Model Engine Maker

Supporting => My Workshop => Topic started by: Hugh Currin on June 26, 2017, 06:18:02 PM

Title: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on June 26, 2017, 06:18:02 PM
Well now, this is gonna be exciting. We've decided to move from Klamath Falls, Oregon to Prescott, Arizona. But for shop work it gets worse. We've decided to sell our Oregon house before buying in Arizona. Probably buy property in AZ, sell our house in OR, then build in AZ. We'll be homeless for at least a year.

No wait, it gets worse for shop work. We'll be living the Snowbird life for that time. Living in our trailer wintering in AZ and summering in the Pacific Northwest (maybe Idaho). Oh man, I'm told if we like the Snowbird life we might even do this for a few years. No shop.

Now I can't imagine having no shop, something must be done. I need a hobby machine shop that I can carry in part of a pickup bed. Doesn't have to be large, just something to play with and build a few engines. Fate would have it that some time ago I purchased a Sherline shop including lathe, mill and lots of tooling. The goal was to convert the lathe to CNC which I have done. But now it looks like a good base for a traveling shop.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Lathe_config.jpg)

I'm an advocate for CNC. Maybe 'cuz I get along with computers, like to watch a CNC do its thing, or that I'm not a very good at machining. Take your pick, but I want this traveling shop to be CNC, particularly the mill.

The Sherline CNC lathe is a good start. I mentioned it in  another thread here on MEM (http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php?topic=6862.0). After some consideration I decided to get a milling column for my lathe from Sherline rather than carry a lathe and a mill. This came set up for CNC,  just had to add a stepper motor and wiring.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Mill_config.jpg)

The column base mounts to the lathe bed just as the spindle does. It's just like the standard milling column and the spindle mounts to the column slide just as it does to the lathe bed. Converting from lathe to mill, or mill to lathe, takes maybe 2 minutes. That is without truing anything, but for many things it's likely OK without. The keys should keep it reasonably straight. Not the whole story. You can't leave the vice on the mill while doing a little lathe work. So you have to re-true the vice, etc.

The lathe set up with the column in the background is shown below.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/overview.jpg)

I'll use my Gecko G540 controller box and a mini-ITX computer for stepper control.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/controler.jpg)

Ignore the O2 tank in the background. Note to self: I must get a smaller keyboard.

I set the system up and have it working. The first thing I found is the lathe cross slide has a travel of a little over 2.5”. OK for lathe but a little skinny for milling. I found that Sherline offers an 8” table for just this reason. That increases the milling envelope from 2.5” to 4.5”. I added one and it's much more reasonable. The throat of the mill is fairly small also. But not to fear, Sherline makes riser blocks to increase this 1” or 2”. My tooling included the 1” block.

I'm thinking of building a box for the lathe/mill. A second box for the controller/computer. A third for tooling. And likely a fourth for materials.

I think the best way to see if this is going to work is to build something with it. So look for a build log with the Traveling Sherline Show, likely a small (small, du) LTD Stirling.

I think I need some tooling to cut off stock. Can't run a 1” bar through the spindle and part it anymore. Thinking of a  portable band saw with horizontal attachment. (http://www.trick-tools.com/EZ-CUT-Jig-for-Portable-Band-Saw-ezcut-jig-9360) It has larger capacity than a compact cut off saw. It also can be set up as a vertical band saw. Anyone have experience? Other ideas?

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on June 26, 2017, 06:31:27 PM
That will do well HUgh!  Does the mill column have its own motor drive or do you simply convert the lathe head to moun to the dovetail of the mill column?

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Dan Rowe on June 26, 2017, 06:55:19 PM
I have been using a portable band saw for cut off work for years. I would consider a good vise to clamp to the tailgate a better choice with the band saw, and the vise will be handy for other uses. Just my 2 cents.

Dan
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on June 26, 2017, 08:09:16 PM
Hugh, sounds like you're all in for the new adventure, so,  :cheers:. I don't know how you are going to be "snowbirding" , but, I know a couple of guys with motor homes that tow a small shop trailer with them. When Dad and I worked construction, we shared a shop trailer. If we were on a job for longer than 4-6 months, one of us would go get the trailer. To be honest, when you're "full-timing", you'll find it comes in handier than one might think.

Eric
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on June 26, 2017, 10:13:44 PM
Bill: Thanks. The mill set-up uses the same spindle as the lathe. I have an encoder on the spindle for lathe threading. I could try rigid tapping if the Sherline had an auto go backwards switch. Now that's scary.

Dan: One vote for the portable band saw. Thanks. What type of vice are you using with yours? Do you have that horizontal set-up or something similar?

Eric: No such luck with a motor home. We have a 19' Escape trailer currently pulled with an XTerra. The plan is to get a medium duty diesel pickup, a strong tonneau bed cover with a small side by side off-road vehicle on top. So the bed will be available for the Traveling Shop and everything else that doesn't fit into the trailer. We thought about two vehicles with a shop trailer but the logistics got too complicated.

Thanks for looking in.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Dan Rowe on June 26, 2017, 11:41:06 PM
Hugh, my bench vise is simply a 4" vise with pipe jaws. I have a box for the saw but it is always on the shelf just below the vise. They are easy to use by hand much quicker than reaching for the hacksaw except for small stuff.

Dan
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on June 26, 2017, 11:50:40 PM
Wow Hugh!  This is a big change!
And certainly sounds like a great adventure :)

Are you going to store your big equipment till you're done full-timing, and can move it into your new big property with an equally big shop?

Kim

Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on June 27, 2017, 04:30:26 PM
Dan: Are you using  a horizontal table  (http://www.trick-tools.com/EZ-CUT-Jig-for-Portable-Band-Saw-ezcut-jig-9360) with the portable band saw or hand holding? Looks less expensive to get a  dedicated portable horizontal band saw. (http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200660083_200660083?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Metal%20Fabrication%20%3E%20Band%20Saws%20%2B%20Accessories&utm_campaign=Klutch&utm_content=49466&gclid=Cj0KEQjwhMjKBRDjxb31j-aesI4BEiQA7ivN-CQCbfJcamCGliWPqUkhZ1s2l2W0uKXlW_Z9ip-iZ3IaAhdQ8P8HAQ) But haven't seen one that does horizontal and vertical.

Kim: The idea is to downsize the house, which is a trick since we're now in 1100 ft2. Probably just put everything on one floor. I expect the shop to go from 20'x20' to maybe 15'x20', but don't know yet. The big equipment would fit but difficult (or expensive) to move it all that far. It is a little large for what I do so I may sell the big stuff, then get a 8"-10" lathe and Tormach mill (size to be determined) when we land. It's up in the air right now.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Dan Rowe on June 27, 2017, 04:47:04 PM
Hugh,
I have the Milwaukee portable band saw but not the deep cut version and I use it by hand. When I added a power service to my shop, I had everything set out and I knew the service pole was too long. I asked the lineman what he had to cut the pole with and said I had a portable band saw. He did not have a better way so he used my saw for the job.

I have thought about one of those rigs to make it work like a chop saw but I went with a larger band saw for that work and the portable saw gets most of the jobs as it is usually quicker.

Dan
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on June 27, 2017, 05:26:25 PM
Hugh, Knaack makes a great selection of "gang box" type tool boxes. You might be able to put a whole sherline shop in one.

http://www.knaack.com/

Cletus
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 09, 2017, 01:24:14 AM
Hugh, Knaack makes a great selection of "gang box" type tool boxes. You might be able to put a whole sherline shop in one.

