Model Engine Maker

Supporting => Vehicles & Models => Topic started by: Dan Rowe on July 22, 2012, 03:31:03 AM

Title: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 22, 2012, 03:31:03 AM
I have spent a few years researching the drawing records of the Lima Locomotive Works and I have drawn 5 Shay locomotives and a really nifty geared 4 wheel critter with side rods all from original Lima records. The bulk of this work appeared in "Steam in the Garden" a small mom and pop magazine that was edited by the late Ron Brown a steamup buddy of mine and a real friend to the G1 live steam community,

The series of articles I wrote was titled The Nuts and Bolts of Shays and they are about the engineering of Shay locomotives. The series concluded with several articles that included all the drawings I could locate for Shop number 2800. This was a small 2' gauge 10 ton Shay with 2-6"x10" cylinders that ran at the Mapleton Tramway in Queensland Australia.

Issue #100 was the start of the Mapleton section Ron gave me a double fold out so the full up drawing was printed in the build scale of 7/8" to the foot. Both sides and the front and back of the locomotive are drawn full model size.

Here is the photo of Shop number 2800 posted with permission of the Allen County Historical Society Lima Ohio.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/2800-R.jpg)

The frame seamed like the logical place to start so I had to think about milling scale I beam to get a good looking model. I have tried several ways that did not give satisfactory results so this time I used a 100 tapered ball end mill after the 1/2" square 12L14 stock was roughed to size. Here is the set up for the mill.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Picture3.jpg)

I found out right off that I had to make the same cut on both sides of the frame stock to prevent warping. Here is the photo of the first attempt that proved that concept.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Picture2-1.jpg)

Here is the finished I beams and some channel stock for final inspection.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Framebeamschannel.jpg)

Next up is a bit of rivet practice, the tools are modified versions of what is in the Harris boiler book fitted to a heavy duty Starrett automatic center punch.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RivetTools.jpg)

The small section of brass stock is a guide that is 1.5 times thicker than the body of the rivet so i can use the flush cutter to leave the proper amount to from a rivet head the bucker for the vise is also shown.

Here is an early practice run the numbers more or less match what is in the boiler book but I reduced the operation to two dies for the center punch.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/DieRun12.jpg)

Here is a couple of  master patterns. The truss pads are right and left handed so I made a single master that the angle can be adjusted for either way. The left and right core are also shown. The little truss post guide was tricky to machine, I am really glad that I only have to make one of those. The grid is 1/4" square.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Trusspadpostguide.jpg)

Here are the parts for a test fit. The frame is 19.25" long.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/frame.jpg)

More to come to catch up to date.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: sbwhart on July 22, 2012, 07:06:13 AM
 Dad that will be a very interesting Loco Model what are scale are you building it to ?.

Some interesting stuff.

Stew
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ref1ection on July 22, 2012, 01:21:30 PM
Hi Dan, I'm very curious about the jig you used to mill the I-beam and wondered if you made that or parts are available?

Ray
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 22, 2012, 01:45:13 PM
Hi Stew,
The scale is 13.7:1 or 7/8" to the foot and it will run on G1 track which is 1.75" wide.
Edit: fixed the first post to mention scale.

Hi Ray,
The jig was made using Mitee-Bite uniforce stock. It comes in 20" lengths and it can be cut to make custom clamps. I used the full length as my finished beam is 19.25" long. I had to use another set of mill clamps to force the stock back into the jig after machining one side. The process was fairly tedious but the final results were worth the effort.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ref1ection on July 22, 2012, 03:30:02 PM
Thanks for the info on the clamps and I'll be watching this unfold. I've always had a soft spot for shay's and yours is looking great so far.

Ray
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 22, 2012, 06:21:14 PM
The Lima drawings that survived include some of the tools so I had to make some of the jacks that would have been included in the tool box for this Shay.

Here is the drawing of the smallest of the Lima jacks I have even seen a photo of one of these in use.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/15000JACKSCREWS.jpg)

I used a 10-32 hex head socket screw to make a set of 4 jacks in 7/8" scale. The big one is one of the projects I made in shop class in college.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Fivejacks.jpg)

The channel section was cut and drilled for the angle brackets. The ends are filed to fit the I beam profile.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Framechannels.jpg)

I am making both the Shays that went to the Mapleton Tramway. They were mainly the same built to the same plan but with some slight changes to the frame and a few other accessories like the boiler. The frame center plates proved very difficult to cast and as they are a fairly simple part that is easy to machine from solid I made the second set from solid.

I had a handy chunk of brass hex so the first step was to use the lathe for a center hole then over to the mill and the 5C indexer is used to rough out the shape.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CenterPlateMill.jpg)

Back to the lathe for the round sections and parting off.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CenterplateLathe.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CenterplateFinishedw3jaw.jpg)

Now to drill the cross holes.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CenterplateDrillGuide02.jpg)

Here is more scale stock made from hot rolled stock. I carefully kept the mill scale finish where it will show.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/ChannelsNangles04.jpg)

Here is a clamp and jig to drill the corner brackets.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CornerAnglesDrillFixture.jpg)

Now both sets of cross members assembled.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/CrossChnlCenterPlt.jpg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 28, 2012, 11:40:31 PM
Now time to drill the I beams for the frame spreader assembly.

Here is the first side with the drill jig clamped. The distance is set by the scale. The brass bar clamp is a third hand to make it easy to set the C clamp.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/FrameDrillClamped.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/FrameDrillingVistaView.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/FrameDrillingCloseUp.jpg)

Now the set up for clamping the other side with the same setting on the square.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/FrameDrillPreClamp.jpg)

I knocked off for the day and drilled the holes the first thing the next day only to find out that now the assembly did not match the drawing. This was not the first goof and most likely not the last one so I needed a new way to plug the bad holes.

I was using my Knipex pliers to smash tiny sections of rivets in the bad holes but I had to use blocks of steel to get past the beam flanges. This was a balancing act and a lot of the tiny rivet pieces fell out never to be seen again.
 
My solution was to add tool steel mashing blocks to the pliers which are simple to operate with one hand.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/MasherSetUpVista.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/MasherCloseUp.jpg)

This photo shows mashed rivet on the top and the same section repaired on the lower beam.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/MasherResultsErases.jpg)

Now the frame is taking shape.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Frameassbly.jpg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: arnoldb on July 29, 2012, 10:47:05 AM
The frame's coming along well Dan  :ThumbsUp:

I like the way you repaired the "bad" holes too!

Kind regards, Arnold
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 29, 2012, 05:39:23 PM
Thanks for stopping by Arnold. Things are going up so fast here it is really hard to keep up with all the great builds being posted.

I have a lost wax casting setup to make the parts I need for this project here is the casting bench.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/HMEM/casting/IMG_2214-2.jpg)

The blue box is the kiln and the orange box is the programmable controller. In the back the black box is the vacuum pump. The short blue box in the foreground is the vacuum table setup with a gasket for casting.

I mostly do small pours so I use a hand held crucible that I use the rosebud tip on my OA rig for the heat source. The stainless steel tubes are flasks for the investment.

I have an electric crucible but I have not really done many pours that need that much metal. The SS things are production flasks and at some time I will upgrade my operation to use them.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/HMEM/casting/2011-12-19125423.jpg)

Here is the rubber vulcanizer and the wax pot.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/HMEM/casting/2011-12-19114123.jpg)

Now to show how I make use of the equipment I will show the steps to make the drawheads.

First for a complicated part I start with wax and make a model 5% larger than the scale print. The drawhead used for S/N 2800 was unusual and I think it was a special case for the Mapleton Tramway. The drawhead on the left was the one used for the Gilpin #1 Shay and it is a lot more typical for small early Shays. I noticed the similarity so I made both at the same time.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Drawhead1.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Drawhead2.jpg)


The wax is cast to make a metal pattern for a rubber mold. This is the master and the core. The other core with the square edges was used to help make the wax pattern.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/drawheadmoldB.jpg)

Here is the whole assembly in a rubber mold frame ready for the rubber to be added.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/drawheadmoldA.jpg)

The rubber mold is shown cut open with the cores in place. The blue wax is ready for cleanup and investment.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/drawheadmoldC.jpg)

The finished drawhead is placed on a scale drawing for comparison.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Drawheadfinal-1.jpg)

Dan
 
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on July 29, 2012, 06:47:30 PM
Sweet set up Dan!

I'd forgotten about this build....I hadn't seen it in a while!

Dave

Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Alan Haisley on July 29, 2012, 08:35:14 PM
Dan,

This is great. Shays are really fascinating engines and following this build is bound to be an education.

Alan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ref1ection on July 30, 2012, 04:19:16 AM
Dan, thanks for showing how you do lost wax casting. Very interesting to see what's used and how.

Ray
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on July 30, 2012, 01:35:44 PM
Dave, Alan, and Ray thanks for the support. I was still writing the articles the last time I posted a new thread on this work. I thought that I could write and build at the same time boy was I wrong. :Jester:

In the process of documenting this work my wife Alicia who is usually the photographer found an early set of casting photos with her brother John helping with the oven.

I mostly use a hand held crucible as I mentioned and that takes all my hands one for the torch and one for the crucible...okey I see that I am holding both items in one hand and looking over my shoulder but the metal is not hot yet.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Web-0098heatJV_zpse1de7286.jpg)

Pouring the bronze after John took the flask out of the oven and placed it on the vacuum table and turned on the vacuum.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Web-0099pourJV_zps55c30b6a.jpg)

Molten bronze on vacuum table.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Web-0100flask_zps0f9ffcf9.jpg)

John inspecting the part just out of the investment.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Web-0106bearingcap_zps8f74a271.jpg)

Here is the piece just cast with a few other early Shay castings and a Stock Drive Products bevel gear.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Web-0110metalparts_zpsd3ebed1b.jpg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 03, 2012, 07:18:45 PM
Back to the frame here are the drill blocks for the frame. The reason there are 2 in the photo is the top one is like the drawing. I used thicker channel then the drawing so I had to make a new block to match my stock.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/DrillJig03STRT.jpg)

I made the I beam the true overall cross section size with a thicker web. On second thought I should have matched the flange dimensions and made a wider beam. That would have given the correct flange depth to rivet to not a slightly narrower flange. I need all the room I can get to rivet to the flange.


