  they seem to come way so darn cheaply I like the idea of having a spare.  For the $100 I'd get for it, having a spare of one of the nicest but aging scopes ever is (for me) worth it.    Its not as hoarding-like is it probably comes across, I sell lots too.  I've built the shop up a lot by buying in bulk and selling most duplicates.

Scopes, new offshore or old quality standbys are fairly inexpensive now, you should get one.  I'm toward the beginner side on electronics but like learning and I can't image trying to learn without a scope to see whats happening.  I'm at the point where I've had a bunch wins fixing stuff, and some of my circuits work, but I've a lot to learn.  Of the things I've undertaken, electronics has been the most difficult to learn on my own.

My first job, after graduating from the Oregon Institute of Technology in 1966, was working for Tektronix in Beaverton, Oregon. My job was to test and calibrate new oscilloscopes. I did that for 6 years and then bought a 37' commercial salmon troller and went fishing in the Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Oregon, Washington , and Northern California. I've always regretted not studying mechanical engineering technology instead of electronics. I turns out I was way more adapted to that.

Jim
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: RonGinger on December 19, 2019, 03:57:25 AM
My first job out of Cass  Technical High School in Detroit, while attending Wayne State University was in an electro-mechanical unit of Holley Carburetor company. I remember one of our technicians telling me when he got to depressed by the junk we were building he would open the side of one of our big 5" Tektronix  scopes and just look at it for a few minutes to see what real quality was. I learned a lot working there and gained a great respect for Tektronix. I still have one of the 'portable' scopes I bought in surplus in one of my cabinets. I cant bring myself to get rid of it, even though I have an imported storage scope that is much more useful.

I also still have my Heathkit OS-3 scope which I got for my 12th birthday. Its on a shelf in the garage, totally useless, but I will never take it to the dump- one of my kids  can do that when they clean up after I'm gone.
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: bent on December 19, 2019, 03:51:40 PM
I've gotten by over the years making do without a scope...but there are times when having something to measure fast transients is very helpful.  I once blew the window glass out of a fume hood in the rocket shop's chem lab, measuring ignition delays with a thermocouple hooked to a scope.  Was not allowed back into the lab for several weeks.  Mercury compounds are very reactive.
:slap:
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Alex on December 20, 2019, 04:05:47 PM
"I did recently acquire castings for a number of engines (Allchin, Evening Star and Tuetonic class compound) and have major beam, a giant corliss, a seal and jacobs gear hobber aging on the shelf (as well as a Stuart triple to finish)"

I saw those on Kijiji; I think you'd do a great job if you put your mind to it. 3-1/2" gauge is not that popular (at least in Eastern Ontario), but at the Montreal Live Steamers it's having a big resurgence.   I build in 3-1/2 because I like building, and the resulting models are not too large.

Hope to see one of these well on the way at the end of 2020. ;-)
Title: Re: True confessions of a toolaholic
Post by: Mcgyver on December 21, 2019, 02:17:47 AM
Thanks for the encouragement Alex.  I don't see myself riding them, just want to build them, steam it up a few times and loo at it occaisonally.... so the lack of a track doesn't really concern me, although maybe when its made I'll feel differently. 

I'm trying to finish a Stuart triple,better get it done before starting another so as part of that have started on Ian Hunt's tube bender.  I made what I thought was a fairly fancy tube bender years ago, but I just can't the radius as tight and well formed as Ian's rig does with its bullet mandrel.  Once again down the rabbit hole of tool making.