Cletus
Cletus:

You're likely right, a whole Sherline Shop would fit into one of their cabinets. But then you have the problem of moving their cabinet around. Thanks for the ideas, I'll have to address the portability in due time, and time flies.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: MJM460 on July 09, 2017, 04:06:08 AM
Hi Hugh,

It's a great adventure you are starting on, I hope you will start a thread about your travels.

I am sure a band saw is great to have, but for portability, it is hard to beat a good quality frame and a bunch of new, good quality blades.  Not having a band saw, I cut off bits of 25 mm x 50 mm steel without too much trouble, but admittedly I do not go in for big repetition jobs.  A block of wood clamped on keeps me pretty square so I can finish off on the mill without too much waste.

For travelling, space is always precious, weight best left behind so its hard to beat a frame and blades, and throw in a junior saw frame for good measure.  And have a great trip.

MJM460
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 09, 2017, 04:25:03 AM
MJM:

Thanks. Several above have suggested a manual hacksaw. I'm the lazy type and hate this thought. I'll have to see how much room we end up with and that will probably dictate a lot.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 09, 2017, 04:25:45 AM
OK, I'm getting frustrated here. I decided to make some top jaws for the Sherline 3 jaw before continuing with the Stirling build. Started to set that up and realized I needed several more end mill holders for CNC. Not a problem, I'll just make half a dozen blanks or so. I have a CNC Sherline Lathe which will cut threads. Set up the code and run it half a dozen times, no problem.

Well, I've used the Sherline Lathe little, hardly touched a CNC lathe, and it's all new equipment to me. What could go wrong? I've been trying to get good CNC code and resulting part for 3-4 days. I have had trouble hand coding a CNC lathe and setting up the tools for same. The part needs 4 tools. SO, I think I now have a program that is behaving, the computer is set up reasonably, and I've got an idea of setting tool offsets for the lathe. This has taken several days of nearly trial and error. But all those are in hand, sort of.

But I'm finding the QCTP is slipping. This is devastating for a CNC lathe, it needs to know where its tools are. I looked around the Internet and found a few references to slipping QCTP. The consensus was there may be a convex surface on the "cross slide" or the QCTP itself. I checked this on the Sherline and as close as I can tell both the QCTP and Sherline table are flat.

The QCTP is from Little Machine Shop, 0xA, developed with Tormach. I had the same problem with an A2Z QCTP, thus the Little Machine Shop Version. The T-nut from Little Machine Shop is quite narrow. Some Internet sites suggested this may "dome" the T-slot allowing clamping only near the T-nut and bolt. That would allow easier twisting of the QCTP since it's supported mainly near it's center. One solution suggested was increase the length of the T-nut. That would spread the load to the outside of the QCTP thus resisting torque better. SO, I built a new T-nut system as below.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-1.jpg)

The T-nut on the left is the Sherline compatible version from Little Machine Shop. The right is my longer T-nut system. Also shown below:

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-2.jpg)

The main difference is the longer T-nut to spread the load over the base of the QCTP.

Another suggestion was to place some paper between the QCTP and table. Not run of the mill paper but low clay content paper. I placed some 25% cotton paper (left over from a dissertation, thank god) which seemed OK. This may not be optimum but what I've tried so far.

The last run, with longer T-nut and paper, worked better than prior runs. However, the QCTP twisted about 0.045" at some 2" (1.3deg or so). Not much but 0.030" or 0.040" makes quite a difference in the thread.

The process is, prior to CNC, drill and cut a 3/8" hole 0.055" deep using an end mill. The CNC then bores this out using a boring bar to 0.670" diam. using many passes with 0.005" depth of cut in aluminum (5in/min and about 1200rpm). This is where the QCTP slips. Then groove the bottom of the bore for threading run out. Finally bevel the bore with the threading tool, and thread. Initial threading using 0.0025" depth of cut. The canned cycle reduces the depth of cut as thread depth increases. I think these are conservative cuts in aluminum even for a Sherline, and I'm still getting some "drift" of the QCTP in rotation.

The set up looks like this:

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-3.jpg)

I did, after boring, reset the threading tool to cut the threads. This worked well and the blank fit onto the Sherline spindle well:

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-4.jpg)

The end of the blank showing is a prior trial thread, too small. But the one fit to the Spindle is the right size. So, the CNC threading is working. However, the boring is shifting the QCTP enough to throw everything cockeyed.

Someone suggested applying sticky sandpaper to the bottom of the QCTP. The grit would then work to prevent slippage, similar to the paper. The QCTP body is hardened so drilling for pins isn't a good option. I've thought of building an insert what would mechanically prevent the QCTP from turning. Something like this:

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-Insert.jpg)

Has anyone else experienced this slipping of a QCTP? Any suggestions? Like I said, this is starting to frustrate me. Such a simple thing but causing no end of problems, now and in the future.

Thank you for any help you can offer.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on July 09, 2017, 04:39:31 AM
I had the same thing happen on my a2z qctp on my sherline, wound up making a plate like the insert ypu show in your post. I extended the plate out so it is large enough to run bolts into both t slots to lock it in place.
I set mine up so that the plate screws to the bottom of the qctp in several places, and the center bolt just goes to the plate. The plate has slots around the edge, so I can put 4 bolts into the t slots, and allows me to set the qctp at an angle if needed. No slipping at all.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on July 09, 2017, 03:13:53 PM
Good morning Hugh,

I followed Chris's lead and made a base plate for my A2Z QCTP. Works great.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10010/P1030423.JPG)

As for a portable bandsaw you might think about a Sawzall. I use mine a lot for cutting material.

Good luck on your new adventure. Sounds like fun.

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on July 10, 2017, 12:39:38 AM
It's not cnc, but I use a piece of .020" gasket paper between my a2z qctp and the cross slide and it works well, even with some heavier cuts. Has virtually eliminated slipping issues.

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 16, 2017, 04:31:26 AM
Well, I looked around the Internet some more about slipping QCTP. With crueby and Jim's info I looked for "Sherline QCTP Plate" and found two interesting links. J. E. Rickenbacker posted about his QCTP Modifications. (http://www.borisbrooks.com/shop/qctp.htm) He used a similar plate but what I found useful was the relief around the center of the QCTP. This puts more pressure toward the outside to resist rotation. "Outlaw" similarly used a plate under his QCTP. (http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/0xa-qctp-mount-for-sherline-lathe.28556/) He put in a relief but put the relief in the plate, same reasoning.

The reasoning of relieving the center of the QCTP seemed solid. So I chucked up the QCTP in a 4-jaw on the large lathe. Then relieved some 0.008", using a carbide tool, to a diameter that seemed "right".

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-5.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-6.jpg)

I also found a  post by "John" about using a shim under an A2Z QCTP. (https://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/11320-a2z-quick-change-tool-post-review/) He used it just to get the right height. But he mentioned (7th post) that A2Z suggests a piece of copy paper under the QCTP to prevent slipping.

I took Bill's suggestion and used a piece of gasket material under the QCTP. This and the relief seem to help a great deal. Not sure the problem is gone, but moving in the right direction if not arrived. I may key the QCTP to the table as mentioned above, then there is no question. I suspect with CNC there is less need to turn the tool post, and moving it requires all the tools to be re-set (if running a program), a real PIA.

I got the G-code program working well. Was able to cut a tool holder blank in aluminum. Then tried one from 12L14, free machining steel. Here I had some difficulty. The boring went well, but the threading not so much. Boring I was taking a 0.005" depth of cut at around 1000 rpm (Carbide on 3/4" diameter piece), feed rate 4-5 in/min. Similar on the OD, 0.005" depth using HSS. Threading (HSS) I started at 0.005" depth of cut and the program reduced it some as the depth increased, down to some 0.001" at the end. Threading was done at 200 to 300 rpm. To me these seem to be very conservative cuts.

