Model Engine Maker

Supporting => My Workshop => Topic started by: Robert Hornby on July 28, 2014, 12:18:57 PM

Title: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on July 28, 2014, 12:18:57 PM
We have pretty much sold our house (price agreed on, just awaiting for the buyer to sell their house) and have pretty much bought a new (to us at least) house with a small store room behind the garage. I intend to enlarge it to about double its present size to give me 12 square meters floor area. I will need to position the new window (non at the moment) and thought I would get some input from "experts" out there about that and my proposed layout.
As a consequence of relocating, my steam launch project will languish for a while.
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/NewWorkshop001_zpsb1f273be.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/NewWorkshop001_zpsb1f273be.jpg.html)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: b.lindsey on July 28, 2014, 01:24:59 PM
Hi Robert,
Where you are showing the high shelving over by the mill/drill, if it is high enough you may want to consider putting a smaller workbench underneath it, if only to store various items you will use with the mill...like rotart table, clamps, collets, drill chuck, etc.  Just a thought.

Bill
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Jo on July 28, 2014, 01:32:03 PM
A few observations:

1, Milling Machines: It is normal practise is to mount these in the corner at an angle to minimise the amount of wall space lost and to make maximum use of the corner.

2, Where do you intend on putting your bench vise? Natural light is wanted for an assembly bench but not necessary for a "grunt" bench.

3, Where are your power outlets?

4, Where were you thinking of keeping your work in progress? Temporary benches using a pair of the dirt cheap DIY workmates with a piece of timber on the top could be put up when needed and then put away when not.

5, You seem to have spread out to use all the available space rather than planned to make maximum use of a smaller area, leaving space for future expansion or temporary benches.

Jo
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Jasonb on July 28, 2014, 01:41:25 PM
If you have the space put the mill on a flat wall not in the corner as it will allow you to work on longer items if needed so maybe swap the drill and mill over, its easier to move the drill iff needed for a one off or just drill with the mill. Only put them in a corner if you are tight on space

Defiinately need more bench space, one as a working bench with your vice and another to sit at for marking out, assemble and fine work. Hanging for saws & files behind working bench, shallow shelves and small parts storage near other bench.

Plenty of draws and storage under the benches, I don't like a lot out on shelves as it collects cast iron dust and is black whenever you go to use it.

J
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on July 28, 2014, 01:52:52 PM
I agree with both Jo and Bill. If you move the mill to the right and in the corner you could move the lathe around to that wall. That would free up that space for a bench with a vise and even another machine. As Jo stated, a grunt bench is going to have things going on that don't agree with glass, i.e. Sparks from a disc grinder, flying miss struck punches or chisels, or parts thrown in a moment if disgust (ask me how I know). I think these moves would allow you to add in some small benches to hold tooling as Bill suggested. That's my $.02US anyhoo.

Whiskey

Just saw Jason's post. If you're  just modeling I think the corner is fine, but, then again if there's any doubt about future projects, now is the time to think it over.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Ramon on July 28, 2014, 02:02:03 PM
Hi Robert - I agree with Jason here maximum access each side of the mill but if you swap the mill with the drill positions move that grinder as far away as possible - the 'fall out' from grinding will soon permeate your slideways  :ShakeHead:.

Bench wise - personally I favour an 'island' bench or at least one that you can access from both sides - mine (6ft x 2ft 6") runs out into the centre of the workshop from the bench the lathe sits on. Being able to switch sides of a project - especially a boat  ;) - is an absolute boon especially if something's too long or too heavy. You can't have 'too much' bench space  ;)

Take your time and get it right though it will never be finite - I'm still finding ways of 'improving' things after some thirty years in this one - mainly to create 'more space'  ;)


Regards - Ramon

PS did you pick up your PM on the pump details?
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Mosey on July 28, 2014, 02:43:05 PM
I too think that the mill parallel with the wall is preferred because you can use the space on either side of the machine for storage cabinets for mill tooling etc., and the tops as staging space for your project, measuring tools, drills, center drills, parallels, indicators, clamps, wedges, drill chucks, collets, plans, etc. If the mill goes in the corner at an angle, the space behind it can become a catch all for swarf, junk, and just is wasted.
Mosey
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: mklotz on July 28, 2014, 04:17:05 PM
Some thoughts from my own shop design (mis)adventures...