This is the drill guide to drill the frame angles attached to the ends of the I beams.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/DrillJig01DIAG.jpg)

Here is the full set of running board brackets for Shay Plan 1553. The short ones are on the left or the fireman's side and the long ones are on the engine side with the engineer.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RunBrdBrack-6ofEm443x468.jpg)

This is the bending and drilling tool. The top screw acts as a stop and a clamp for drilling.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RunBrdBrack-Jig-Side554x214.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RunBrdBrack-Jig-Top610x192.jpg)
 

The setup to bend the odd short bracket.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RunBrdBrack-Jig-inUse686x280.jpg)

Both styles of left side brackets with a slice of I beam stock.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/RunBrdBrack-OnIbeam568x293.jpg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 04, 2012, 03:59:01 PM
The holes for riveting the running board brackets to the I beam were drilled in both parts with a single setup. Here is the drill guide.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/DrillJig02STRT.jpg)

And here is the setup in the drill vise.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/DrillingRunBrdBrkt01.jpg)

I made two small blocks that just fit in the I beam flange.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/BuckFrameSetupSTRT.jpg)

I used the drill guide to spot the holes then used a ball end mill to make the pocket for the rivet head. I goofed with the first attempt so I did a second try.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/BuckBackSTRT.jpg)

This is the setup to rivet the running board bracket.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/BuckingRivets01.jpg)

I made another jig for the grab irons. 14 gauge fence wire is nearly exactly the size required but simply smashing it would not make tabs large enough so a fabrication seamed the simple way.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/GrabIronJig02.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/GrabIronJig03.jpg)

Here is the silver solder operation and a finished bracket.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/GrabIron-SilverSolder01-Before.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/GrabIron-SilverSolder02-Left.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/GrabIron.jpg)

Here is the frame still missing the grab irons and a bunch of other parts.
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Frame02.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Frame08.jpg)
I have several more frame parts in progress and I will add them when they are complete.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 12, 2012, 03:35:31 PM
I am making forward progress on this project. The end timber braces will be attached to the bottom end of the frame rails and the end timbers. The last photo in the previous post shows the location of the braces.

The end timber braces are different on the Dulong and the Mapleton. The old forged braces were replaced with a steel casting by the time the Mapleton was built. I made a pattern for a casting but I was not happy with it and rubber molds are not the best for holding close tolerances. I decided to have a go at machining the brace.

I chose some true wrought iron as it is easy to machine and I just like working old iron. The piece I used had spent over 50 years as part of a boat house on lake Michigan and I suspect that was not the first use.

Here is the stock in the chuck to bore a 1/2" hole.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812074138.jpeg)

I do not have a DRO on my mill so I added mill stops to the X axis to make milling a pocket simpler. I have a set of round gauge blocks tapped 1/4-28 so I tapped the ends of the stops for the same thread.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812074301.jpeg)

This is the setup to mill the pocket with a 1/8" ball mill. The coaxial indicator located the 1/2" hole and the other indicator is to calculate the backlash on the y axis.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812074435.jpeg)

This photo shows the original stock with very heavy rust. Notice the fracture section which really shows the grain structure of wrought iron.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812074855.jpeg)

I used sacrificial backers to mill the braces to length. The web section is 0.055" and most likely would have taken the light cuts but I hate taking chances.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812074630.jpeg)

The milling is complete and the parts are ready to be cut in two sections.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812075006.jpeg)

Here is the full set of end timber braces ready to be drilled for the frame and the timbers. They are not steel castings but I like the way they look.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-120812075114.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on August 12, 2012, 03:43:12 PM
Nice set up Dan,  I like the stop blocks from gage blocks trick,,,,those were originally made for that application.

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on August 12, 2012, 04:26:11 PM
I just finished reading the thread. Fascinating.
Looking forward to seeing more.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 18, 2012, 08:55:26 PM
Zee thanks for the support. Dave nice to know that. I am working on a Y stop using a micrometer head I just got cheep. I liked the way you did that with the file roller.


I finished the frame timber braces. They needed a spot face for the bolts. The scale hole size worked out to 0.059" which works really good for a 0-80 bolt.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-180812130438.jpeg)

I made a drill guide to drill the rivet holes for the timber brace and the frame at the same time. The guide needed clearance for the radius so I used a small center drill to mill the slot and the clearance at the same time.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-180812130634.jpeg)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-180812130823.jpeg)

I worked myself into a bit of a corner as I have already added the running board brackets to the first frame. Well I forgot the hose brackets on the left side. Most Shays were equipped with a siphon that is a steam educator to pump water from a near by water source. The siphon was used on the Mapleton Tramway and several photos show the hose and one shows water being pumped from a line side tank.

It took me a while to come up with a solution and it was a tiny rivet press. The body of the press is 1/4" steel, and the screw is a 8-32. The gap in the press was cut after the hole was blind tapped for the bottom die. The upper section of the bottom die has a 5/64" hex so it can be installed with a nut driver. I tapped a small section of aluminum round to hold the screw and bottom die for machining. I used another screw to lock the bottom die in the holder. The pointed screw in the holder was used to mark the high and low point of operation of the press to check for tool clearance. The hose bracket was attached flat and rolled for the hose after it was attached.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-180812131044.jpeg)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-180812131209.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 25, 2012, 08:53:30 PM
I got a bit of shop time for painting. The top frame is the Mapleton and the bottom frame is the Dulong.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-250812125518.jpeg)
I really hate to paint but I had to get to it sometime.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Tin Falcon on August 25, 2012, 09:19:53 PM
Here are a couple of pics of the Shay @ Rough and Tumble Museum in Kinzers PA



(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss301/TinFalcon/RTShayR.jpg)
(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss301/TinFalcon/RTShayL.jpg)

I am toying with the Idea of getting the early Kozo Shay book but I need the motivation  and dedication for such a project. Looks like good progress on yours.

Tin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 25, 2012, 09:42:25 PM
Hi Tin,
You most likely already know that the photos are a replica of a Shay. It has a Soule twin for a steam engine. Here is one of the engines.
LOhUOzhW3Gg
Kozo's first Shay is a good choice and I considered that build but I located the sources of Lima Locomotive Works drawings and I decided to attempt a miniature scale version.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Tin Falcon on August 25, 2012, 11:11:43 PM
I am no expert on shays I am not even a locomotive guy at least not yet. I do like the little shay at Kinzer. I did buy a Kozo A-3 switcher book. but the more I think or it the more I like the shay and since I tend to display models @ R & T if I a going to build a loco a shay would be an appropriated one. And one close to old No 4.
I do know that shays were built for 67 years during that time the company changed hands 4 times there were 4 different classes of shay. I also expect that these were not exactly mass produced and Each one has its own detail and character built in at the factory and later modified buy the owner(s). and changes made during restorations. So there is an opportunity to copy no 4 or use a little creativity. this is not a project I expect to start soon . but I may consider building the engine and feed pump that could be a good start. and a bit more doable in the short term.
Lots of shay info here .
http://www.shaylocomotives.com/ (http://www.shaylocomotives.com/)
Tin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 25, 2012, 11:33:50 PM
Hi Tin,
I am not going to say I am a Shay expert either. I do have enough Lima paper records to paper the whole house at least 4 times by my calculation a few years back... I mentioned that to my wife and she said "Tell me something I don't know you big idiot"

I was one of the original helpers on the Shaylocomotives.com site and I worked with the mechanical database compiled by George Kadelak and checked it with the Lima records for data accuracy.

All this was good fun and a real education on the Lima drafting office system but that does not get an engine built and I decided to move on.

Some folks might remember my mention of a 1/5 scale Shay but I have dropped out of that project to focus on what is on my workbench.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on September 01, 2012, 11:21:54 PM
I am making headway on reassembly of the frames after painting them.

The Mapleton end timbers are nearly complete. I have to cast up the push pole pockets and add them. The Mapleton end timbers are not typical Shay construction. The L angle stiffners were not normally used. The Dulong end timbers when complete will show the typical Shay construction.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912150837.jpeg)

My new plan for the carriage bolts is to use 1.2mm nickle silver optical screws. They come with a cheese head with no slot. I just rivet the heads and trim to length. I was using 3/64" steel rivets that I was threading 00-90... that was a lot of work for not really satisfying results.

The nickle silver 1.2mm nuts are 2.2mm AF which is a bit large for a 1.2mm bolt. I made a test mandrel to see if it was simple to cut them down to 5/64" using my 24 pin 5C indexer. This worked so I made a mandrel with matching 3/16" hex ends. The flat on the top matches the key on my 3/16" hex collet which has points up when the indexer is at zero. I drilled a hole so I could install a replaceable 1.2mm screw to mount the nut. The other bit in the photo is a hex file button to reduce the nuts with a file. That works fine but it is slow and after I dropped the third one never to be seen again  :wallbang: I needed a new method.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912151235.jpeg)(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912151415.jpeg)

Here is a photo of my small bolt choices.
Top-- 12 BA the bolt head is 2.5mm and larger than the BA standard.
Second--00-90 brass bolt with 5/64" hex.
Third--1.2mm optical screw with 2.2mm nut.
Fourth--1.2mm optical screw with riveted head and 5/64" nut.
Fifth--1.2mm brass with 5/64" nut
Sixth--3/64" steel rivet with 00-90 thread
Bottom--1.2mm shop made bolt with 5/64" hex head and 5/64" square nut.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912151646.jpeg)

I am using a small press to rivet the heads of the optical screws. The scrws are 9/16" long so I drilled a 1.2mm hole in a 1/2" block of steel. To eject the finished screw I just press the die on a flat hard surface an screw pops out.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912151937.jpeg)

Here are some fancy jewelry items that have 1.2mm threaded holes. There is all sorts of studs available including skulls and spiders.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-010912152143.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on September 01, 2012, 11:36:21 PM
Really looks good.

And, I got an idea for shortening my bolts to size. Don't know why. But thanks!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 05, 2013, 07:02:10 PM
I have made a bit of progress on this project. I have nearly all of the frame castings done so that section is nearly complete.

I made the push pole pocket and the frame brace pad from metal so a rubber mold is a one step process to get castings. Here are the Mapleton push pole castings and the frame brace pads.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-241212093612.jpeg)

With more complex parts I usually start with wax and cast a metal pattern. Here are the patterns for the steam jamb and old style push pole pockets for the Dulong, brake rods and the boiler pad clamp.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113083116.jpeg)

Here are the machine steps for the boiler pad clamps. The casting has a cored hole that is drilled to tap 0-80. Then it can be bolted the fixture shown in the center. The sprue is trimmed and the top is faced in the mill.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113083532.jpeg)

The final step is to drill the rest of the holes.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113083702.jpeg)

Here are the steps to machine the frame brace pads. They are for the smokebox brace. The sprue end was chucked up and a light cut to true up the spud was made. The part was reversed and the sprue/chucking piece was cut true and the back side of the flange faced. Light cuts with a sharp tool are the order of the day. And remember which way to turn the hand wheels I stuffed one with a senior moment.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113083845.jpeg)

The final lathe operation is to face the spud and tap it 1-72. Cut off the sprue and file the back was the final operation not shown.