Threading really bogged down the spindle motor, even stalling it a few times. It was also just not happy taking these cuts. I stalled the Z axis stepper motor at least once, not a good thing. The good news is the steppers seem correctly sized for this spindle. Maybe I can't make an internal thread 3/4-16 in steel using the Sherline? It's certainly pushing the limits. I hate to go to less than 0.002" depth of cut, it already takes forever and the tool spring may allow the tool to just rub.

Now the Sherline has a 60W (.08HP) DC motor, continuous 10 oz. in. at 6100 rpm. DC motor should hold torque at low rpm, but lower power with lower rpm. I'm not used to this, my large lathe is 5HP, an increase of 6200%. I have yet to bog it down and conservatively take 0.05" depth of cut, it'll bust tooling though.

For all you Sherline users, how aggressive are you with cuts? In AL? In steel? Any experience threading under power? Any suggestions gratefully accepted.

Thank you all.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 16, 2017, 04:36:32 AM
As for a portable bandsaw you might think about a Sawzall. I use mine a lot for cutting material.

Jim: Thanks. We have one so the cost would be minimal. I keep thinking of cutting a slice of 12L14 off a round bar for flywheels. I'm not sure I'm up to slicing a piece of 2 1/2" round with a sawzall. Probably doable though.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on July 16, 2017, 05:31:30 AM
Well, I don't have a Sherline, but I do have a Taig lathe (very similar in size and power to the Sherline).  Its been several years since I've used it much but I do remember taking forever to take steel down.  I had to take very small cuts and go slowly.  No more than 10 thousandths per pass, if I remember right.  This was using HSS, not Carbide, but I'm not sure if these little machines have the power, or are rigid enough, to take real advantage Carbide tool.  Just my thinking, though I'm no expert.

Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 21, 2017, 11:47:59 PM
Kim:

Thanks. That matches my experience though I'm down to .005" depth in steel. The Sherline does cut it but takes awhile.

I have a mix of HSS and carbide. On my large machines I don't push too hard, it is a hobby, and can't tell much difference between HSS and carbide. I run into trouble now and again using too high an RPM with HSS. I don't expect the carbide to be an advantage on the Sherline, it was just the boring bar at hand.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 21, 2017, 11:59:10 PM
Been thinking a little on cutting a 3/4"-16 internal thread on the Sherline. When I get into the cut the depth of cut is only a few thousands. However, the width of cut is the thread face. For 16TPI that is 0.063" width. For normal thread cutting, feeding in at about 30deg, that is unavoidable. I found a post (http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/CNC/CNC-Threading/http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/CNC/CNC-Threading/) suggesting an alternative. Here the thread is nibbled away rather than directly feeding in at 30deg. I may try this but it would be a pain to program.

It would also help to put the Sherline in its low speed pulley. I didn't do this and likely should have.

Another alternative is to thread mill them using the cnc mill. This one is feasible.

But for now I decided to use the large lathe and single point the inside. I need to holders to get on to the Stirling build.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 22, 2017, 12:30:03 AM
SO, I decided to thread the inrernal 3/4-16 Sherline spindle thread on my large lathe. This wasn't too bad but took awhile to build several.

I then drilled holes for the tommy bar and set screw using the Sherline mill set-up. I had a little trouble with the Sherline toolmakers vice slipping. I went to a slightly larger steel toolmakers vice which worked better (or I just reefed on the screw harder). After that it went smoothly. I did notice some flex in the Sherline column. Spot drilling to start a drill I could see some flex and moving outward (away from column) of the spot. Then when drilling I saw the drill shift outward a little as it aligned with the spot. I was using a small spot drill (probably 3/16"). It was better when I switched to a tiny center drill (I think it was a #0) but I could still see the flex and offset. Will take some learning to use these Sherlines.

I used the Sherline lathe to finish the outside of the holders. This went well.

But I used the larger lathe to drill and ream the holders. I don't think I could accommodate the 1/4" or 3/16" reamers in the Sherline due to their length, with drill chuck length. The tail stock is off some 0.005" also. I single pointed a mock up Sherline spindle in the large lathe, and aligned the tail stock to within a few tenths. Then drilled and reamed the holes for end mills.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/holder-1.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/holder-2.jpg)

This worked pretty well. I had three Sherline holders, two 3/8" and one 1/4". I made up another 1/4", two 3/16" and two 1/8". While I was set up for threading I made two additional blanks and three aluminum "face plates". Foolish me, I forgot to make up a blank for an ER-20 collet holder.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/holder-3.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/holder-4.jpg)

Finally, I screwed each onto the Sherline spindle and checked run-out. I put an end mill in each holder and measured off its shank. The results were:

1/8" Holders       0.006"   0.005"    TIR
3/16" Holders     0.003"   0.0045"  TIR
1/4" Holder         0.008"   TIR

I also checked the stock Sherline holders:

1/4" Holder         0.006"  TIR
3/8" Holders       0.0025"  0.0025"  TIR

So, not as good as the stock holders but should be workable.

Now I think I can get back to building some soft top jaws for the three jaw, and a tooling plate or two for milling.

Thanks for coming along. Any comments or suggestions please chime in, I'm flying blind here. :-)

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 31, 2017, 01:56:15 AM
OK. With a few tool holders in hand it was time to use them.

Sherline makes a two piece jaw for its chucks. (http://sherline.com/product/chuck-top-jaws/) I've had good luck with soft jaws on my large lathe so wanted to try them on the Sherline. I ordered a set of master jaws and one set of steel top jaws. They make a number of top jaws in steel, aluminum, nylon, brass, etc. The top jaws cost between $54 (steel) and $78 (teflon). They are very proud of their jaws. I thought I could make some give one set of top jaws to measure from.

I cut up some surplus 1/2" aluminum plate using a slitting saw. Squared them up and cut two lengths of about 5". Using a 2" toolmaker's vice tilted at 45deg in the 6" vice I cut 90deg included angle on each length. Each 5" length was cut into 6 pieces and squared to 0.7". All this was done on the knee mill. Could be done on the Sherline but would take a lot longer.

Then on the CNC Sherline mill I cut the bottom to fit the master jaw. This took me some trial and error. I wanted a very good fit so the jaws could be removed/replaces and retain their position. After figuring out the G-code and tooling I cut the base of four sets of aluminum jaws.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/SoftJaw-1.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/SoftJaw-2.jpg)

Finally, drilled holes with counter sink for 4-40 socket headed cap screws.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/SoftJaw-3.jpg)

These are cut on the lathe to be dead square for general use or for a particular job. A spacer is put in the chuck to hold the jaws tight to the scroll for either holding on the exterior of a part or on the interior. Technically the size cut should be the size of the part to be held. That is their purpose. I've found they are "good" for a range of sizes and I use them instead of the stock hardened jaws, at least on my large lathe. They don't mar parts as bad. We'll see if they are as useful at the Sherline size.

Here is a picture of the new aluminum jaws along with the Sherline steel jaws.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/SoftJaw-4.jpg)

The stock jaws in the front and new aluminum jaws in the back.

I have a couple of tooling plates in the works. Those and a tap guide and I think I'm ready to get back to the Stirling.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on July 31, 2017, 05:34:58 AM
Yeah, the Sherline accessories are always a little spendy. That's one of the reasons I went with Taig - the cost of the accessories!  In this case, the softjaw set for the Taig 3-jaw costs $11 or so. I've got several sets.  But they don't offer teflon, nylon, or Brass.