Rolling tool cabinets provide the most design flexibility.  (Try as you may, you will never perfect the shop design on the first try.)  Building fixed storage and drawers is tedious and uses up play time ( (unless you like playing with brown stuff).  The smaller rolling cabinets can be rolled under benches to provide instant drawers.

Shop windows are wonderful but I wouldn't want one over my workbench.  Use that space for tools.  Windows allow thieves to inspect the goods before breaking in.  Provide for some form of curtains or shutters.  Also, there are rare times (e.g. heat treating) when you want the shop dark.

I agree with Ramon on an island workbench (wish I had space for one).  In my dream design there would be a 'slot' running down the middle of the bench beneath which was a box.  Tools could be stored in this slot-box while in use on the bench.  A 'slot cover' would close the slot when the full width of the bench was needed.  (It's a variant of a classic European woodworking bench design.)

Stand-while-working beefy workbenches are great but one needs must have a desk-height bench at which one can sit to do fine work, layout, etc..

Spend a lot of time deciding what the correct workbench height is for YOU.  We're not getting younger and, ultimately, your body will thank you.  Allow for the fact that you may, at some point, want to sit on a stool while working.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Arbalest on July 28, 2014, 07:12:21 PM
I've pretty much decided on this for my workshop if it helps. The shop should arrive some time September.

http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php?topic=3023.msg52811#msg52811
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on July 29, 2014, 06:26:43 AM
Wow lots of experts out there, thanks very much. My present workshop is quite large and spacious being 6 meters x 6 meters in a shed. (We are on a small acreage) The house we are buying has a brick store room 2.45 meters x 2.17 meters. The largest I can make it will be as per the drawing, this gives me 12 meters square, the minimum I think I can live with, a bit more would be good but it is not to be.
So to answer all you suggestions/comments I first thank Thor for enlightening me on the procedure to incorporate the topics.
Hi Robert,
Where you are showing the high shelving over by the mill/drill, if it is high enough you may want to consider putting a smaller workbench underneath it, if only to store various items you will use with the mill...like rotart table, clamps, collets, drill chuck, etc.  Just a thought.

Bill
yes Bill I will be adding a mill height table at the mill for tools and stuff
A few observations:

1, Milling Machines: It is normal practise is to mount these in the corner at an angle to minimise the amount of wall space lost and to make maximum use of the corner.

2, Where do you intend on putting your bench vise? Natural light is wanted for an assembly bench but not necessary for a "grunt" bench.

3, Where are your power outlets?

4, Where were you thinking of keeping your work in progress? Temporary benches using a pair of the dirt cheap DIY workmates with a piece of timber on the top could be put up when needed and then put away when not.

5, You seem to have spread out to use all the available space rather than planned to make maximum use of a smaller area, leaving space for future expansion or temporary benches.

Jo

Jo I hadn't thought about placing the mill at 45 deg. in a corner but will consider this. The bench vise is at the left, but this can be moved if required. There is no power in the store room at present but there will be put in an all 4 walls including good lighting. Regarding temporary and future benches/work in progress, I mostly stay with the one model until finished so there shouldn't be too much in the way of large bits of work in progress. Also just outside the entry of the shop in the garage is about 2 meters of spare space between the Cobra and the wall for more shelving and folding benches.
Jason
If you have the space put the mill on a flat wall not in the corner as it will allow you to work on longer items if needed so maybe swap the drill and mill over, its easier to move the drill if needed for a one off or just drill with the mill. Only put them in a corner if you are tight on space

Definitely need more bench space, one as a working bench with your vice and another to sit at for marking out, assemble and fine work. Hanging for saws & files behind working bench, shallow shelves and small parts storage near other bench.

Plenty of draws and storage under the benches, I don't like a lot out on shelves as it collects cast iron dust and is black whenever you go to use it.