The chucking piece I left on the smaller push pole pocket did not really center well with a scroll chuck so I chopped it off and used the 4 jaw chuck. I used the back edge of a tool holder to center the flat sides of the casting.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113185902.jpeg)(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-040113185952.jpeg)

I set the hand wheels to zero after centering the first casting and it was simple to quickly set the other castings square for the machine work. I used a small end mill in the tailstock to cut the counter bore but as it starts on an angled surface slow feed is needed until it makes a full cut.

The old style push pole pocket has a square hole for a square head bolt. I used a section of the same steel square square stock that was used for a core and drilled a hole in the center. This was used as a drill guide to for the hole. I used a thin section of plywood and drilled for the sprue and the four pins on the back. The sprue extends past the plywood and is clamped in the vise.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-050113110501.jpeg)

Here is a shot of the new parts for both the Dulong and the Mapleton. I am missing one of the boiler pad clamps but I only intend to add the clamp that has a common rivet with one of the running board brackets. The other boiler pad clamps will be located when the boiler is installed.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-050113110700.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 05, 2013, 07:42:44 PM
Looks like good progress.
Glad to see you back at it.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on January 05, 2013, 11:57:49 PM
That looks great Dan...I've read accounts of the horrible accidents that have occured with the use of "polling pockets",  I'm glad these beautiful castings are for a model!

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 06, 2013, 01:44:10 AM
Yeah Dave I hear you....jousting with a locomotive what could possibly go wrong?? :lolb:

 :cheers:

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Thayer on January 06, 2013, 02:46:48 AM
Dan,

This is looking great! I love the early Shays and will definitely be following your build.  Question for you. Any idea why I can't see the images in posts 6-14?  All others show just fine.

Thayer
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 06, 2013, 02:35:11 PM
Thayer,
Thanks it seams like the site I used for the photos is gone. I will fix the problem soon. Thanks for the interest and the heads up on the missing photos.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Thayer on January 06, 2013, 03:49:26 PM
Thanks Dan, I look forward to seeing them.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 06, 2013, 10:05:13 PM
I poured some steam jambs today. I will give them a go in the lathe tomorrow.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-060113145356.jpeg)

The missing photos have been replaced.
Many thanks to the admins for enabling the edit post feature. :ThumbsUp:

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Thayer on January 07, 2013, 04:41:33 AM
Quite nice Dan!

Thanks for going through the effort. That casting rig looks like it could be pretty handy from time to time.

Thayer
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 09, 2013, 01:12:14 AM
Yes a casting rig is handy for multiple parts but it is an on going learning curve. I started to use the electric crucible on the last few casting sessions and I like it a lot, way less noise than the torch at full throttle.

Here is the steam jamb in the lathe set up for a 7/32 reamer. I made the ends long enough so one could be used for chucking and the other one for the steady rest.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-080113165752.jpeg)

I made the cylinder ends and I already had castings for the gland. The steel part in the center is a drill guide to tap the cylinder for 1.2mm studs. That will be first thing tomorrow morrining.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-080113170751.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 09, 2013, 11:00:48 PM
Here is the setup for drilling the holes for the 1.2mm studs. Having a dial and an accurate depth stop makes this a fairly simple job. Only 8 studs Jo :NotWorthy:

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-090113153604.jpeg)

Switching to the tap stand I used one of the covers and a spacer to bolt the cylinder to the vise.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-090113153735.jpeg)

Here is the finished steam brake cylinder. The fixture for drilling and tapping and the mandril I used to face the cylinder ends are the other bits in the photo.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/4/213-090113153849.jpeg)

Will it be a working steam brake cylinder?? 

I left that as a future option as a working locomotive is first.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Jo on January 10, 2013, 07:36:47 AM
Only 8 studs Jo   8)

 :o That looks a very small vise to be using to hold such a long casting. Were you not worried it might move and break the drill? :paranoia:

Nice looking little drilling machine 8)

Jo
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 10, 2013, 12:57:53 PM
Jo,
Yes I was a bit worried, but the casting is bolted to a plate which is clamped in the vise. I did not have enough head room for a larger vise. I just peck drilled the holes as the guide was fairly tall for such a small drill.

Yes I really like that drill press most of my work is small to tiny which is a perfect fit.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 06, 2013, 09:34:51 PM
I have finished riveting all the parts on both Shay frames so that milestone is worth a progress photo.

(http://i586.photobucket.com/albums/ss307/shayloco/MEM/Mapleton/Frame_7jul13-01-Done-web-small_zps3bd04ca5.jpg) (http://s586.photobucket.com/user/shayloco/media/MEM/Mapleton/Frame_7jul13-01-Done-web-small_zps3bd04ca5.jpg.html)

The next section will be the trucks, I will be using Stock Drive bevel gears for this build. I am not ready to cut proper scale gears yet.

When I get to the engine it is a two cylinder marine style vertical so I will cover that section here with all the machine steps.

If anyone is interested in more detail on this project it can be found here:
http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php?topic=1357.0

If you have Shay questions you can ask there or at the LivesteamShays yahoo group which could use some excitement.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: b.lindsey on August 06, 2013, 09:42:25 PM
Looks like you have been busy on those frames Dan...or did you make your little assistant do all that riveting for you :)

Bill
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on August 07, 2013, 01:14:59 AM
That's great work Dan!...those are brake cylinders?

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on August 07, 2013, 01:29:34 AM
Bill, thanks that little assistant keeps wanting better tools...I already made him a bunch of tongs and several hammers but I think he is just collecting tools.

Dave yes those are the brake cylinders. I think they will be dummy cylinders for now but I can make a working unit with the castings.

I have to add the running boards and deck boards. A nice wood working job.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: b.lindsey on August 07, 2013, 01:50:43 PM
It's so hard to find good help these days!! :lolb: :lolb:

Bill
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on September 29, 2013, 07:56:08 PM
All the deck boards, running boards and foot boards are in place. It took 76 screws and nuts all 1.2mm for each loco.

I was not really prepared for just how plain this would look. It looks like a barn floor.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280913090112.jpeg)

Here is the bottom side.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280913090208.jpeg)

I liked the saw marks so I left them on the bottom side.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on September 29, 2013, 08:05:48 PM
This build is epic!.....this is an awesome build!....Love seeing the updates!

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: b.lindsey on September 29, 2013, 08:24:23 PM
Doesnt look plain to me...nice work and glad to see the update too'

Bill
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ths on September 29, 2013, 10:04:59 PM
Better than a barn room floor.

Hugh.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on September 30, 2013, 02:42:03 AM
Thanks guys, the water tank sits on most of the rear deck so most of the wood is hidden. The wood is maple because I like how dense it is and the end gran looks good for the scale. I will post updates when ever there is something interesting to show.

 :DrinkPint:
Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: metalmad on September 30, 2013, 03:14:30 AM
Hi Dan
I live about half an hour away from Maroochdore, I wonder if this Engine is still up there somewhere.
Looking great Buddy.  :praise2: :praise2:
Pete
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on September 30, 2013, 03:27:19 AM
Thanks Pete,
Parts of both Shays were saved. I worked with the museum director using my knowledge of the drawings to determine which parts were from which loco. The only part we are not sure about is the steam engine. The frame and boiler are from the Mapleton but the trucks are from the Dulong.  The existing  loco was named Shay and it is located here: http://www.nambourmuseum.org.au/

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: metalmad on September 30, 2013, 03:40:58 AM
Thanks for the link Dan
when I get up that way next I will go have a look :ThumbsUp:
Pete
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Maryak on September 30, 2013, 04:40:08 AM
I'm pretty sure there is a working Shae near Cairns used for the tourists and I think it's 2'6" gauge, Gympie also rings a bell. (Well it was 20 years ago and I was too busy looking out for crocs). Nothing quite like a big salty for focusing the attention.

Best Regards
Bob
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: joe d on September 30, 2013, 04:52:03 AM
Hi Dan

I've been following along for a while without taking the time to say "Well done, Sir!", sorry, so, WELL DONE, SIR!

Looking good, and I really like your maple decking too :ThumbsUp:

Looking forward to more progress.

Cheers, Joe
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on October 01, 2013, 01:49:47 AM
Bob, I am not sure which that one could have been. There are only 3 Shays in Australia that i know of and unfortunately none of them are operational. The one being restored at the Illawarra Light Railway was 2' 6" originally but the trucks from the Mapleton S/N 2800 which are 2' gauge are being used for the rebuild. They have a frame, trucks and the crankshaft everything else will have to be made from scratch.
http://www.ilrms.com.au/

The Shay at Puffing Billy came from Tiawan and I am not sure if it was ever operational on the line. They did just recently restore the Climax and it is now on the operational roster. http://www.puffingbilly.com.au/about-puffing-billy/workshop-updates/

Here is the list of surviving Shays:
http://www.shaylocomotives.com/surviving/SLc-Survivors.htm

Joe thanks I am guilty of reading your Minne thread and just lurking also good luck with the hydro.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on October 02, 2013, 02:25:39 AM
I never found a drawing of the step backs but they show up clearly in a lot of photos. The curved edges is a really interesting detail. I need 7 step backs for both Shays so I drew up a file guide so I could use my die filler to make them identical.

Here is the drawing and 2 plates marked out for machining.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-011013182727.jpeg)

I used the mill for all the holes and I tapped one plate for 1.2mm bolts and the other plate has clearance holes and is used as a drill guide for the wood blanks. The die filler made the angle cuts on the plates. I then used the die filer to reduce the wood to match the metal plates.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-011013182825.jpeg)

I really like the extra detail of this part all the rest of the wood has straight lines so it makes the curves stand out.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 02, 2014, 05:56:58 PM
It has been a while since I posted here but the time has been spent on the drafting board with Alibre PE. The trucks are what is in the works. The 1907 Repair Parts catalog has a photo of the exact truck I am building. Here is the page from my collection.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160913181504.jpeg)

The first thing up was to draw the gear. The pitch of the full size gear is 1.5" circular pitch. This with a long face width of 4" makes the scale version a very fine gear at the small end. I decided to give Shapeways another try with printed stainless steel gears. The original gear set is a 37/15 tooth set. I wanted the teeth to be a bit larger so I removed 2 teeth from the big gear and a single tooth from the small gear to make a 35/14 tooth set. I kept the pitch cone OD the same for the big gear and reworked the numbers. I used Gear Wheel Designer for the gear tooth profiles and I used the dfx of the tooth profiles at the big end and the small end to loft the tooth profile.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-020314100726.jpeg)

Here is the results from Shapeways. There was a bit of some type of grit in the gaps and it can be seen opposite the pinion. It was easy to remove with a tooth pick and mych better than the tech over cleaning a gear tooth. They are a bit rough but with a bit of grinding in I think they will work just fine and they are a lot cheaper gears that can be bought and have to be modified to something that is not right. The face length of modern gears is much shorter than what I need. This fact also made me reject the parallel depth method of making bevel gears.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-210214102257.jpeg) 

The next thing up was the line shaft bearings. My plan is to have Shapeways print these in brass or bronze as they are a small part and I do not want to pour a different alloy. I use silicone bronze which is not a good choice for bearings. The Shapeways bronze is 90% copper 10% tin so which will make a better bearing the brass or bronze?