You're getting all kitted out here Hugh!  And great work saving a boatload of money by making your own jaws!

Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: gerritv on July 31, 2017, 11:38:11 AM
Excellent tool making, one of the many joys of the hobby!

Have you seen Luiz Ally's YouTube  (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRaVZ3sssxMKdStuv8Fbrtw)videos? His shop is loaded with Sherline CNC stuff.
He has an excellent couple of videos on making hss cutting tools from round blanks. They cut steel very nicely. I made a version for my AXA tool holders on 10x22 lathe.

Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on July 31, 2017, 04:52:48 PM
Kim: Yes, the Sherline equipment is expensive but very well made. The milling tool holders I made above are some $30 each from Sherline. They are better than I can make, and a good deal for one or two. But for 5-6 it's pushing $200, no longer trivial. But then at $10/hr mine are probably some $500 each. But all that time is learning to use the Sherlines, so well worth it and enjoyable.

gerritv: I've seen a few of his videos. The subtitles are distracting but he makes some very nice tooling. Do you remember which one shows making HSS tools?

Thanks for following along and for the comments.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: gerritv on July 31, 2017, 06:15:37 PM
Certainly:
Micro Tool holders ,Part 1  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpA9FHcC3Vg), Part 2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kXE3AxO4Zg), Part 3 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RixYKIZqJnY)
Making micro cutting tools (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJBBrU9Tx4o) A 4 part series.

end mill holders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yr0p1wTvh8I)

I think he also has a newer tool holder design that fits directly on a 0XA tool post.

Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 01, 2017, 04:50:15 AM
gerritv:

Thanks. He certainly has built some nice tooling for his Sherlines. I really like his low profile vice, I think I need to build one of those. I'll have to find some more time to review more of his videos.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 01, 2017, 05:03:54 AM
Here is the next piece to the puzzle. I made a spring loaded tap guide for the mill. I started with a length of 3/8" 0.028 wall tubing and a spring that seemed right from the local home supply store. I pressed a 0.7" length of brass into one end of the tube and reamed a 1/4" hole though. The plunger was machined from drill rod (silver steel) because it was handy. The parts are below:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/TapGuide-1.jpg)

The cap was supposed to press on to capture the spring. I had to resort to lock-tight though as it was a little loose.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/TapGuide-2.jpg)

It has about 1" of travel. To use it is placed in a tool holder and put on the spindle. A tap wrench is held between the hole to be tapped and the guide. The spring puts slight pressure on the tap but mainly keeps the tap straight to the hole.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/TapGuide-3.jpg)

I built and use a larger (3/4") guide on the knee mill and it works very well. I hope this will work as well.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on August 01, 2017, 05:20:15 AM
That's pretty cool Hugh!  I've just been using a length of brass rod down through a collet in my mill to keep my tap centered. But this is ever so much more elegant!
Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Ye-Ole Steam Dude on August 01, 2017, 10:10:43 AM
Great idea Hugh, so many neat "tricks of the trade" on this Forum. My I suggest threading the Cap and 1 end of the Tube if it needs to be taken apart for any reason.

Thanks for sharing,
THomas
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 01:43:41 AM
Thomas: That would make sense. A while ago I made one 3/4" to fit Tormach tooling and I did thread the cap. I figured the 3/8" 0.028 wall tubing was too thin to thread. I'm sure it could be done but questionable for me to do. Here's a pic of the two together.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/TapGuide-4.jpg)

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 01:51:42 AM
There is progress on Sherline tooling. I mentioned I needed to make some aluminum tooling plates for the mill. So:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/ToolPlates.jpg)

They fit the Sherline T-slots, are about the width of the table, and are 1/2" thick. The concept is to drill holes and tap as needed. Then parts can be clamped to them and machined to and/or below the plate surface a few thousands. When the plates are too cut into to find a flat spot they can be surfaced, fly cut. When they look like swiss cheese and you can't find spots to drill holes, they are replaced.

I need to build some T-nuts that stay below the table surface. Haven't done that yet.

We'll see in the months ahead how well they work.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on August 07, 2017, 03:27:42 AM
Tooling plates are really handy. I have Sherlines 4 x 10, plus the RT tooling plate. Really useful. Wish they were both bigger. I've also made a couple of smaller ones, like you have, as needed.

Now I just need to get back to using them!  :hammerbash:

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 04:40:34 AM
Jim: Sherline makes some nice tooling plates. But I fear if I bought one I'd try to protect it and not use is as it should be, disposable. These are from surplus aluminum so more cut up able in my mind.

But more. Back to an old problem, slipping QCTPs. I decided to make a QCTP riser to match the Sherline spindle and tailstock risers. I built it to have a raised "key" on the bottom to catch the table T-slot. That should keep that portion from rotating. In the top I cut a square recess to keep the QCTP itself from rotating. The pictures below show the parts involved.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-11.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-12.jpg)

The body is clamped to the table via a long T-nut and two socket head cap screws from the top. The QCTP post is threaded into the riser block.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-13.jpg)

The final installation then looks like this:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/normal_QCTP-14.jpg)
(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-15.jpg)

I haven't tried it yet. But it went together so well and I'm pretty sure it will work well. So I also made a short one for use without the Sherline riser block.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-7.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-8.jpg)

The first picture above shows the parts and the second shows the bottom of the plate. The post goes through the plate and is attached to the T-nut via a set screw threaded to both. This is the configuration the QCTP came with from LMS, but with a newly machined post. The second picture shows the bottom of the plate with its key. The top nut pulls the assembly together holding all solidly to the table. But for both the key fit to the T-slot and the square cut out on top is what prevents the QCTP from rotating. Here's a pic of the short tool post mounted.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-9.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/QCTP-10.jpg)

They should work well. But I'll know for sure when I start using them.

Thanks for looking it.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on August 07, 2017, 05:05:21 AM
You're getting quite a collection of tooling there Hugh!  You should be ready to travel soon :)

Where will you be going first?

Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 05:23:44 AM
And even more madness.

Above gerritv suggested looking at Tryally's Sherline pages on UTube. I'd seen these but before I went heavily into the Sherline world so I took another look. In his videos  he used a slim line vice for the Sherline (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itqz-7T-24o). This is a slick vice so I looked around for some plans and found Nino Ransenberg put together a description and some dimensions to build Tryally's vice. (https://ninoransenberg.com/2011/03/27/tryallys-slim-vise/) This is in metric in which I am illiterate, so using some of his dimensions I drew up a set of plans in the more friendly and usable inch system. My vice looks like this:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/vice-3.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/vice-4.jpg)

And the individual parts:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/vice-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/vice-2.jpg)

There are three main parts to the vice. The fixed jaw, L section, bolts down to the table via three socket head cap screws. These thread into one long and one short T-nut (bar). The fixed jaw has a key on the bottom to catch the T-slot so can't twist. It's held to the table solidly by tightening the three screws. The second larger part, the movable jaw, is also held to the table via a key, T-nut (bar) and two screws. It and the L section have a shallow "rabbit" where parts are held. A part is placed on the "rabbit" "shelf" on the fixed jaw and movable jaw. The screws on the movable jaw are made "finger tight". The third part, the clamp, also has a key, is held in place by a bottom key, with two screws to a third T-nut (bar). It is put in the table T-slot, as is the movable jaw, and moved up to the movable jaw. The clamp is them tightened to the table.  The screw, horizontally through the clamp, is then tightened against the movable jaw thus clamping the part. Finally the screws of the movable jaw are tightened. We're ready to machine.