J
I am thinking the mill might be better placed where I have shown the grinder/sharpener to give me more end space as you suggested. The one bench I have seems to suit my needs on its own without a second one save for a folding one occasionally. Under my bench resides the air compressor and stick welder.
I agree with both Jo and Bill. If you move the mill to the right and in the corner you could move the lathe around to that wall. That would free up that space for a bench with a vise and even another machine. As Jo stated, a grunt bench is going to have things going on that don't agree with glass, i.e. Sparks from a disc grinder, flying miss struck punches or chisels, or parts thrown in a moment if disgust (ask me how I know). I think these moves would allow you to add in some small benches to hold tooling as Bill suggested. That's my $.02US anyhoo.

Whiskey, the bench doubles as a 'grunt' bench and all other things, hand work assembly and such. The bench frame is 75mm square RHS 6mm thick walls. The top is 50mm (yes 50mm) thick timber (ex Roland 4 colour printing machine crate base) covered with lino. it works just well.
Ramon,
Hi Robert - I agree with Jason here maximum access each side of the mill but if you swap the mill with the drill positions move that grinder as far away as possible - the 'fall out' from grinding will soon permeate your slideways  :ShakeHead:.

Bench wise - personally I favour an 'island' bench or at least one that you can access from both sides - mine (6ft x 2ft 6") runs out into the centre of the workshop from the bench the lathe sits on. Being able to switch sides of a project - especially a boat  ;) - is an absolute boon especially if something's too long or too heavy. You can't have 'too much' bench space  ;)

Take your time and get it right though it will never be finite - I'm still finding ways of 'improving' things after some thirty years in this one - mainly to create 'more space'  ;)

Ramon, I take your point of an island bench and did try this arrangement in the shed a few years ago but reverted back to under a window for the natural light benefit and with a back to it things can be pushed there without falling off the edge. The bench was originally about 200mm longer and 300mm wider but i reduced it when I suspected I just would not have the room for such a large bench.
Mosley,
I too think that the mill parallel with the wall is preferred because you can use the space on either side of the machine for storage cabinets for mill tooling etc., and the tops as staging space for your project, measuring tools, drills, center drills, parallels, indicators, clamps, wedges, drill chucks, collets, plans, etc. If the mill goes in the corner at an angle, the space behind it can become a catch all for swarf, junk, and just is wasted.
Mosey
I am swinging towards having the mill square to a wall, just not sure which wall yet.
Mklotz
Some thoughts from my own shop design (mis)adventures...

Rolling tool cabinets provide the most design flexibility.  (Try as you may, you will never perfect the shop design on the first try.)  Building fixed storage and drawers is tedious and uses up play time ( (unless you like playing with brown stuff).  The smaller rolling cabinets can be rolled under benches to provide instant drawers.

Shop windows are wonderful but I wouldn't want one over my workbench.  Use that space for tools.  Windows allow thieves to inspect the goods before breaking in.  Provide for some form of curtains or shutters.  Also, there are rare times (e.g. heat treating) when you want the shop dark.

I agree with Ramon on an island workbench (wish I had space for one).  In my dream design there would be a 'slot' running down the middle of the bench beneath which was a box.  Tools could be stored in this slot-box while in use on the bench.  A 'slot cover' would close the slot when the full width of the bench was needed.  (It's a variant of a classic European woodworking bench design.)

Stand-while-working beefy workbenches are great but one needs must have a desk-height bench at which one can sit to do fine work, layout, etc..

Spend a lot of time deciding what the correct workbench height is for YOU.  We're not getting younger and, ultimately, your body will thank you.  Allow for the fact that you may, at some point, want to sit on a stool while working.
Security is not a problem for me as the house is in a walled /gated community and security is high and I do like the natural light over the bench

so thank you all again gentlemen and lady I do appreciate you feed back.
Robert
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Arbalest on July 29, 2014, 10:18:55 AM
I thought about putting my mill in a corner but it would prevent me from working on the end of long material so it's going to go on the long side of my workshop. I also like natural light and planned to have two windows on the long side of my workshop 1000 x 700mm but the standard size for the cabin I've ordered is 1290 x 1000mm so they'll have to do. This was the view from the old workshop.