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-020314103316.jpeg)

Here is the right truck bearing box from the back side with the lineshaft bearing and axle bearing in place. My plan is to have Shapeways make the master patterns for me in bronze. Then I will make a rubber mold for wax and use the lost wax process to make the parts.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-020314104725.jpeg)

Here is the left side showing how to remove the axle bearing by removing the cover than the thrust pad. The real axle bearing had a small T slot so it could be pulled out after the weight was taken off the bearing with jacks. I might tap a small hole so I can use a threaded rod to pull the bearing. The right side workes the same way the lineshaft and bearings have to be removed then the axle bearing can be changed. This was very handy for locos that did not have a large shop to maintain them in the woods.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-140214121108.jpeg)

Dan





Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on March 02, 2014, 07:32:21 PM
Happy to see another post here. Amazing project.
I took the opportunity to review the thread.
What a project!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on March 02, 2014, 07:39:02 PM
Dan

Check your email....

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 02, 2014, 10:09:13 PM
Thanks guys for stopping by. I finished drawing the truck parts and much to my surprise Shapeways raw brass or bronze can even handle the casting numbers on the patterns in my scale. That was so cool I had to draw a tiny set of numbers to use on the patterns.

Here is the brake shoe with the brake head and hanger rod. The small holes on the back of the brake head will be for 1.2mm U bolts that hold the head onto the brake beam.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-240214181936.jpeg)

Here is the brake rigging all made up with out the shoes. I was hoping it would work in the assembly drawing but there are to many pivots and no way to constrain the shoe to move radially to the tire.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-270214094601.jpeg)

Now here is the rest of the truck assembly missing the brake rigging.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280214210046.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 17, 2014, 01:27:23 PM
My Shapeways order of 11 bronze patterns arrived a week ago. They look really good and the casting numbers came out just fine. I ordered them raw but it looks like they polished them anyway because they are really shiny and that makes it hard to take a photo. The parts that should fit together work fine having a replaceable brake shoe is really cool....just need working brakes.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-300314090223.jpeg)

I have been busy in the shop making cores for the truck patterns. Some of the patterns do not need a core they only need a sprue to be attached for a rubber mold.

Here are the simple ones. The top is the brake beam fulcrum, the right is the brake shoe, the left is the left box cover, and the bottom is the center column.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185051.jpeg)

These two were a bit more complex. The right one is the right box cover with 7 pins, and on the left is the brake head with 6 pins.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185221.jpeg)

The truck boxes were a bit more complicated and they will require a repair in the wax stage to fix holes left by removing the core. Here is the left side with the core in.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185526.jpeg)

Here is the left box with the core removed. The brass pin is the oil hole.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185620.jpeg)

Here is the right box which needed cores for the lineshaft bearing and the axle bearing.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185721.jpeg)

Here is the right box with the core removed. The brass pin is the oil hole again.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160414185837.jpeg)

Now to attach the sprues and make rubber molds.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: tvoght on April 17, 2014, 02:18:59 PM
I must have missed or forgotten that you were going to have these patterns printed by Shapeways. Fascinating.
I'm looking forward to seeing the molding process in detail.

--Tim
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 17, 2014, 03:29:33 PM
Very cool stuff.
The Shapeways stuff is interesting. Reminds me of Jo's posts about the...don't have the right terms...cornice? The tops of the pillars/posts where tel had the suggestion of using a brass bullet cartridge.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 17, 2014, 11:51:33 PM
Tim, I will take a few extra photos of the molding process. I have made variations of all these parts before starting with wax to make metal patterns these are a lot closer to to true scale models.

Carl yes I remember that Victorian column detail. I would have made a wax model to make a metal pattern, but it was interesting to see how others would tackle the problem.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on April 18, 2014, 12:05:48 AM
Nice parts Dan!   I would love to see the process!   Stan was telling me about a Jewelers casting medium...though I can't for life of me remember the name of it.

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Alan Haisley on April 18, 2014, 02:22:56 PM
Nice parts Dan!   I would love to see the process!   Stan was telling me about a Jewelers casting medium...though I can't for life of me remember the name of it.

Dave
I think that was Delft clay.

Alan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 23, 2014, 12:08:17 AM
Thanks for stopping by Dave and Alan. I took some shots with my cell phone as I did the truck box molds to document the process.

Here is the setup with 8 rubber sections per mold. One side of the rubber has a yellow printed cloth cover and the other side has a thin blue plastic covering to keep it clean as the pattern is cut out. There are 2 pieces of the mold frame held with pins top and bottom.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414134540.jpeg)

Here is the first half of the molds done. I use the cardboard template to locate the 4-40 acorn nuts I use for mold locks. The top section of the mold frame has been added. I trace the pattern on the cloth back and then cut out the rubber to fit around the pattern. I use the cut cloth back as a pattern to mark the next layer of rubber.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414134702.jpeg)

Now both molds are full and the cloth cover was left on for the outside of the first and last layer of rubber.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414134907.jpeg)

Both molds in the vulcanizer at 3070 for one hour.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135006.jpeg)

Still hot!!! The excess rubber just flows out between the mold frame and the heated plates.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135052.jpeg)

Now to carefully cut the mold. I use the dental probe to locate the acorn nuts in the corners and cut them out first so I do not miss them. The can opener C-clamped to the bench has had the sharp edges removed and it acts as a fixed finger to hold the mold open as a sharp scalpel is used to cut the rubber. This is the left side pattern removed and the core pieces in the rubber mold.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135146.jpeg)

This is the right box mold with the pattern removed and the core in place.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135243.jpeg)

Now it is time to heat up the wax pot. I push the mold on to the valve and hold it for a count of 15 seconds. I have about 10psi on the pot. There is a thin section of plywood on the top and bottom of the mold so my finger clamp will have equal pressure on the mold.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135447.jpeg)

Finally this enough of the boxes for one Shay. I need three times that plus a few spares. I only knocked two of the sprues off with clumsy handling. I like it when I do not have to add a sprue for casting metal.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-220414135534.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dave Otto on April 23, 2014, 01:21:41 AM
Interesting process, thanks for the step by step.

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on May 26, 2014, 09:46:45 PM
I made all the molds and realized that this is way more molds than I have made at one time. The old method of plywood for holding the molds together needed an upgrade. I cut some 1/8 aluminum plate and some wood spacers. I used 4-40 acorn nuts and thumb screws to hold the plates. Now I do not have to wait until the wax cools before I can set the mold down.

Here is a set of truck wax parts cooling in the molds.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-260514133617.jpeg)

Two of the molds did not work out so I have to redo the wheel center and the spring plate. The rest of the parts came out really nice.
Here is a tray of parts for 3 Shays with a few extras just in case.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-260514133741.jpeg)

I still have to repair the bearing boxes and I will show how I did that in the next post.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamer on May 26, 2014, 10:53:33 PM
NICE POST!..... :praise2:


This is awesome.....lot's to learn here!

Dave
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ths on May 26, 2014, 11:58:14 PM
Daves right, it is awesome. Looking forward to more of this project. Hugh.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on May 27, 2014, 01:47:44 AM
Thanks Dave and Hugh, using Shapeways for the patterns has really improved the the whole process of making wax molds.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Johnmcc69 on May 27, 2014, 02:34:00 AM
Fascinating! Thank you for the step-by-step pix & explanation!

 Beautiful work...

 John
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on May 28, 2014, 12:12:09 AM
Thanks John I am glad that folks are enjoying the step by step. It helps me to remember to snap photos as I work.

The left box has two sections that need repair. The first one up is the back door I needed to remove the core for the oil box.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-270514130324.jpeg)

I made a section of machinable wax that just fit in the door. I left a chamfer on three sides of the casting around the hole so I could glue the plug with wax. I set the calipers the thickness of the back wall and marked the wax section for depth. Then glue the sides and cut the wax section flush with the back and clean up the surface. The three left boxes show the process start to finish.

The other repair is to the back of the oil cellar. This is where the cotton waste is used to wick the oil back to the axle bearing. This is the same fix for both the left and right bearing boxes so I am showing the right side.

I made a section of 1/4" a bit less than half round in wax and steel and a section of aluminium square to fit the bearing box. I use a small miter box to cut the wax sections after I add a small chamfer on the round edge for the glue.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-270514130546.jpeg)

Here is the process. The middle photo shows the wax door ready to be installed and glued.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-270514130836.jpeg)

This is a larger view showing most of the tools. I use the alcohol lamp to heat a small fine point spatula that I use to glue the wax. The wax for glue is a soft flexible wax that can be easily scraped flush with blunt hobby knife blade.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-270514131016.jpeg)

It is time for my summer vacation so the casting the parts will have to wait until I get back in my shed.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ths on May 28, 2014, 09:24:24 AM


It is time for my summer vacation so the casting the parts will have to wait until I get back in my shed.

Dan

Oh, how I hate summer.

Hugh.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: ttrikalin on November 14, 2014, 02:11:46 AM
just discovered this thread


I AM SPEECHLESS...
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 14, 2014, 02:37:13 PM
Hi Tom,
Thanks, I got sidetracked a bit with microcontrollers, but I will be casting up some new parts soon. I have to clean up the casting bench today.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 26, 2014, 05:14:23 PM
I finally got the casting bench setup again and cast the first of the new truck parts. They came out very good. All the parts worked fine the casting numbers show and the oil hole cores were successful.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-261114083036.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Roger B on November 26, 2014, 05:29:59 PM
I know almost nothing about casting but those look magnificent to me  :praise2:  :praise2:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: RonGinger on November 26, 2014, 11:58:21 PM
Can you tell us a bit about the casting bench? Do you use a vacuum under the flasks? I have tried to pour a couple investments but fail to get full parts just pouring into the flask.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 27, 2014, 12:31:59 AM
Ron,
I use a vacuum table to vacuum the investment in the flasks and for casting. I will take a couple of photos tomorrow when the light is better and describe my one man operation. I just finished vacuuming a set of 6 flasks for a casting session tomorrow.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 30, 2014, 01:58:59 AM
Here is a photo of my casting bench set up to vacuum casting flasks. The kitchen timer on the oven is to keep track of the time for mixing the investment. It has a 10 minute working time and has to be mixed then vacuumed in the mixing bowl, then poured in the flasks and vacuumed again as shown in the photo. Needless to say everything has to be in the right place because the investment will be hard as a rock 12 minutes after the powder is added to the water.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-291114175813.jpeg)

This photo shows my vacuum casting process. The vacuum table now has a flask with a red hot bronze center the photo just shows bright white. The open crucible is also  glowing red hot. The flasks pored before are stacked on fire brick in front of the burn out kiln. The orange box on the side of the kiln is the programmable controller and the display flashes between kiln temperature and hold times.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-291114175916.jpeg)

After the sprues are cut off and the investment removed the castings go in to the pickle pot. Here is the first bunch.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-291114180621.jpeg)

Upper right is the assembled brake head and shoe with separate castings below. The top left are the center plates one has a couple of bronze bubbles. These are air bubbles that did not dislodge. The vacuum table is on springs and I use a wrench to vibrate the table during vacuuming but some times bubbles stick anyway. Usually a whack with a small cold chisel solves the problem. The lower section shows the right and left truck boxes with and without covers.