The only change I made from Tryally's design was to relieve the fixed jaw so a long part can overhang and be held. It looked like a very useful piece of tooling. Haven't tried it yet, heck I just finished it. Time will tell.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 05:28:56 AM
Where will you be going first?

Kim

Kim: It's a secret. (And after looking for some time, I can't find a "shhhhhh" emoji  :disappointed:)

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on August 07, 2017, 05:34:09 AM
Where will you be going first?

Kim

Kim: It's a secret. (And after looking for some time, I can't find a "shhhhhh" emoji  :disappointed:)

Hugh

Does that mean you haven't decided yet?  Or she just hasn't told you?  :lolb:

At least you'll be set for tooling when you do go! ;)
Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 07, 2017, 05:45:05 AM
Where will you be going first?

Kim

Kim: It's a secret. (And after looking for some time, I can't find a "shhhhhh" emoji  :disappointed:)

Hugh

Does that mean you haven't decided yet?  Or she just hasn't told you?  :lolb:
YES

At least you'll be set for tooling when you do go! ;)
It is looking better. But there is so much I'd like to make/acquire. I still need a back side cut off tool holder, for with and without riser blocks. I need a holder to tram the mill, though that's pretty quick to fab. Would like a die holder for the mill and just spent $3 for Clickspring's plans, and maybe a fly cutter and a better boring head. As you know it goes on and on.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 09, 2017, 04:32:50 AM
More stuff:

I've heard that a back side cut off tool holder has a real advantage in these small machines. So, I decided to build one for the Sherline. I found  plans for one on this site. (http://www.machinistblog.com/rear-mounted-parting-tool-holder-for-sherline-lathe/) I copied these but for using a T-slot key on the bottom rather than a bar on the side to keep it square. The result is as shown:

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/CutOff-2.jpg)(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/CutOff-3.jpg)

The part on the right, in both pictures, is the main cut-off tool holder. It follows the design of  the stock Sherline holder (http://sherline.com/product/3018-rear-mount-cutoff-tool-and-holder/). A pocket is cut for the cut off tool to set into. The slots allow the screws to tighten and pinch the tool to hold it in place, due to flex of the top. The center stud goes into a T-nut holding the holder to the table.

The part on the left is a riser block when using the head stock riser. It also has a T-slot key on the bottom. Two counter sunk cap screws tighten the block to the table. Then the cut off holder key fits into the slot in the riser. The bolt that normally holds the holder to the table then holds it to the riser block.

The picture below shows the holder mounted to the Sherline table.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/CutOff-4.jpg)

On the left side below the riser block is shown mounted to the table. You can see the counter sinks for the hold down screws. The pic on the right shows the holder mounted with the riser block.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/CutOff-5.jpg)(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/CutOff-6.jpg)

I made a couple of test cuts. The cut off tool worked well with aluminum. However in steel it had some trouble. The problem was more "flex" in the chuck than the holder though. I haven't yet tried different speeds and feeds. But it works as well, and likely better than, the cut off tool in the QCTP on the front side.

All in all a worthwhile day spent in the shop. I used the knee mill to make these. Trying to get all the "larger" tooling I need made before I lose access to the large equipment.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 11, 2017, 12:31:11 AM
Next up was a die holder for the lathe. I looked around the Internet for awhile and finally bought a set of plans from Clickspring for $3. (http://www.clickspringprojects.com/project-plans--swag.html) Although I made a few changes to the plans it was well worth the $3. The main parts are shown below:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/DieHolder-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/DieHolder-2.jpg)

I followed the plans and came up with the version on the left. Hey, it's designed for the Sherline what could be wrong. When I tried it on the lathe it hit the cross slide table. I forgot that I replaced the table with a longer, and thicker, one for milling. So, I put it back into the large lathe and "thinned" it from 1.5" diam to 1.35" diam. The results are shown on the right. Real similar but now it works.

The bar fits the tailstock Morse taper. Then the holder body slides over it. Below is a picture, on the left, of the holder mounted to the lathe. It clears the cross slide table by an iota. The plans call for a handle which is shown on the right. I doubt it'll be needed. If it is I may make a nicer one, this one doesn't feel friendly to ones hand.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/DieHolder-3.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/DieHolder-4.jpg)

Haven't tried it yet but I don't see why it wouldn't work well.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 11, 2017, 12:44:34 AM
Another bit of tooling. I made a tramming tool for the mill. The pics below show the results:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Tramming-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Tramming-2.jpg)

A bracket holds a small dial indicator offset from the spindle axis. Its 3/8" shank is held in a tooling holder. The shank is pressed into the cross bar and the indicator is held via the pinch screw. The second picture shows it in action. It is sized to fit the Sherline table so doesn't have much swing but works quite well. A mirror would help a lot using it!

I just put the milling column in place and found it out some 0.004" over 2". I've found one can twist the spindle a little as its clamping screw is tightened. This will twist the spindle slightly. It didn't take much fiddling to tram it in to within 0.001". The same trick works when mounting the spindle in lathe mode. I need to dial one or the other in and do some machining. With luck it'll hold its adjustment after use.

Thanks for playing.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on August 11, 2017, 01:38:26 AM
Wow, you have been busy Hugh!! No doubt you gave saved a lot of $$$ compared to sherline's prices for the same accessories too.

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 13, 2017, 11:08:40 PM
Wow, you have been busy Hugh!! No doubt you gave saved a lot of $$$ compared to sherline's prices for the same accessories too.

Bill

Bill:

I will lose access to my large machines, at least for some time, soon. I want to get this tooling made before that happens. Much could be built on the Sherline but it would be difficult and some wouldn't be possible. At least possible for me, I suspect others here could.

I think about half of what I'm doing has Sherline equivalent tooling. Even at minimum wage I think I'd be ahead buying tooling. But even for those available it's enjoyable making it, and I'll remember every time I use it.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 13, 2017, 11:37:44 PM
I've seen several places that a large fly cutter works well on Sherline mills. Clickspring shows one. A large disk with stub cutter protruding. (http://www.clickspringprojects.com/large-diameter-flycutter.html) Part of the reasoning is a larger mass to hold a more constant speed. I have a Sherline fly cutter (http://sherline.com/product/3052-fly-cutter/) but it is a real light weight compared to Clickspring's.

Poking around I found an interesting concept. One build put two cutters in a large disk. 180 deg separation between cutters but one further outboard than the other. The outboad cutter was set some 0.005" higher than the inboard. Thus the outboard cutter did a roughing cut and then the following inboard cutter did a finishing. Neat concept. Not too useful for little machines where every cut is a thousandth or two.

I made a large diameter one to fit my Sherline:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/FlyCutter-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/FlyCutter-2.jpg)

It is 4" diameter and about 0.6" thick. The two 3/8" holes are for cutters and the 10-32 screws hold them in place. No plan to use two bits at once but for balance I made it symmetric. OK, OK, the whole truth. On the first C-bore the part slipped and the bore ended up "too far" in board. So I went around 180 degrees and cut one correctly. But if anyone asks I'm going with the balance explanation!

Here's the cutter in action, and the finish obtained on a small test piece.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/FlyCutter-3.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/FlyCutter-4.jpg)

I'm sure the cut and the finish are mostly controlled by the tool bit. I'm not great at off hand grinding tool bits so I'm sure better results than I show can be obtained. I used the new "Tryally" vice and it worked very well.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 13, 2017, 11:51:14 PM
I got a deal on an entire Sherline machine shop some time ago. It came with a Sherline boring head. (http://sherline.com/product/30543049-boring-head/) I've tried to use it but it was quite frustrating for me. Hard to accurately adjust. (This was my experience and may be due to lack of skill. No knock on Sherline.) But again poking around the Internet, the bane of my existence, I found that Criterion makes a 1 1/2" boring head which works well on the Sherline. It is a Criterion S 1 1/2A Boring Head. Again poking around, it's the Internet's fault, I found one on EBay and couldn't resist. It's a beautiful piece of tooling.