(http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee286/Arbalist/View.jpg)

The windows in the new cabin are double glazed units but I'll be fitting some cheap blinds to help control the light/heat in summer.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: John Hill on July 29, 2014, 11:37:01 AM
Hi Robert,  we moved house a few years ago and I had a new shop to move in to.  I choose an arrangement which I really like but I dont think I have seen anyone do quite the same.

My shop is about the same width as yours but a little longer.  I chose to not have any windows and instead put in skylights over the centre of the shop. 

I had a bench made, cast in concrete, which is in the middle of the shop and on it is my 12x36 lathe, a drill press,  small shaper, cold cut saw and my mill stands at the end.   The machines are on the bench with their backs to the back of the lathe which saves a lot of floor space as anything I need to do at the back of one I can do by reaching through from the other side of the bench.

There is one workbench with artificial light over it and a large tool board above it.  All the available wall space is taken up by cabinets etc

(https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6183/6145175391_ac66a9c986_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/an2CxR)IMGP9398 (https://flic.kr/p/an2CxR) by aardvark_akubra (https://www.flickr.com/people//), on Flickr

(https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6090/6145171633_b22cd13a54_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/an2Br4)IMGP9392 (https://flic.kr/p/an2Br4) by aardvark_akubra (https://www.flickr.com/people//), on Flickr

(https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6077/6145724682_c0bc20f561_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/an5rQo)IMGP9397 (https://flic.kr/p/an5rQo) by aardvark_akubra (https://www.flickr.com/people//), on Flickr
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on July 30, 2014, 12:30:56 AM
I just love the view from your window Arbalest and as I have a similar window view now and enjoy it I feel that a window over the bench in the new shop will be enjoyed especially as it will have a similar outlook. It provides me with "time out" when when working through tricky problems or whoopies.
John, I hadn't considered a skylight but will give it some serious thought. I do like your layout but having tried it on the CAD it looks a little tight for space with my dimensions.
Most of the shelving is the office metal type which can easily be moved around should it not work right the first time. It is really only the lathe and drill mill that would be somewhat tricky to move due to the weight. With the lathe up against a wall shelving behind it can hold the lathe tooling etc.
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/shop001_zps8e843b91.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/shop001_zps8e843b91.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/shop002_zps84d59a09.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/shop002_zps84d59a09.jpg.html)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: John Hill on July 30, 2014, 11:02:19 AM
Robert, I am a bit shy of shelves above my machines.  I know it might be handy to have things within reach but I have visions of stuff falling off the shelf and causing an accident when they drop onto a machine that is running.  I suppose there is only a very slight risk if the walls are brick or concrete and wont vibrate at all.  I also like to be able to access the back of the machines to change belts and make adjustments but most of all to run the broom/brush/vacuum through there once in a while.  There is a danger too in reaching over a machine that is running, which I am sure you would never do!

There is really not much space at all between my lathe and the cabinet which is behind me when standing at the lathe,  but I do have to be careful that all drawers are closed when doing something messy like sloshing coolant around or cutting cast iron!

The steel office furniture very good and I can really load the drawers without having things sagging etc.

John

Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Arbalest on July 30, 2014, 12:30:56 PM
This has been mentioned before, storing anything behind rotating machinery is not a good idea.  ;)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on August 16, 2014, 03:33:41 AM
Firstly, all my planning for workshop has come to nought as we were gazumped on the villa we thought we were buying.
Secondly, we are now buying a villa two doors up the street from the first one and the workshop possibilities are much better in that it has a bedroom with walk in wardrobe directly behind the garage.
Thirdly, the shop will be a bit larger than the first one with storage space where the wardrobe was.
Fourthly, there will be much less work and cost to convert it to a workshop. The modifications will be readily reversible should it be required to be returned to a bedroom if future owners require it. We still have 3 bedrooms anyway.
Fifthly, all the work can be done prior to us moving in.
Robert
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/WORKSHOP-1_zpseb9532fc.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/WORKSHOP-1_zpseb9532fc.jpg.html)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on September 17, 2014, 11:47:57 PM
After an extremely traumatic time we have finally settled on our Villa and now fully own it. The carpenter will make the new opening in the wall between the garage and what will be my store room (ex ward robe). this weekend and a week later we will move the lathe and mill etc. down. When I pulled up some of the carpet I found that there is a plywood covering over the concrete floor and I am wondering what to coat this with. Any ideas? It has been firmly fastened down with concrete nails.
Robert
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: ths on September 18, 2014, 11:01:11 AM
Assuming you don't want to lift the plywood, Masonite and vinyl over the top?