The truck columns did not work as well as well. Three out of four have cold shorts where the center columns did not fill completely. The cores did work but the wax parts were leaning towards the back side so all the cold shorts are on the front. I will lean the wax the other way so if there is a cold short it will be on the back side and that is really not much of an issue because it can not be seen.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-291114180745.jpeg)

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: fumopuc on November 30, 2014, 07:42:30 AM
Hi Dan, thanks for the pictures and explanation of your investment casting bench. The people here in Bavaria, Germany are using only one word to express their tribute, "respect".
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 14, 2014, 10:42:59 PM
Thanks for the complement Achim like most things it takes practice.

I have been casting new stuff for this project and now I have a complete set of castings for one truck. I solved the problem with the center column by adding sprues to the sides which are the thickest cross section. This worked and solved the problem of the thick section robbing metal as it cools. A 1/16" drill fits through the columns vertically as it should.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-141214152937.jpeg)

The line shaft bearings were cast at Shapeways in gun metal and the first set is fitted to a box in the photo. It would have been simpler if I had a inside and outside bearing printed. They are both outside bearings so I have to file the 450 angle to fit the box. On the good side the rest fit nice with just a bit of fitting with small files.

I added new flasks to my casting system so I can cast every day now with out having to use the flasks in the oven. They wanted $10 plus shipping for a 2.5" SS flask 3" long. I just bought some 2.5" SS muffler tube from ebay 5' cost me $33 with free shipping. I need a new band saw blade now... I had to finish the job with a pipe cutter.

Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 28, 2015, 09:57:21 PM
The series I wrote about Shays in Steam in the Garden included S/N 1823. This a 3' Shay built to the same plan as the Mapleton with a very unique feature. It had the first Shay cast steel truck built. I drew this loco knowing that the rest of this size of early cast steel trucks went to Japan. I was trying to get Kozo interested in making one. That did not work but I did get a friend of his Shin段chiro Ukitsu interested in building a Shay with the drawings.

Here is my drawing of the first cast steel trucks.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215134441.jpeg)

The rest of the photos are of Shin段chiro Ukitsu's work.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131709-56062162.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131712-56562459.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131714-56572080.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131719-56592223.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131716-56581879.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131721-56601072.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131723-5661612.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131726-56622203.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131728-56631562.jpeg)

The scale of this build is 1:24 and the threads used are homade using 1.5mm brass hex for the bolts and nuts and either 1mm or 1.2mm threads where more strength is needed. It will not be live steam but the work is simply gorgeous.

More to come,
 :cheers: Dan
 
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 28, 2015, 09:58:49 PM
More photos of Shin段chiro Ukitsu's work.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131731-56641527.jpeg)

Check the detail on the top edge of the link...just like the drawing.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131733-56651388.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131736-56662215.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131739-56672359.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131742-56681286.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131744-56692336.jpeg)

The last photo made me very happy to see my drawing in metal and so beautifully  done.

Still a bit more to come.

 :DrinkPint: Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 28, 2015, 09:59:55 PM
Here is more work on the frame by Shin段chiro Ukitsu.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131746-56701291.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131748-56711397.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131945-5672178.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131948-56731613.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131952-56742063.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131955-56751545.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215131957-56761705.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215132000-56771057.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-280215132003-5678612.jpeg)

The last photo is all the work to date very nice work indeed.

 :cheers: Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: fumopuc on March 01, 2015, 04:51:57 AM
Hi Dan, it is really impressive what this Japanese guy is doing there.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Jo on March 01, 2015, 07:41:54 AM
8) Yes, his work is very impressive.

Jo
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 01, 2015, 07:47:44 PM
I got another email this morning from Kozo that has photos of  Shin段chiro痴 tools for machining small hex head screws. I have been thinking about square head bolts now I see how to make the tooling. Here are the photos and descriptions to make screws using 1.5mm hex stock.

The tool for machining outside diameter of the screw.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102314-5681801.jpeg)

The rear view of the tool with the work-holding-bearing detached.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102320-56831971.jpeg)

The rear view of the tool with the work-holding-bearing installed. The work will be supported with a bushing having a hole which is close running fit over the work.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102328-5684818.jpeg)

The tool for parting off the screw.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102336-56851972.jpeg)

The rear view of the parting tool.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102343-5686123.jpeg)

Close up of the parting tool with the tool bit retracted.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102351-5687882.jpeg)

Close up of the parting tool with the tool bit advanced to cut-off position.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102400-5688372.jpeg)

The parting tool and the outside-diameter-machining tool, both installed on the turret head. The turret head also was made by Shin段chiro himself.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102406-56891559.jpeg)

The outside diameter of screw is being machined. (1)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102413-56901605.jpeg)

The outside diameter of screw is being machined. (2)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102420-56911919.jpeg)

The screw is being parted off.(1)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102428-56921491.jpeg)

The screw is being parted off.(2)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102435-5693480.jpeg)

The screw is being parted off.(3)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102439-56941450.jpeg)

The thread is being cut with a screw cutting die. The work is being revolved with a homemade socket wrench.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102444-5695370.jpeg)

The hexagonal head is being chamfered with a conical cutter.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102448-56961868.jpeg)

The machined small hex-head screws.
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-010315102453-56972034.jpeg)

"The key-point for designing the tools is to keep 都hortest stress-path to machine such a small work with high accuracy. If it were long, the work could not even be machined due to its flexibility.
I hope you will enjoy these photos.
Kozo"

Many thanks to Shin段chiro for showing his methods for making the very tiny hex head screws, and thanks to Kozo for bridging the communication gap.

 :cheers: Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Steamer5 on March 02, 2015, 01:22:24 AM
Hi Dan,
 This thread just gets better & better ! Just need better eyes to see those
tiny bolts!!
Keep up your amazing work, & forwarding the updates from Japan

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Roger B on March 05, 2015, 08:13:03 PM
Shin段chiro Ukitsu's work is amazing  :praise2:  :praise2: Thank you for posting it  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on November 02, 2015, 06:20:26 PM
Several months back I heard that there was a plan to dedicate a Centenary plaque to the Mapleton Tramway in a park in Mapleton. I was asked if my drawing could be used for a 6' stainless steel laser engraved sign. I of course was excited and said yes to the project.

The celebration took place over the weekend and I received some photos of the plaque. The big cut out version is on the back of a stone bench which faces the smaller version with a bit of history.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-021115055047.jpeg)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-021115055215.jpeg)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-021115055302.jpeg)

The words:

"For 30 Years from 1915, two almost identical Shay locomotives called Dulong
and Mapleton ran on a two foot tramway track between Nambour and Mapleton.
The tramway ran down the Lilyponds Park entrance and across to
Obi Obi Road.

The 10.5 mile (17 kilometer) tramway plus the two Shay locomotives and all
rolling stock were owned by the Maroochy Shire Council. The line was never
financially viable and was subsidized by the rate payers.

Several thousand Shay locomotives of various sizes were designed and built by
the Lima Locomotive Company of Ohio on the United States from 1879 to 1944.
The Shay locomotives were quite unlike conventional steam locomotives as they
had two vertical cylinders and two four-wheeled bogies. While the local Shay
locomotives were heavy coal users, slow and needed a lot of maintenance, they
were particularly suited for steep winding tracks."

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-021115081246.jpeg)

"The locomotives were used to haul sugar cane, milled timber and logs, small
livestock, cream, fruit, general goods and passengers. Heavier loads could be
carried on the down run to Nambour.

The service operated Monday to Saturday, leaving Mapleton in the morning.
branch lines meant that the locomotives could shunt up to the Mapleton
shops/tavern and the sawmill. Because there was no turntable, the locomotive
made the trips to and from Nambour facing Mapleton.

After the closure of the Mapleton Tramline in 1944, the Moreton Sugar Mill
purchased the locomotives, rolling stock and track. In 1948 the sugar mill built
one locomotive using the parts from Dulong and Mapleton with the rebuilt locomotive
being named Shay. The Shay worked at the Moreton Mill until 1965.

The preserved Shay locomotive can now be seen at the Nambour and District
Historical Museum."

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: b.lindsey on November 02, 2015, 06:33:30 PM
That is great Dan and it's nice you had a part in it too!!  Thanks for posting the pictures of the event.

Bill
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 16, 2017, 07:58:21 PM
This project is not dead just slow. I drew Shay gear #6 in 3D cad and sent the file to a friend that is building an early Shay in 16mm scale who has a printer. The pinions are small so they were printed with a material that could be burnt out so they came out fine. The 7/8 gears could not be done the same way so a mold was made. The gears made with the mold looked good, but there was no way to get the gear face and the rim to both run true. Oh well off to the remelt pile.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217105606.jpeg)

Two of the gears were printed by another guy as a test. They did not look as good as the print lines can be seen but they were a direct burnout and I had already made a special expanding mandrel so I gave them a go on the lathe.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217105833.jpeg)

I chucked the back flange in the 4 jaw chuck and the flange and gear face ran true. You can see the indicator in the tailstock behind the lathe. I took a light cut to true up the inner bore.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110139.jpeg)

I modified an expanding mandrel with a hex bolt so that it can be taken up blind. The expanding screw was originally simply tapped into the mandrel body and there was no way to tighten it blind.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110259.jpeg)

The mandrel with gear ready to go in the lathe.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110448.jpeg)

Ready to face the back flange.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110617.jpeg)

Finished back flange.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110811.jpeg)

The pinion was a simple job to drill and ream 5/32".