I made an adapter which threads onto the Sherline 3/4-16 spindle and takes the 7/8-20 boring head mount.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/BoringHead-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/BoringHead-2.jpg)

It accepts 3/8" boring bars. Finally a picture mounted on the mill.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/normal_BoringHead-3.jpg)

Haven't used it yet but look forward to it.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 14, 2017, 12:16:06 AM
One last thing. Not sure how useful it will be but I have a few ER-20 collets so I made a ER-20 "Chuck" for the Sherline. Pretty simple, a long 3/4"-16 tool holder with an ER-20 taper in the end.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/ER20-1.jpg)(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/ER20-2.jpg)

The threading for the ER-20 nut is loose. The ER-20 nut uses a 25mm-1.5 thread. My lathe thinks this is the same as 16 TPI. 1.5mm is 0.059" where 16TPI is 0.062". This seemed to cause problems. However, I think this is secondary, the ER collet is just pressed into the large taper by the nut, so the thread fit is not important.  It mounts onto the lathe spindle as:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/normal_ER20-3.jpg)

It overhangs quite a ways, more chance for run out. I checked it on the fake stub shaft on the large lathe and it had about 0.003" TIR. Not great but usable. Haven't yet checked it on the Sherline.

I have ordered an ER-32 chuck from Beall Tool which is supposed to be here Monday. Both the ER-20 and ER-32 have larger capacity than the standard Sherline collets. Hopefully they will both be useful.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on August 14, 2017, 01:34:12 AM
That's a nice solid looking boring head, be interested in how it works out. I've been using the stock sherline one, never been happy with how it adjusts, always over/undershoooting the desired setting.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on August 14, 2017, 04:58:10 AM
Looking good Hugh. Lots of nice new tooling.  :ThumbsUp:

I'm looking forward to seeing how all this comes together when the "Currin Traveling Sherline Show" hits the road.

Jim

Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 15, 2017, 12:21:13 AM
cureby: I look forward to using it. It has a real nice feel to it and I expect it will work well. It has a standard mounting so can be used on larger machines also.

Jim: Nearly tooled up. Now I have to figure out how to carry all the pieces. Current thinking is a number of stackable toolboxes. I think one toolbox will end up weighing too much. But figuring all that out is the next task.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on August 15, 2017, 12:28:28 AM
And the last piece of the puzzle. A number of T-nuts.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/T-Nuts.jpg)

Making the vice and other tooling above I made a few lengths of T-nut stock. Today I cut some to 1" length and tapped them 10-32. I like these better than the stock Sherline T-nuts. After this I cleaned up the shop, a very drastic move.

So I think that's all the tooling I envisioned making. Next is to use the tooling and figure out how to pack the pieces for travel.

Thanks for following along.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on August 15, 2017, 12:44:07 AM
I am with you guys as to the Sherline boring head. It works but impossible to set accurately as noted. That Criterion one looks very nice!!

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on August 15, 2017, 12:54:29 AM
I like the t nuts, look more like the a2z ones, the extra length makes them hold up much longer.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 16, 2017, 04:32:29 PM
It's been awhile. We spent September traveling from Oregon to Wisconsin and back to visit family. Way too much driving but overall a good trip.

October I built some boxes for the Traveling Sherline Show. It takes me a long time to think through and build stuff. They are from hemlock with biscuit joinery.  The results will work well, not quality furniture finish but OK. Below is a pic of the two boxes and toolboxes with, duh, tooling in them.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/overall.jpg)

The tape measure is there for scale. The large box is the Sherline lathe/mill. The small box is the controller, computer and driver.

The machine and controller opened up are shown below.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/opened.jpg)

The lathe/mill are below in traveling configuration. Here the head is turned 180 degrees for a more compact package.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/lathe-opened.jpg)

It looks like the below once the head is turned the right way and the milling column moved out of the way.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/lathe-setup.jpg)

Sorry these are a little fuzzy, I really did use a tripod. The controller box below has a mini-ITX computer along with the CNC driver hardware. The main driver is a Gecko G540. The rest of the space contains the power supply and storage for wires, etc. The keyboard and mouse fit inside the box on top of the controller.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/controller.jpg)

The shot below shows the system set-up, wired and ready for use.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/cnc-setup.jpg)

The unfolding doesn't take too much time, maybe 5 minutes. However, getting it all out of the car will take some effort. The computer is running a standard version of Linux-CNC. One configuration for lathe and one for milling.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/linuxcnc.jpg)

I don't know yet if this is workable or not. Looking around the Internet I find very few traveling hobby shops, and none CNC. The two main problems are 1) How much effort is it to get the equipment out and set-up. If it's too much trouble I won't use it much. 2) Will the Sherline equipment work for me. I know many here do amazing things with them, but can I make them work. It should be quite an adventure, I just hope a successful one.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 16, 2017, 04:50:31 PM
Oh ya! A lathe/mill isn't a lot of good without associated tooling. So the Bosch L-Boxes hold all the tooling I could cram into them. Some years ago I purchased a “complete” Sherline shop. Most of the tooling below are from that purchase or shop built as described in prior posts. Here's a quick tour.

The top of the first box is planned to hold materials and projects in process.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box1a.jpg)

Under the materials is the start of the tooling. Lathe QCTP with holders, boring head, collet blocks, draw bar, drill chucks and arbors, low profile vice, lathe die holder, backside cut off tool, ER20 collet holder for lathe, and steady rest.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box1b.jpg)

The next box is closer to a toolbox.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box2a.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box2b.jpg)

Lotsa stuff here, lathe and mill tools, chuck jaws, end mill holders, tie downs, boring bars, loctite, small  telescope gages, test indicator, micrometers, dial indicator, a few reamers, calipers, etc. The toolbox that lives in the trailer contains other standard tools, allen wrenches, crescent wrenches, screw drives, hammer, etc.

The third box contains the larger tooling components. Three and four jaw chucks, tilting base, Sherline riser blocks (1” & 2”), tail stock and riser block, three toolmakers vices, face plates, and tooling plates.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box3.jpg)

The fourth contains cutting fluids, drill bits, taps & dies, a tiny broach set and a set of parallels.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box4a.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/box4b.jpg)

The two drill sets are fractional (inch) up to 3/8” and numbered. Both sets are screw machine length (stub) drills.

The Bosch boxes link together but when combined are too heavy to carry. Should keep them from sliding around too much though.

Finally there is a large box I think I can sneak on top of the SUV without the wife seeing it. I know this is iffy but it could work.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/carbox-a.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/carbox-b.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/carbox-c.jpg)

This car top box has a clamp on vice, sawzall, various small fasteners for engines and a tiny Harbor Freight grinder. Hopefully the grinder is up to grinding small HSS tools. The hand drill is included more for general use than machine shop work.

Don't know till I start using it if I have all the tooling I need, and/or what tooling I'm carrying around that I don't use. In one sense it looks like too much, but then again it could be too light. Only time will tell.

Wow, cool, another grand adventure! Thanks for looking in.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 16, 2017, 05:58:01 PM
I think you're going to need a bigger car, Hugh!  :shrug:

I'm interested to hear how you envision using your shop. I looks like a really nice set-up.