The plywood is possibly held down with a combination of the nails and a construction adhesive, removing all that may be a large and messy job, with no certainty as to what you're going to be left with. Still, a concrete floor is good for placing level sensitive machines on.

Best of luck, looks a good space. Hugh.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Roger B on September 20, 2014, 07:29:40 AM
Do you know my cousin, Gavin Bryant, in Terrigal? Could be a very small world!
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Arbalest on September 20, 2014, 10:47:55 AM
Plywood over concrete will be kinder to your feet, you can always drill through to the concrete for machine mounting if you need to. I've got a ply floor in my new workshop, I've just given it a few coats of floor paint.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on November 21, 2014, 06:09:34 AM
The new workshop is coming along fine with most of the shelving put up. I have left some wall space for my two charts of drill sizes and tapping charts. However my old charts are looking decidedly tired and the move did them no good at all so I am thinking of replacing them with new ones and I will have them laminated.
My original ones were given to me by industrial suppliers (I was the engineering manager at the time) but now unsure just where to obtain new ones.
I am sure you guys out there can point me in the right direction.
Robert
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: mklotz on November 21, 2014, 03:31:41 PM
Google is your friend.  I typed in "Starrett drill size chart" and was led to this page...

https://forum.solidworks.com/docs/DOC-2791

where you can download a PDF of the chart.

Do a bit more searching and you can probably find other charts as well.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on December 10, 2014, 01:12:56 AM
Two months have passed by with much work accomplished on our new home and in particular my workshop. It is now swarf making ready, but will await for the New Year to continue with the boiler build.
I pondered at length as to which way to locate the lathe and mill, the first obvious place for the lathe was on the right so as to give maximum room to the left to accommodate long items through the chuck. However that would mean the mill by the glass door and as it protrudes further forward than the lathe (somewhat restricting access through the door) I decided to have the lathe on the left, there is still 500mm behind the headstock to the wall. It is the opposite way around from where I had it in the previous work shop and at first looked strange but I am sure it will work just fine. I noted the comments regarding shelving over the lathe, but being stubborn I still put one there, however the front edging timber strip is raised 10mm above the shelf to prevent anything rolling off.
The bench by the window works well with plenty of natural light. The original bedroom walk in ward robe now serves as my store room and the entry into the work shop from the garage.
The timber floor is great as it is easy on the feet and will provide insulation in the winter when the temperature gets right down to as low as 8 centigrade outside.
I decided to give my drill/tapping charts a clean-up and had them laminated and they look good on the wall now.
Roger, I haven't come across your cousin Gavin yet, but I think there are around 11,000 residents here so maybe some clues could help.
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2301_zps53908ca2.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2301_zps53908ca2.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2303_zpse5e94c82.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2303_zpse5e94c82.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2304_zps1eb1e0af.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2304_zps1eb1e0af.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2302_zpsc8906b25.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2302_zpsc8906b25.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2305_zpsf9ce5bac.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2305_zpsf9ce5bac.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2299_zpscd84368f.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2299_zpscd84368f.jpg.html)
(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2298_zpsf8c2c729.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2298_zpsf8c2c729.jpg.html)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: b.lindsey on December 10, 2014, 01:18:39 AM
Most impressive Robert and well organized as well from the looks of things. It must be nice having that much room for your "man cave!!"  All it need now is some swarf come Jan 1 :)

Bill
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Don1966 on December 10, 2014, 02:25:30 AM
Oh man! That is a well organized shop. Very nice place Robert I just wish mine was that well organized. I guess I need to get off my duff and do something about it.
Thanks for sharing it with us.

Don
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Coopertje on December 10, 2014, 11:42:29 AM
Well done  :ThumbsUp: Like the cobra too!