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-161217110915.jpeg)

The pinion was mounted in the tool block with a 5/32" drill and the gears ran under power just fine.   :cartwheel: :cartwheel: :cartwheel:

Now I have a proper set of #6 Shay gears.... time to finish the trucks.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on December 16, 2017, 08:00:44 PM
Very nicely done, glad to see this one active again!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 16, 2017, 11:46:49 PM
Chris, did you take a good look at the lathe? The 4 jaw chuck is a Sherline and the lathe is  Levin with a 3C headstock and a 10mm collet tailstock. I have several other goodies like a 3C collet closer and a production cross slide to do repetitive work. The tool block is the small Aaa Multifix
https://www.ebay.com/itm/worldwide-smallest-Quick-Change-Tool-Post-system-Multifix-QCTP-size-Aaa

The expandable mandrels I am using came from this ebay store:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/thirdwheelrider/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

He also sells the screws so you can make your own. The 8 piece set has free shipping in the US so it is a good deal.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on December 16, 2017, 11:54:11 PM
Chris, did you take a good look at the lathe? The 4 jaw chuck is a Sherline and the lathe is  Levin with a 3C headstock and a 10mm collet tailstock. I have several other goodies like a 3C collet closer and a production cross slide to do repetitive work. The tool block is the small Aaa Multifix
https://www.ebay.com/itm/worldwide-smallest-Quick-Change-Tool-Post-system-Multifix-QCTP-size-Aaa (https://www.ebay.com/itm/worldwide-smallest-Quick-Change-Tool-Post-system-Multifix-QCTP-size-Aaa)

The expandable mandrels I am using came from this ebay store:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/thirdwheelrider/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from= (https://www.ebay.com/sch/thirdwheelrider/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=)

He also sells the screws so you can make your own. The 8 piece set has free shipping in the US so it is a good deal.

Cheers Dan
Neat setup - I had not noticed that the chuck was a Sherline. How do you like that Levin lathe?
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: b.lindsey on December 17, 2017, 12:09:46 AM
Very nice to see more on this project Dan. Handsome looking Levin as well.

Bill
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 20, 2017, 11:05:34 PM
How do you like that Levin lathe?

I like it a whole lot anyone need an older Cowells ME 90 with attachments?

I ordered a sheet of nickel silver to make new rims if needed. I hate to melt the gears if they can be used.

Here is the lathe with one of gears that were directly burned out. There were a few more that just got to me today.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-201217144055.jpeg)

I set up the 5C indexer vertical in the mill and drilled a wheel center and the gear flange.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-201217144212.jpeg)

Here is the first one bolted up. Notice the gear rim diameter is just a tiny bit shy of the wheel center diameter. The metal shrink made it too small. The new prints will have extra metal so the rim can be machined to the proper size.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-201217144344.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 22, 2017, 10:33:29 PM
I am using 1.5" schedule 160 SS pipe for the tires here is the setup to face the ends before using the band saw to cut blanks.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-221217141658.jpeg)

The rest of the gears are bolted to wheel centers and the left side centers are with the tire blanks.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-221217141851.jpeg)

Now to face the tires.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-221217142006.jpeg)

I am waiting on an expanding mandrel to profile the tires.

Tomorrow I will make the half brass bearings.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 24, 2017, 11:06:48 PM
The first step in making the half brass wheel bearings was to drill a 3/16" hole in a section of 5/16" square brass stock. These sections were milled with a 3/16" rod inserted to keep the vise pressure from distorting the section when it gets thin.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-241217145433.jpeg)

The bearings installed in the left and right side pedestals, notice the left one is in a bit deep this is because the thrust pad has not been made yet.
the thrust pad is the next item on the list.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-241217145551.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 26, 2017, 07:48:16 PM
The thrust pad is a 2.25" square section 1/16" thick with one half round side. It is small so I made a clamp with file buttons to make the round bottom side. One thrust pad is shown finished in the photo and another finished one is in the filing fixture.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-261217113026.jpeg)

The wheel axle rides on the thrust pas on the left side and the adjusting bolt will actually work to take up wear. This photo shows the cover removed and the thrust pad installed.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-261217113151.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 30, 2017, 06:23:47 PM
The tires were bored to the finished diameter on the Levin lathe then the new mandrel was turned to that diameter on the South Bend.

Now to have fun with the profile tool....  I rough cut the tread half the width first to reduce the load on the tool. I set the carriage depth stop to use for the second half of the wheel tread.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217100626.jpeg)

Then finished cut for the tread.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217100741.jpeg)


The final operation was to cut the back flange radius.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217100846.jpeg)

There was a small amount of chatter with a South Bend Heavy 10 lathe. It only took a bit of polishing to remove it. I do not think I could have used the profile tool with a light hobby lathe.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on December 30, 2017, 06:31:29 PM
Tires are looking good!

 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on December 30, 2017, 10:50:02 PM
Thanks, Chris they did come out a lot better than the last ones I did.

Here is the truck assembly fixture. The wheel bearing pockets are square so I cut a section of steel to just fit. The steel bars are on the far right next to the base which has set screws in the ends to hold the bearing pocket bar. Two smaller bars clamp the backs of the bearing pedestals with set screws in the top plate.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217143314.jpeg)

Here is the whole fixture assembled with all four bearing pedestals clamped in place.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217143404.jpeg)

The fixture will have several functions the first one is to true up the top and bottom mounting surfaces. I put a full sheet of emery cloth on the surface plate and leveled the top and bottoms of the pedestals.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-301217143512.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 04, 2018, 10:21:12 PM
I had to move the Levin to the house as it was just too cold in the shop to work. I decided to make the lineshaft collars and split thrust bearings. The rear shaft is a bit different and has thrust collars on both right pedestals. The very end collar is different and has a tiny taper key. I will model that latter.

I cut down a section of SS to 13/32 and machined the back side of the collars.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-040118134533.jpeg)

Using a piece of the 13/32 stock I made a mandrel to turn the thrust washers. They are split so they can be replaced by removing the lineshaft. There is no way to get two from a single section so I made extra.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-040118134642.jpeg)

I had to leave a longer chucking section on the collars that hold the split bearings so I could bore the recess.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-040118140454.jpeg)

I bought extra screws for the expanding mandrels I have so I could make them without waiting for a new one to get to me. The smallest screw is a 2-56 Allen head cap screw with a 10 degree taper. Here is a tapered mill cutting the mandrel after it has been tapped 2-56.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-040118134746.jpeg)

The homemade mandrel worked great to cut off the chucking piece off. Here are both mandrels with the finished parts.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-040118134941.jpeg)

Cheers Dan

Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 05, 2018, 01:27:35 AM
Nice!

 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steam guy willy on January 05, 2018, 02:12:26 AM
Hi Chris, shouldn't that be  'In model engineers we trust"  ....!!Amazing work going on here Dan  really cool....
Willy
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 05, 2018, 09:37:29 PM
Hi, Willy if I ever make up a giant coin I will have to use that line to see if anyone notices.

I made up a spare bottom bar to be used as a drill template. I drilled through both center holes for the bottom bolster and made a center hole for the pedestals.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050118130206.jpeg)

I have some small 0-80 thumb screws that work very well for temporary assembly.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050118130311.jpeg)

Both bottom bars attached with thumb screws.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050118130426.jpeg)

Here is the arch bar bender set to bend the arch bar.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050118130547.jpeg)

The arch bar bender set to make the inverted arch bar,

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050118130641.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 05, 2018, 10:09:40 PM
Those thumbscrews are a great idea.


How does that bender work?
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 05, 2018, 10:32:31 PM
Hi Chris, the little hole in the bar goes on one of the pins and the bigger pin with the brass knob forces the stock to bend around the pin. The brass knob was a drop piece from another project just laying around on the workbench.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 05, 2018, 11:21:09 PM
Hi Chris, the little hole in the bar goes on one of the pins and the bigger pin with the brass knob forces the stock to bend around the pin. The brass knob was a drop piece from another project just laying around on the workbench.

Cheers Dan

Slick!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamboatmodel on January 06, 2018, 06:54:54 PM
Hi Chris, shouldn't that be  'In model engineers we trust"  ....!!Amazing work going on here Dan  really cool....
Willy
Centuries' back while bored on a night shift I found some ink that matched the printing on an American $5 bill, I used calligraphy pens and added "All others Pay Cash" under  In God we Trust. It matched the style of the printing exactly and you had to use a magnifying glass to tell I had done it. I pinned it up on the wall and forgot about it. Being in Canada at that time you did not see much America bills, when I got back into work a couple of days latter the Boss called me into his office. One of the other employees who was not too swift had refused American money from customers because there bill did not have "All others Pay Cash" under  In God we Trust.
Gerald.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 06, 2018, 08:08:10 PM
Hi Chris, shouldn't that be  'In model engineers we trust"  ....!!Amazing work going on here Dan  really cool....
Willy
Centuries' back while bored on a night shift I found some ink that matched the printing on an American $5 bill, I used calligraphy pens and added "All others Pay Cash" under  In God we Trust. It matched the style of the printing exactly and you had to use a magnifying glass to tell I had done it. I pinned it up on the wall and forgot about it. Being in Canada at that time you did not see much America bills, when I got back into work a couple of days latter the Boss called me into his office. One of the other employees who was not too swift had refused American money from customers because there bill did not have "All others Pay Cash" under  In God we Trust.
Gerald.

 :ROFL: :lolb:
Priceless!


There is one of the auto repair places near me that changed to new owners this past year. I went in for a boat trailer inspection, and was surprised to see that they no longer ACCEPT cash, only checks and credit cards! First time I hit that one anywhere. Maybe they don't trust their employees with cash, just our credit card numbers!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 08, 2018, 12:34:04 AM
Good story Gerald. I had a machine shop just outside the control room on one of the ships I had to stand boring watches, so I would just make stuff for something to do.

It took a bit of adjusting to make the arch bar assembly lie flat in both planes. I made a drilling fixture to drill the center holes for the tie rods. It is a thumb screw clamp the width of the wood bolsters. Drilling the arch bar.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070118161344.jpeg)

Drilling the inverted arch bar.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070118161441.jpeg)

I made a similar clamp to drill the holes for the pedestals. The whole assembly is drilled at once with the tap drill for 0-80. I will explain why I used the tap drill tomorrow with photos.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070118161630.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 08, 2018, 08:52:00 PM
The reason I used the tap drill is I wanted to tap the inverted arch bar so I could use a screw as a clamp to hold the arch bars together when drilling the holes in the top of the pedestals. Much smaller than any clamp I have. I had some small flat head screws just the right length.

I have drilled the first side and put in a bolt ready to drill the second side.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-080118123649.jpeg)

Now just remove the flat head screws and drill the other two holes.

Here both sides are done. I still have to trim back the arch bars to match the inverted bar.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-080118123733.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: 10KPete on January 08, 2018, 08:56:52 PM
Lovely work, Dan! I'm following your work and eagerly await the next installment. :popcorn:

Pete
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 08, 2018, 09:41:58 PM
Looking great!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 09, 2018, 10:06:31 PM
Thanks, Pete and Chris for stopping by.