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on November 16, 2017, 06:40:03 PM
So, you pull in to a rest stop on the turnpike, machine a bunch of stuff, and drive off, leaving all the swarf behind? 

Works for me!!
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on November 16, 2017, 07:01:24 PM
Amazingly organized Hugh. I hope it works out as well as you expect. Keep us posted on your travelling shop and what you are making with it.

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 16, 2017, 07:24:38 PM
So, you pull in to a rest stop on the turnpike, machine a bunch of stuff, and drive off, leaving all the swarf behind? 

Works for me!!

I was thinking in terms of a motel room!  :mischief:

Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on November 16, 2017, 07:27:12 PM
So, you pull in to a rest stop on the turnpike, machine a bunch of stuff, and drive off, leaving all the swarf behind? 

Works for me!!

I was thinking in terms of a motel room!  :mischief:

 :lolb:
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 16, 2017, 08:08:15 PM
I think you're going to need a bigger car, Hugh!  :shrug:

I'm interested to hear how you envision using your shop. I looks like a really nice set-up.

Jim

Jim: A bigger tow vehicle could be in the cards. Since we'll be living in the trailer a larger one would be good. Likely a diesel pickup, mileage, more power, and a storage shed behind the cab. We'll see though once we try the current set up (XTerra).

The thinking for the shop! We'll likely set up outside Quartzsite for the winter season, this year for sure and likely for years to come. Maybe a different spot but still set-up for the winter. Ideally buy a canvas tent for a shop though some parks don't allow such. With or without a tent set up on a picnic table and go to work. If no tent likely put down a cheap tarp to catch chips. Depending on how it works out, maybe leave the shop in a storage unit during the summer? That's to be determined. The projects will likely be model engines (small) and similar. I'm trying to get back to the LTD Stirling I've mentioned.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 16, 2017, 08:11:47 PM
So, you pull in to a rest stop on the turnpike, machine a bunch of stuff, and drive off, leaving all the swarf behind? 

Works for me!!

I was thinking in terms of a motel room!  :mischief:

A rest area would work well, if I can steal electricity. Motels are expensive but sure would solve the swarf problem. Likely couldn't come back to the same one though. :-)

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 16, 2017, 08:17:50 PM
Amazingly organized Hugh. I hope it works out as well as you expect. Keep us posted on your travelling shop and what you are making with it.

Bill

Bill: Thanks. Riding around for long periods I think would beat up the tools if not packed well. We'll see if the organization holds up. Most shops look neat and organized until they are used. Then, not so much.

I'm trying to get back to the LTD Stirling I've mentioned. It's the first project on the list. It planned this for last summer using the Sherlines, but was pushed aside getting the Traveling Show organized. I plan to do a build log on it.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on November 16, 2017, 09:50:34 PM
So, you pull in to a rest stop on the turnpike, machine a bunch of stuff, and drive off, leaving all the swarf behind? 

Works for me!!

I was thinking in terms of a motel room!  :mischief:

A rest area would work well, if I can steal electricity. Motels are expensive but sure would solve the swarf problem. Likely couldn't come back to the same one though. :-)

Thanks.

Hugh
No generator?

Or these days the solar cells are much more efficient, could charge a big car battery with an inverter to get AC voltage back...

Or, make a steam powered AC generator!

Whatever, all sounds like an interesting way to go!   :cheers:
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Dave Otto on November 16, 2017, 11:50:30 PM
Lots of nice work there Hugh, I would have trouble thinking that far ahead.

Dave
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 17, 2017, 03:20:12 AM
Hugh,

Back in post #48 you mentioned ordering an ER-32 chuck from Beall Tool. Did you get it and if so how do you like it? I've got an ER-16 holder and collets for my Sherlines and use the heck out of it. An ER-32 would be nice to have.

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 17, 2017, 03:44:28 AM
Hugh,

Back in post #48 you mentioned ordering an ER-32 chuck from Beall Tool. Did you get it and if so how do you like it? I've got an ER-16 holder and collets for my Sherlines and use the heck out of it. An ER-32 would be nice to have.

Jim

Jim: I did order the Beall ER-32 chuck for my Sherline. I haven't used it yet. Haven't done a lot with the Sherline other than get it ready to go. So not a fair review, but it does seem big with considerable overhang. It could prove very useful though, pretty large capacity. I'll probably find the room to take it along and try it. Hopefully I can give you a better idea later. I did make an ER-20 chuck. It's found a place in my kit and I do like it. The ER-20 is the size used on the Tormach milling tool holders so I have a few collets but far from a full range.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: paul gough on November 17, 2017, 05:37:13 AM
Jim, in reply 67 you mention you have an ER16 holder an collets for your Sherline Lathe. Could you inform me the brand and supplier please. This would be a very useful item for me. Ditto to anybody else who knows of ER 11 or 16, please let me know which and where from. Regards, Paul Gough.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 17, 2017, 02:35:16 PM
Jim, in reply 67 you mention you have an ER16 holder an collets for your Sherline Lathe. Could you inform me the brand and supplier please. This would be a very useful item for me. Ditto to anybody else who knows of ER 11 or 16, please let me know which and where from. Regards, Paul Gough.

Hi Paul,

Here's a link to the ER-16 collet holder I have: http://www.taigtools.com/c1045ER.html It's made to fit a Taig spindle and has about a 1/8" shoulder that keeps it from screwing on to the Sherline spindle more than a couple of turns. Once that shoulder was turned off, it screws on completely. I use it often.

I also bought 2 collet wrenches, which I think were these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/ER16A-Wrench-For-Clamping-Nut-CNC-Milling-Lathe-Precision-Spanner-New-Parts/263249129845?epid=685805349&hash=item3d4adef175:g:bQoAAOSwOrxZ12I3

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: paul gough on November 17, 2017, 05:37:58 PM
Jim, thank you very much for the info, I'll check it out. Regards, Paul Gough.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: MJM460 on November 19, 2017, 10:18:08 AM
Hi Paul, Ausee Machines and Tools here in Melbourne have those collets and holders.  They advertise in AME, and you can find the whole catalogue on line.  It takes about 45 minutes, but I ring and then go there.  They seem to provide reasonable service and will do mail order, and do for most of their business as far as I can see.  I suggest look them up on line and then give them a call.

MJM460
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: paul gough on November 20, 2017, 01:05:13 PM
Thanks MJM, I was not aware Ausee would have any holders that would screw onto a Sherline spindle, I'll check them out. Regards, Paul Gough.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 28, 2017, 10:48:12 PM
One more note on the Traveling Show. Here's a pic of the Show loaded into Terra for a trial trip.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Loaded.jpg)

Yeti doesn't have anything to do with the Traveling Show, unless you need an ice tea while machining. :-)

Now, with luck, I can get back to the LTD Stirling build. It was planned for last summer but now looks like a winter project.

Thanks for coming along.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Dave Otto on November 28, 2017, 11:46:25 PM
Looks good Hugh!
Please keep us posted.

Dave
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on November 29, 2017, 02:15:15 AM
You've sure packed a lot in there, Hugh!

So, does your raw materials go along the sides next to the tooling stack? You could fit a lot of bar stock in there!  Make sure you don't overload your rear axles!  ;)

Can't wait to hear how your travelling Sherline show works out.  Maybe you can sell tickets to the show when you pull into a new camp site!  :Lol:

Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: paul gough on November 29, 2017, 03:10:25 AM
Hi Hugh, Have you seen this? If not, an idea for the picnic table when your camping, novel fuel too. A little bigger boiler and engine and and potentially a viable power source for a steam enthusiast. Regards, Paul Gough.