Regards Jeroen
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: ShopShoe on December 10, 2014, 01:49:09 PM
Very Nice. Thanks for sharing your thought processes while planning.

--ShopShoe
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Tater on December 10, 2014, 03:10:21 PM
Very nice!  All that bright open space......  More like a man palace than a man cave. :-)
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on December 10, 2014, 07:31:09 PM
I think it looks great Robert.  It looks like you've made great use of the natural light and that's the best light  :ThumbsUp:..Is that a true and honest Cobra? Big or small block? If you haven't seen my Cyclone thread,  my blood runs deep big block Ford blue.  I thought you would like the timber floor.  I was on a new construction job years ago for Anaconda Aluminum and their whole machine shop was built on 8x8" oak timbers and it was finished like a hardwood floor and then they came in and soaked it with some kind of oil , prettiest darn floor you could imagine and you could spill anything on it and just wipe it up with a rag.

Eric
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: SHOPGUY on December 10, 2014, 10:08:09 PM
A very nice shop.
Lots of natural light and room.
Ernie J
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: ths on December 11, 2014, 05:20:40 AM
Lots of light in there, it must be a very pleasant place to get stuff done. Cheers, Hugh.
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: derekwarner on December 11, 2014, 06:07:02 AM
Well Robert.... I too noticed the Shelby Cobra........we also saw her in earlier snaps from the far northern previous workshop [possibly in your boiler build thread]......but who noticed the 25th Edition  :happyreader: of the Machinery Handbook in the new shop?.......I am also envious of the new workshop :cheers:.... Derek
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on December 14, 2014, 04:53:42 AM
Thanks guys for your kind compliments on the new workshop. Before continuing on the models I am making/fixing/doing small jobs in the shop that I have been meaning to do for a long time, e.g. extend the valve lever on the compressor so it is easier to turn.
Eric the Cobra is not really a real one just a scale model (12" to the foot) I knocked up a few years ago. It has a Windsor 302 EFI motor with a BW 5 speed box, suspension from a XJ6 jag. (narrowed by 6") there are some photos of it on my Intro page (page 14 - don't know how to add the link)
Robert
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Doc on December 14, 2014, 06:50:59 AM
That shop is WAAY TO CLEAN  ;) hahaha\\

Nice shop !!  Now get out there and make a mess (or am I the only one that has a mess)  ;D
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Robert Hornby on December 20, 2014, 10:42:48 PM
The workshop is very close to full operational condition, but as I promised myself I would not continue with the models until after the New Year I am still finding small things to do/make to make it user friendly. One of the things I have been meaning to do for many years is to sort out and organize my small diameter bar stock. It has just been laying in the lathe tray looking untidy and really needed some attention.

(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2310_zpsfe3356b7.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2310_zpsfe3356b7.jpg.html)
I suddenly had a few short lengths of PVC pipe in 25mm. 38mm and 60mm and in a moment of sudden awareness had the answer to the problem. A bonus was that I could actually make some swarf (but only PVC) whilst making the improvement. :cartwheel: I fitted a sleeve over the pipe to prevent damage from the steady ( I had some old PVC elbows which came in handy)

(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2314_zpsdef31ee0.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2314_zpsdef31ee0.jpg.html)

I tapped the plugs 1/4" BSW and screwed them to the angle iron.

(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2311_zps8bbb0a3b.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2311_zps8bbb0a3b.jpg.html)
Lengths were cut and plugs made, A length of 3 x  3  angle iron was brought into service for the support bracket (there would be a fair amount of weight to bear) and in no time at all a new addition to the shop was complete (the labels might just be a little over the top but I got a bit carried away) :naughty: My wife thinks I've got CDO which is a form of OCD with the letters arranged alphabetically  :lolb:

(http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u667/RobertHornby/IMG_2319_zpsc8f0ba87.jpg) (http://s1327.photobucket.com/user/RobertHornby/media/IMG_2319_zpsc8f0ba87.jpg.html)

Robert
Title: Re: New Workshop
Post by: Steamer5 on December 21, 2014, 04:41:25 AM
Hi Robert
 Nice storage, & thanks for another round to it!  :lolb: timely as I'm S5ing the shop!

Cheers Kerrin