The last step for the truck frame assembly fixture is to ream the line shaft bearings. I found a nifty machine that came from the EDM industry. It is a horizontal drilling machine. It only has a 1/8" keyless chuck which is the same chuck as on my small Servo drill press. I found a set of collets threaded 1/4-28 and cut down an adaptor for the chuck so I could use a 5/32" reamer for the line shaft bearings.

Here is the setup.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090118134304.jpeg)

Here is the whole machine. The tag reads Westhoff Machine Co. St Louis MO.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090118134358.jpeg)

The standard length of a 5/32" reamer is only 4" that was only long enough to start the reamer in the second bearing. To get more travel I removed the right pedestal. I was still a bit short the point of the reamer was just poking out.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090118134452.jpeg)

I finished the job by removing the pedestal and using the drill press.

The frame assembly fixture has finished its work until the next set of side frames.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090118134552.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on January 09, 2018, 10:57:17 PM
That's quite a machine!


 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 10, 2018, 03:34:47 PM
That's quite a machine!

Chris,
Yes I drill a lot of small holes two jobs on this Shay build come to mind drilling the frames and drilling the steam cylinder. I did them with the Servo drill press but the work was not very securely held and that can lead to more in the scrap bin.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090118134358.jpeg)
Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamboatmodel on January 10, 2018, 03:57:47 PM
Hi Dan,
I can see lead screws for the Y & Z axes, but do not see any for the X? Does the spindle with the horizontal motor move?  It almost looks like you could do milling on it. I looked up the company but did not see any machinery on there.
Gerald.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 10, 2018, 04:07:53 PM
Gerald, the table is on round linear bearings and you simply push it into the drill bit. There is a mount in front for a dial indicator and a rod on the table that is adjustable that engages the dial point. The back rail has two stops to limit the table travel.

Here is a link to the specs:
https://www.westhoffinc.com/files/2012/09/MicroFlush.pdf?x21635

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: steamboatmodel on January 11, 2018, 03:09:48 PM
Thanks Dan,
That is one very interesting machine.
Gerald.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 12, 2018, 09:31:32 PM
Progress on the wheel sets. I just have to trim the length and diameter of the bearing fits. I just had to see a trial assembly.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-120118132416.jpeg)

I will be packing up my mobile shop tomorrow for the trip to the International G1 Steamup at Diamondhead MS.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Kim on January 12, 2018, 10:57:37 PM
Dan,
That just looks really cool!
So, I'm sure it's back in your thread somewhere, but did you make all those castings?  They look really great!
Kim
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on January 12, 2018, 11:31:07 PM
Kim, I did all the castings except for the gears and the line shaft bearings. I only cast silicon bronze which is a bit hard for a bearing so I used Shapeways for the line shaft bearings. The gears were cast from a part made with a 3D printer. I would have used Shapeways but they do not cast a white bronze which I think looks better,

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 10, 2018, 12:29:08 AM
The half brass stock I made was a tad too narrow. I should have measured the stock as it was undersized.

I made some new half brass stock that fits the pocket correctly. The thickness of the brasses is .126" on the print so I used 1/8" tool steel for a file guide to get the thickness correct.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090218160947.jpeg)

I made a mandrel from a section of 1/4" square stock so I could cut the sections to length. The width of the bearings is .225" so with the 2 of the jaws are gripping the steel mandrel and the other two clamp a set of half brass bearings. Simply undo the brass jaws for the next set of half brass bearings.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090218161106.jpeg)

The final step is to use a small center drill to drill and chamfer the oil hole.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-090218161202.jpeg)

I cut down the right side of one of the axles and the gears will mesh fine. I have to cut down the thrust collars on the lineshaft as they are a bit oversize and hit the inside edge of the gear teeth.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Steamer5 on February 10, 2018, 01:43:31 AM
Hi Dan,
 Coming on very nicely!

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Zephyrin on February 10, 2018, 07:54:59 AM
Very nice frame for your loco.
Shop made lost wax castings too, wow, amazing work is going on this thread, thanks to share !
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 16, 2018, 11:59:02 PM
Thanks guys for stopping by. It took me way longer than I expected to fit the lineshaft. The collars had to be reduced several times to get it right. I made them to the drawing size and they were still too large. I dropped several half bearings doing trial assemblies until I realized it is simpler to flip the truck upside down. Only one was lost to the shop elves.

I made up yet another 5/32 expanding mandrel, this time I used a 1-72 Allen head cap screw with a 100 taper for the expanding screw. The 2-56 one did not leave enough metal. Here is the chucking piece on the pinions being cut back.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160218152600.jpeg)

Once I had the lineshaft fitted and the gears meshing cutting the left side of the axle was a simple job. It is starting to take shape.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160218152658.jpeg)

The bottom cross bars had to be filed because they were cast for 1/16 x 1/4 stock with a round edge but the bottom bars were laser cut 2mm by 1/4. I make them long and in 2 pieces because getting something long and skinny to cast to the correct length has never worked for me. It is simpler to fit them and silver solder the joint.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160218152748.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on February 17, 2018, 01:33:25 AM
Looking great! Those line shafts need a lot of parts to fit very closely, great job!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Roger B on February 17, 2018, 07:40:21 AM
Excellent  :praise2: That's a lot of bits to keep in alignment  ::)
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 19, 2018, 09:31:09 PM
It was good to get the gears to work as they have been the weak link on every other Shay truck I have built. Now on to the brake rigging. I already had the steel I beams made up by using a gear cutter for a rack. The brake heads are riveted to the beams and the fulcrum is bolted with 1.2mm U bolts and nuts.

I will make the brake hangers tomorrow.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-190218130119.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 19, 2018, 11:18:39 PM
The pics in 132 are awesome.
I try to follow as best I can...sure is enjoyable.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 19, 2018, 11:35:07 PM
Thanks Zee, this might be helpful the 1907 Repair Parts Catalog has a detail shot of the very same truck I am building.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160913181504.jpeg)
(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/5/213-160913181615.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on February 19, 2018, 11:39:30 PM
I love the old catalogs like that, amazing information about parts and uses. Is that one available online or did you luck into a paper copy?
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 19, 2018, 11:49:50 PM
Chris,
There is a reprint of the catalog done by Cass and it is what I started with but I found an original copy a few years back and it is a real treasure. I made my first trucks with the photos. I now have almost all the drawings for this build. I printed all the drawings in "Steam in the Garden" a few years back. They were for the most part printed at 7/8 scale with full size dimensions so they could be used for building in any scale.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 20, 2018, 10:37:43 PM
The rod section of the brake hanger is .073" brass. I could have threaded it 1-72 but I went with Locktite instead. Here is the drilling fixture to cross drill the rod ends.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-200218140944.jpeg)

I drilled a small piece of brass for the gluing fixture. The other one has a 5/64" steel rivet attaching it to a brake head.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-200218141051.jpeg)

Now for the trial assembly of the brake hangers.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-200218141150.jpeg)

The right side is missing the brake shoe. I should be getting new blades for my mini table saw so I can make the wood bolsters to attach the brake levers.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Admiral_dk on February 21, 2018, 07:46:26 PM
Fantastic project - I like it a lot even though there's no chance that I will build one myself.

I seem to remember that what you call a Truck is called a Boogie here in Europe - or am I completely mistaken  :noidea:

You have a lot of details and minor items on this build  :praise2:

Best wishes

Per
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on February 21, 2018, 09:08:15 PM
Fantastic project - I like it a lot even though there's no chance that I will build one myself.

I seem to remember that what you call a Truck is called a Boogie here in Europe - or am I completely mistaken  :noidea:

You have a lot of details and minor items on this build  :praise2:

Best wishes

Per
I thought it was a Bogie on the train, that a Boogie was what dripped off your nose...  :Lol:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 22, 2018, 01:37:17 AM
Chris, I thought a boogie was a dance... I really hope my Shay does not start dancing down the track.

Per yes we call a bogie a truck on this side of the pond.

I have to do the brake hangers again I was not looking at the detail drawing. I used the assembly drawing which I did not update after I found the detail part.

I made a brake shoe key today photos tomorrow.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Admiral_dk on February 22, 2018, 12:04:31 PM
Thank you for the answer Dan.

Chris - I work in the music buisnes (and play too), so .... I like to Boogie, I like to Bogie ...  :noidea: ... Ups .... but I'm dyslexic so that happens from time to time - at least somebody got a good giggle.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 22, 2018, 10:44:40 PM
The brake hangers have to be remade because I made the diameter of the ends to large and there is no room for the brake shoe key.

The key is a thin strip of metal shaped like a T. As this is a very small detail and it is too small for the milling machine, so I used two 5/8" lathe bits as a file guide. The photo shows setting up the guide upside down on two strips of brass the thickness of the metal to be removed. There are vertical strips of the key stock on the outside edge of the clamps to keep the tool bits parallel.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-220218142347.jpeg)

Here is the other side with finished keys and keys installed in the brake heads. An unfinished key is clamped ready for filling.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-220218142450.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on February 25, 2018, 12:04:28 AM
The metal I made the brake shoe keys from is a recycled 1 pound propane tank. This is a really nice material to work with as it is very malleable and can be worked cold without any cracking. It is 0.024" thick which makes it a but over 5/16" in 7/8" scale.

The key was tapered on a chunk of round stock found on the bench. I wrapped it around the and held it with a C clamp so I had room for the file.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-240218154417.jpeg)

I was having trouble cleaning out the slots for the key as I only have one or two files that tiny. Then I got the idea to cut 1/16" strips of 180 grit emery cloth and threading in in the slot. That worked like a champ.

Here are all the brakes for 2 trucks. It is simpler to fit the shoe before the brake head is riveted to the beam.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-240218154510.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 06, 2018, 11:21:44 PM
I used finish nails for the rod section of the new brake hangers and silver soldered the ends on. I used a ceramic brick with 2mm square holes to hold the parts for solder.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-060318144617.jpeg)

I was not really happy with the first set of rivets holding the brake heads to the beams so a made a custom bucker block and switched to copper rivets as they form better in difficult locations.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-060318144707.jpeg)

I also made a set of rivet dies for a General automatic center punch. The dies are simpler to make than the ones I was making for the Starret punch and the dies can be changed without taking the punch apart.

I found some 22 ga. half round SS wire so I decided to make my own cotter pins. 22 ga. is 0.64mm which is smaller than 1/32" cotter pins which is the smallest I could find.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-060318145008.jpeg)

Here is the assembly ready to install. I have three more parts to make the piece with 4 holes is the start of a drill guide for the brake stop rod.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-060318145110.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on March 07, 2018, 02:15:40 PM
Great looking parts. Clever backing iron for the rivets too!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 08, 2018, 12:29:52 AM
Thanks Chris, I made a bunch of custom bucking bars for the frame but that one will be easy to remember what it was made for.