<z0tAUNaHomct=273s>
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 29, 2017, 03:22:23 AM
Hi Hugh, Have you seen this? If not, an idea for the picnic table when your camping, novel fuel too. A little bigger boiler and engine and and potentially a viable power source for a steam enthusiast. Regards, Paul Gough.


Now that is way cool!  :ThumbsUp:

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on November 29, 2017, 11:51:33 AM
Hand sanitizer as a fuel...now there is a novel idea! 

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on November 29, 2017, 01:38:37 PM
Hand sanitizer as a fuel...now there is a novel idea! 

Bill
Would that explain the old conspiracy theory about spontaneous combustion?   :ROFL:
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 29, 2017, 04:01:11 PM
You've sure packed a lot in there, Hugh!

So, does your raw materials go along the sides next to the tooling stack? You could fit a lot of bar stock in there!  Make sure you don't overload your rear axles!  ;)

Can't wait to hear how your travelling Sherline show works out.  Maybe you can sell tickets to the show when you pull into a new camp site!  :Lol:

Kim

Kim: It is amazing, after looking around the shop and considering which tools are "essential", how many tools you end up with. Yes a lot of tooling and those boxes are heavy.

Remember, tiny engines. The stock for the LTD Stirling is in one of the Bosch boxes. Don't know what I'll do if I eventually need to order new stock. "Hello. I'd like to order a 1/2" piece of 3" bar, please".

Probably no tickets but I expect interest and maybe even a few beers.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on November 29, 2017, 04:12:16 PM
Hi Hugh, Have you seen this? If not, an idea for the picnic table when your camping, novel fuel too. A little bigger boiler and engine and and potentially a viable power source for a steam enthusiast. Regards, Paul Gough.

Paul: I hadn't seen that, very interesting. Another idea for those builders trying to find something for our engines to do. But you need the steam engine to make the lathe work to build the steam engine to make the lathe work to build the engine to.... Chicken and the egg. :-)

I must confess stray thoughts about hooking a small IC engine to my lathe/mill. That for when the world stops and we need to trade work on farm equipment for food. Followed immediately by, your crazy. But by then the thought has occurred. (But then his whole project is evidence that yes, I am crazy.)

Thanks for the note and video. Cool.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on December 18, 2017, 03:46:25 AM
A note from Brenda AZ. We're here for awhile and I'm going to try the Traveling Show. Set up at a picnic table looks like this:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Brenda-2.jpg)

and with the crazy fool who thought it could work:

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/Brenda-3.jpg)

I've found that chips (schwarf) is more of a problem that I'd anticipated. The Sherline Lathe can spew chips way beyond the meager tarp under the table. I've decided to get a "sun canopy" with either solid or mesh side walls. With a large tarp going beyond the "tent" walls it should contain the chips fairly well. I'm now searching for one and will wait on it before doing more work.

A canopy will also help with set-up. It takes some 45 minutes to set-up and 1+ hours to put away. So any machining takes a day. A canopy will allow the set-up to remain allowing an hour or two of work at a time.

It is nice to be outside machining where it's 70 degrees, in December though.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: crueby on December 18, 2017, 04:03:44 AM
Great setup! I like the idea of combining the outdoors with working on a project. For the swarf spray, one thing I have done is take some sheets of plexiglass and used some slotted blocks of wood to stand them up on the sides and behind the Sherline, stops a lot. Combined with a shield clipped or taped on the cross slide, stops even more.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Flyboy Jim on December 18, 2017, 04:24:05 AM
Looks like a great start on your endeavor Hugh. Swarf is definitely an issue, but I think Chris has some good ideas. I have a backboard behind my lathe and mill which helps a lot.

Enjoy the sun and warmth down there. It's 28 degrees in K Falls right now.

Jim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on December 18, 2017, 06:06:24 AM
Very cool setup there Hugh!  Though I can see it being a bit of a pain to have to setup and take down every time you want to use it, so the walled canopy seems like a great idea.

So, did you make anything? Or just set it up and test it out? :)
Kim

[Edit]
PS Ignore my question, I just saw your other post!  :embarassed:)
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: b.lindsey on December 18, 2017, 12:19:43 PM
Very nice and compact Hugh, but that is what you were after of course.  I can only imagine the looks/questions you get or will get as people walk by and see that set-up  :o  I know I would sure be interested in what was going on :)

Bill
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Admiral_dk on December 18, 2017, 08:48:30 PM
You could always claim to be making spare parts for the car / van when asked what you do  ^-^

Quote
Enjoy the sun and warmth down there. It's 28 degrees in K Falls right now.

Oh man that gave me a few thoughts - like 28 degrees K (Kelvin) [-409 F / -245 C] (that) Falls (now) => Outer Space or NASA's test lab where the big James Webb Space Telescope runs last test before launch 2018 .... Brrr .... 28 degrees Fahrenheit - now that's a lot better, almost what we have here - 2 C .... 28 degrees Celsius - now that is warm enough.
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on December 20, 2017, 03:17:10 AM
crueby: Good idea with the guards. I'll likely try some of cardboard next time I set up. After trying to pick chips out of the gravel I think it needs more, but this should help.

Kim: I ordered a "sun canopy" with side walls. That, with a cheep 12'x12' tarp underneath should go a long way to control chips and allow longer term set ups. Should be back in business soon after Christmas.

Bill: After two days working I've only had one neighbor ask about it. I mentioned model engines and didn't get a look of comprehension back. Probably should say car parts, but then I'd could have customers lined up and no time to do my projects.

Admiral_dk: I see the confusion with that "K" sitting there. But Jim and I both know what we meant. I'll try to put and "F" where needed realizing it's an international forum. Are they testing the telescope at those temperatures? Does the chamber also pull a high vacuum? That would be a hard test setup in the size needed. I'd like to see that.

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Hugh Currin on January 13, 2018, 02:32:14 AM
I've obtained, via the big brown truck, a 10' x 10' sun canopy with side walls. Set this up in the "backyard" with a large tarp under.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10011/tent.jpg)

It works well. I can leave it set up with the equipment inside, where we are seems safe. But with the tent it's not something that can be set up for a day or two, just when "landed" for a couple of weeks. Far better than not having a shop at all.

But you might note the clear blue sky and palm trees. The temperatures here, in Brenda AZ (I'll wait till you pull up Google Maps.....), are between just right (lows mid 40sF to highs in the low 70sF) to a little cool (lows in the high 30sF to highs in the mid 60sF). Just thought I'd make most of you feel bad. So working in a tent is comfortable for 3 to 6 hours a day, not much mass to temper inside temps.

Life is Good.

Hugh
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Kim on January 13, 2018, 06:15:28 AM
Looks beautiful there Hugh.  Like the shop tent too!
Enjoy the warm, dry weather.  Its chilly and damp up here in the northwest!
Kim
Title: Re: Currin's Travelling Sherline Show
Post by: Admiral_dk on January 13, 2018, 08:34:19 PM
Quote
Are they testing the telescope at those temperatures? Does the chamber also pull a high vacuum? That would be a hard test setup in the size needed. I'd like to see that.

I would like to see it too, but I expect that it's only the "insiders" that have a look before sealing the "chamber" and on camera.
I've only seen some Youtube videos about the telescope where they mention that NASA has refurbished the worlds biggest vacuum / temperature test chamber (their own) just so they could use it on this project.
It's supposedly the only place here on the planet where you can test big objects to those extremes - and as far as I remember it was build to test the Apollo programs vehicles - Lunar Lander and Command Module.