The first part up today was the brake stop rod. It is really more of a strap but that is what the repair parts book calls it. Here is the first side being drilled with the drill guide.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070318154057.jpeg)

Then the other side is folded around the drill guide and the second side is drilled.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070318154152.jpeg)

The last step is to attach the file guides and round the edge of the brake stop rod.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070318154525.jpeg)

The next part is the bracket that attaches the brake stop rod to the top truck bolster. It is folded from 20 ga steel sheet. Here it is finished and the brake stop rod installed. One of the other three holes will be attached to the short brake lever. The extra holes are to take up brake shoe wear. The long brake lever is attached to the frame brake rigging.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-070318154716.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 08, 2018, 10:29:48 PM
The only thing left on the truck brake assembly is the stop collars for the brake rods which is a simple lathe job.

The part for today is the chafe plate for the ends of the top bolster. The real ones are cast iron so I went with 20 ga steel. I made a former die from 3/32" steel the size of the wood bolster end. The first one I made I silver soldered the corners which worked but made everything black that had to be cleaned for the other two corners. A simpler method was to miter the corners to fit much better with a square file.

Here are the steps to make a chafe plate and one sitting on a bolster guide to check the fit.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-080318134655.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Steamer5 on March 13, 2018, 06:46:32 AM
Looking good Dan.
On the silver solder front, on another forum, one of the guys covers the part with flux, he gets little to no blackening. What little he does get comes off pretty easy by all accounts. He also uses as little solder as he thinks he can get away with.

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 15, 2018, 10:01:40 PM
Thanks for the tip Kerrin I will keep it in mind for future use.

I had to remake the chafe plates as somehow I got the drawing wrong and they had to be made shorter. After scraping the first top bolster I decided that I needed a simple fixture to clamp the side frames in place of the bottom tie bars. I took a section of 3/16" keystock and cut it to length and cut shoulders for the bottom bars. A section of flat stock was drilled and tapped for the clamp. Here is the finished assembly.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318140906.jpeg)

I then made a steel guide for the section of the bolsters between the spring plates. The milling machine is not really the best tool for working wood as it leaves a bur that can make layout lines very hard to see, so the guide marks the line. Here is the first side of the top bolster being machined for the spring plates.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141029.jpeg)

Two sections of steel were cut the same length of the spring plate. They butted up against the center guide and a safety edge file was used to cut the rabbit for the chafe plates. This photo shows the guides shifted 90 degrees to make the last two rabbits.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141148.jpeg)

I cut out the section of the bottom bolster that leaves room for the lineshaft then clamped it to the right side frame.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141727.jpeg)

Then I put that assembly in a vise to drill the bolt holes,

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318144641.jpeg)

I flipped the bolster guide upside down and used the top bolster to locate the hole for the center pin in the bottom bolster.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141833.jpeg)

Now I could add the center guide to cut the dado for the spring plate in the bottom bolster.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141610.jpeg)

Now time for a trial assembly. The springs are way too big but they were what was on the workbench. The center guide and its bottom plate can be seen next to the file guides.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-150318141934.jpeg)

Cheers Dan

Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on March 16, 2018, 01:27:59 AM
Gotta love jigs - almost always worth the little bit of effort.

 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 16, 2018, 09:28:59 PM
Yes, Chris, I agree if you have to make more than one jigs can be a real time saver.

Fitting the inside brake beams took a bit of work. I used a section of 5/16" keystock to make the beams and I figured it was close enough to a 4" beam which scales to 0.292". The brakes did not fit between the bottom bolster and the drivers. I had to remove stock on the brake shoes. I wound some coarse emery cloth on round stock the size of the driver and reduced the thickness of the brake shoe on an angle to match the drivers. It was slow work but quicker than making a whole new set of brake beams. I will be making some true scale 4" beam for the next truck.

Here are the results:

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160318140714.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160318140823.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-160318140920.jpeg)

The orange bits are foam earplugs acting as tempory springs

Next up the top cross bars and diagonal bars.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 27, 2018, 11:53:03 PM
I decided to try my hand at making the square head bolts and the socket washers to hold the center plate to the top bolster I had been wanting to make some square bolts for a while and when I worked out how to make the socket washers even though they can not be seen in the finished model I had to give it a go.

The square bolt size is 1.2mm and 1/2" long with a 2mm square head. I did not have any 2mm square stock so I made up some from 2mm stock. I used the die filler to cut strips a little oversize then I used the mill to cut that to size. I have homemade step jaws for my vise step jaws. The brass strip holding the stock is 1/16" thick.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143051.jpeg)

There is no way with a single point tool to cut the whole shank of the bolt at once the first cut was 3/16" and I threaded that section.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143216.jpeg)

This was the first real use of the production slide for my lathe. The close handle is the compound feed which is set straight and the stop is set to just keep the tool from hitting the chuck jaws. The back handle is the crossfeed and the stop screw is set to cut to 1.2mm. You just have to bump the crossfeed in and take the cut. If you get gready or make the cut too fast snap there goes another bolt. It is annoying to start over but I have had chips larger that that flying off a lathe. Here is the second 3/16" cut.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143329.jpeg)

And the final cut to make the 1/2" length.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143522.jpeg)

Here is a bunch of unfinished bolts. The first bunch I cut off with a mini chop saw but that was the hard way as the heads were not cut to length.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143657.jpeg)

I reset the compound stop so I could use the tool edge as a work stop and use the back cutoff tool.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318143829.jpeg)

Now switching to a collet the cutoff tool is set to cut off the tiny nub left and the other tool is set to chamfer the square head.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318144053.jpeg)

Now on to the socket washer. The real ones are a cast iron socket for hex nuts with two splines to keep them from spinning in a wood hole. I used a Bell System tool to smash splines on a 4mm brass rod.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318144302.jpeg)

Then this was drilled and cutoff.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318144409.jpeg)

I drilled a hole in a wood block to hold the socket washer to file off the nub and then tap the hole.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318144542.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-270318144636.jpeg)

I will finish the top bolster tomorrow.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 28, 2018, 11:23:24 PM
The top bolster is almost done I only have to install the side bearing blocks. I want to make sure they match the frame one rides on the frame and the other on a plate riveted to the frame cross channels.

Here is a blurry shot of using a drill guide to drill the center plate.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-280318150737.jpeg)

Then I drilled the bolt holes through the bolster.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-280318150832.jpeg)

I made a steel section of the socket washer section so I could cut the splines in the wood before installing the socket washers.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-280318150910.jpeg)

Here is the installed center plate and the side bearing blocks ready to be installed the pins are pressed into the bottom of the block to prevent rotation.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-280318150953.jpeg)

The square nuts were worth the effort.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Steamer5 on March 29, 2018, 07:25:56 AM
Hi Dan,
 Great work looking good!

I agree the square nuts are worth it, even if you need eye balls on storks to be able to see them!

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 29, 2018, 01:53:03 PM
Hi Kerrin, yes those square heads will be hard to see and the ones holding the side bearings will not be seen at all when the truck is on the frame. It was still worth the effort to do it like the drawings and the closer you look the better the model looks.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on March 29, 2018, 10:17:40 PM
Top bolster finished the side bearing blocks line up with the frame pads just like they should.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-290318141332.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on March 31, 2018, 11:22:55 PM
Is the wood bolster the real part, or is that just a placeholder till the real one is made from metal?
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 01, 2018, 01:29:26 AM
Chris the real part was made from oak I used maple as it has a closer grain for a model where the end grain can be seen.

There is a spacer collar to hold the brake rods in the correct location. This is a small part with a small square set screw. I made the set screw from 1/16" steel keystock which is a bit overscale but the smallest size I can handle with a collet. Here are enough collars for both trucks.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-310318163533.jpeg)

While I had the brake assembly removed I drilled the holes for the bolster guides.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-310318164121.jpeg)

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-310318164246.jpeg)

Here are the new parts assembled.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-310318164416.jpeg)

Now for a group shot with the truck and frame.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-310318164513.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on April 01, 2018, 02:14:20 AM
Wow, never knew they were wood. Cool.


Looking great!
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 01, 2018, 02:24:53 AM
Chris, I am actually making two Shays S/N 2091 named Dulong and S/N 2800 named Mapleton. They were both built to the same plan with a few differences. The Mapleton had steel channels and plates for the truck bolsters and I might make it that way but the plan now is to make both with the early style truck with the wood bolsters. The existing Shay has the Mapleton frame and boiler with the Dulong trucks so that is my excuse.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 05, 2018, 11:28:56 PM
I finished the top and bottom crossbars and the diagonal bars. I used the tempory bottom bars as a silver soldering fixture for the bottom crossbars, here is the setup.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050418151335.jpeg)

There are a few finish details and then paint but the paint will wait until the second truck is finished.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-050418151450.jpeg)

I made a count of the parts to build one truck not counting nuts, bolts, washers, and pins, the total is 117 parts. I counted the gear guards which I do not plan to model as they were soon removed and not seen in any photo except for the builders photo.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 05, 2018, 11:36:39 PM
I wished I'd done a better job of keeping up with things. This is so cool.

What is the truck sitting on top of? It's a cool shot.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 05, 2018, 11:49:10 PM
Carl, there is still a lot more to build like the engine and boiler. The truck is on a model shop floor. The old shops had end grain wood blocks that were set in with tar and would turn black with time. I learned on a shop floor like that and have end grain 4x4 blocks in my shop floor, so I just had to make a model version.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 06, 2018, 09:14:30 PM
Here is the model floor on my shop floor. All the 4x4's were the center of the tree and I cut them so they are matched. There are several patterns or alien critters but the owl was too good to put in the floor so it sits on the window ledge. There is a scale yardstick across the tracks to show the gauge which is scale 2' and 4'. There were several 4' Shays.

(http://www.7-8ths.info/gallery/6/213-060418125855.jpeg)

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 06, 2018, 09:30:54 PM
That is just too cool.

I've never heard of doing a floor like that. What are the benefits?
How thick (deep) is each piece of your shop floor?
Did you make up the floor yourself?
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: crueby on April 06, 2018, 10:02:14 PM
Great look ror the model and shop. I haven't seen a floor like that since I toured the old Delco or Rochester Products auto parts factories. Incredibly durable, easy on dropped tools, but a terror in a fire after decades of absorbing oil, which is how those old buildings ended after sitting abandoned.
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: Dan Rowe on April 06, 2018, 11:02:01 PM
Carl, Yes I was on the crew that pored the concrete and framing crew for my shop. I did the floor with the help of my wife Alicia. She helped me sort the blocks and spot the patterns. The blocks in my floor are about 1.5" thick, but the old ones were much thicker. Chris already mentioned the main good and bad but it is also just cool to do it the old way.

Cheers Dan
Title: Re: Shay Locomotive
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 06, 2018, 11:13:51 PM
but it is also just cool to do it the old way.

 :ThumbsUp: