Model Engine Maker

Engines => From Kits/Castings => Topic started by: Dave Otto on January 19, 2013, 02:00:07 AM

Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 19, 2013, 02:00:07 AM
Hi everyone

I'm in the process of building the engine noted in the title; I have been posting updates on another model engine forum and at this time plan to continue.

I was wondering if there was interest for me to also post my build here? I'm not one to hit every forum on the net that may be a fit; but for some reason this one has lots of familiar names and I see some pretty cool projects in progress that I would like to be a part of.

So let me know; do I start at the beginning, where I'm at now, or?

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on January 19, 2013, 02:13:05 AM
I would certainly love to see your progress here. I've been amazed by what I've seen you posting in that "other" place, but don't go there very often. I think you'll be very well received here!

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: tvoght on January 19, 2013, 02:16:21 AM
Absolutely! Don't get over to the other place much anymore, and this build is one I've missed a lot.

--TIm
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 19, 2013, 02:19:41 AM
I am like Simon, dont visit the othet site much now, but am very interested in your project. Maybe you could bring us up to date  through pictures and then go from there. You are right though, lots of familiar faces here on MEM.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 19, 2013, 02:25:42 AM
Bring it on Dave.
As for what to start with (from the beginning or in progress), it's up to you.
It's a lot of work I know...but at least a couple of pics from the beginning would be appreciated.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on January 19, 2013, 04:39:57 AM
Have at it Dave!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 19, 2013, 04:45:43 AM
Dave I am also interested in see it here, I don't visit the old site any more either.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: rudydubya on January 19, 2013, 07:02:54 AM
Me too Dave.  Looking forward to it.

Regards,
Rudy
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on January 19, 2013, 09:05:40 AM
Hi Dave

Good to see you here also.  With the quality of the build and photos it would be a shame not to show it here also.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on January 19, 2013, 09:14:18 AM
Dave,

I am all for you starting at the beginning.

I don't go to a certain site much because they keep loosing my log in as I go page to page and consequently get constant adverts for funeral services.  :hellno:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 19, 2013, 09:33:31 PM
Hi Everyone

Thanks for the encouragement; I think I will go ahead and start from the beginning and play catchup for a while. I will see if I can get something going in the next day or so.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 20, 2013, 12:59:15 AM
Hello everyone,

First I want to say how much I have been enjoying everyone?s build threads and I know that I don?t comment on them and the updates nearly enough. There is really a lot of great work going on here.

So I thought I would start a thread on my current project; it is an 1890 Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison and Marvin castings. The engine was originally modeled by Lester Bowman who did a beautiful job making patterns and drawings. Lester made an engine for himself and there may have been some extra castings produced at that time but I don?t know for sure.

Roland Morrison took Lester?s (beautiful) original wood patterns and has been painstakingly using them as masters to create foundry proof match plate patterns from Dyanacast resin for a small run of castings.

The castings that I am using for my engine are from Morrison & Marvin?s new match plate patterns.

This is apt to be a long build because; well I have a real job, family and other things that take up my time. But I am committed and will do my best to keep on track.

I have a few parts made to date so for a while I will be playing catch-up. I started with machining the base (seemed logical) so that is where I will start this build.

Dave

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_1.jpg)
The base casting as received

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_3.jpg)
Indicated, shimmed and ready for the first cut.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_4.jpg)
Clean up cut of the top surface

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_6.jpg)
Flipped over and the bottom cleaned up

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_7.jpg)
Then a light skim cut with the Newfield flycutter for a nice finish

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_8.jpg)
Set up to drill the mounting holes

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_9.jpg)
Indicating the base prior to drilling the air intake hole pattern.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_10.jpg)
In the process of drilling.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_11.jpg)
Chips removed; Nice!

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Base_12.jpg)
Here is the finished base except for the body casting mounting holes and intake pipe hole which will be drilled and taped later; after the body is machined.

The Pacific engines have this unique and pleasing diamond shaped air intake hole pattern. The air intake pipe will be plumed into the base where the engine will pull its air from.

I guess some of the early engine manufactures felt the air in the confines of the base would be cleaner.

More to follow and thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 20, 2013, 01:16:34 AM
Very cool and interested in seeing more.

Newbie question: why machine the top and then the bottom? Could the bottom have been done and then the top?

Doing that hole pattern was very interesting. Had to be nerve wracking.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 20, 2013, 02:07:48 AM
Hi Zee

Well for starters I have slept since then; I have a hard remembering what I did yesterday. So to answer your question yes you probably could have done it the other way around. The vise was probably already on the mill so that is the direction I headed.

WRT the hole pattern; I need to let you know I have a CNC mill and also run one at my day job so in this build you will see the use of both. As I have said before in another place I thoroughly enjoy the whole process; 3D CAD, CAM and running the machine. I converted my mill at home close to 15 years ago and taught myself how to run it. that is one of the reasons I have the great job that I enjoy today.

This engine has been an amazing journey for me in many respects; I have met some great people, learned some new stuff and been able to make some contributions that may help others building this beautiful piece of early American History.

Thanks for your comments,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on January 20, 2013, 08:33:39 AM
Dave

It's going to be a pleasure watching this build here. :whoohoo:

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: sco on January 20, 2013, 08:40:37 AM
This looks a really interesting build with some cool tooling.  Good crisp photos too  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on January 20, 2013, 09:24:59 AM
Ditto, I'll be watching this one - nice looking castings and a great start  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 20, 2013, 11:50:01 PM
Hi Everyone

Thanks for all the kind words; I appreciate it.

I went back ad read my response to Zee and I really didn't like the attitude that it seemed to portray; I was trying to poke fun at my lousy memory and it seemed that I come across as being somewhat arrogant. Anyway this is not the way I wanted to sound (ever); I struggle putting my thoughts into words sometimes (most times), so I'll try to proof read my stuff a little better.

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 21, 2013, 12:11:19 AM
I started work on the cylinder next because the body casting hadn?t been received yet. Quite a bit of time was spent fettling (sp) before the machining was started.

I ended up flipping the cylinder end for end in the lathe a couple of times because I wanted to make sure I didn?t back my self into a corner. There was minimal material on the OD at the top above the exhaust valve boss and I wanted to be sure it was running as true as possible.

Considerable time was spent indicating to be sure every thing was going to work out ok.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_1.jpg)
Here the cylinder is set up and aligned in the 3 jaw chuck for the initial cuts.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_2.jpg)
A skim cut was taken in the bore to clean it up and also a cut on the OD of the flange so there would be something to indicate when the cylinder was flipped around.  Both of my 3 jaw and 6jaw chucks are set tru chucks; which makes them nice for this type of work.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_4.jpg)
The bottom end of the cylinder was roughed out and the cylinder flipped back around and chucked up on the newly machined skirt.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_5.jpg)
Now the bore is brought to with in .010? of final size.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_6.jpg)
Flipped around yet again (and indicated in) the register surface was cut under the cylinder flange. I don?t remember why I didn?t do this on the first set up; but I sure I had a good reason.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_8.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_9.jpg)
In the same setup the bosses for the water jacket cover were machined to size.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_10.jpg)
A final cut was taken in the 6 jaw chuck to bring the bore to the proper size for the shrink fit of liner.

I decided to drill and tap the water ports before the liner was installed so there would be plenty of space for the pipe tap. They are tapped 1/6? NPT which is also the same as 5/16-32 MTP.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_11.jpg)
Here is the cylinder set up in the mill to tap the water ports. The exhaust valve chest mounting boss had previously been milled. This is used as the angular datum for the bolt patterns and the other ports, water, intake, oil, and ignitor ports.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_12.jpg)
I didn?t take many pictures of the liner machining; here is an early shot drilling the cast iron bar stock.

The liner is a pretty straight forward turning job; however I did leave it a little long so I could face both ends after it was installed in the cylinder. About .005? was also left on each end of the cylinder for a finish pass after liner installation. This created an almost invisible joint.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_14.jpg)
With the liner now installed and bored (.003? was left for honing) the bolt patterns are being drilled. Notice the exhaust valve chest; mounting boss is positioned against the fixed jaw of the vise.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_16.jpg)
Now the cylinder is flipped over and indicated in to drill and tap the head stud circle. The two smaller holes are water passages; they intersect the water jacket space and will feed water to the head.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cylinder_17.jpg)
Here is the mostly finished cylinder. Left to do at this point is to finish the exhaust valve chest, mounting boss but I will wait until the valve chest is machined. The water jacket cover mounting holes need to be drilled and tapped and the ignitor holes finished.

Also completed at this point are the two oiler holes drilled and tapped ?-40 MTP and the intake port drilled and tapped 1/16? NPT

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 21, 2013, 01:11:42 AM
Those are some real nice finishes you're getting.
I hope I get there someday.

Learned a few things from your post too. Always glad for that.

P.S. I took your reply as having fun. So no problem.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 21, 2013, 01:14:53 AM
Thanks Zee,

That makes me feel better.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 21, 2013, 01:38:34 AM
Enjoying seeing your setups.   Nice work.  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on January 21, 2013, 02:27:38 AM
Yes great set ups and nice finish

Those castings are some of the nicest I've ever seen!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 21, 2013, 03:01:35 AM
Yea those are some nice setups. Great looking casting. They look like they have been bead blasted. Following with interest.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 21, 2013, 10:48:04 PM
Hi everyone thanks again for the kind words; you are correct, these are very nice castings. They machine beautifully with not a hard spot to be found.

I like to do as much fettling as I can before any machine work is done; this at least for me lessons the chance of damaging a newly machined surface. Because I plan to paint the engine when it is completed I have sand blasted all the castings to give everything a more uniform finish. For Iron castings I prefer to use garnet abrasive as opposed to glass beads for blasting media.

I also have a small blast cabinet in my home shop that I keep super fine glass bead in; it is my favorite for brass and bronze as you will see later on.

Thanks again,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 21, 2013, 11:19:42 PM
Hi Everyone

A beautiful set of lost wax cast bronze water jacket covers were included in the casting kit. These covers are cast-flat and need to be bent to fit the curvature of the bosses on the cylinder. I wanted to bend them before the holes were drilled because I was concerned the holes may cause problems in the bending operation.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_1.jpg)
The covers were milled to length plus .005? for a cleanup cut after they were bent.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_2.jpg)
Also at this time the mounting holes were spotted for future reference.

I made some quick and dirty tooling to bend the plates in the arbor press. The bronze is quite springy and needs to be over-bent due the spring-back. I guessed about 10% and hit it pretty close.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_3.jpg)
The press tool was made from a piece of Nylon that was in the scrap box and worked great. I did an initial bend without the pocket for the letters and it didn?t work to well so a pocket was cut to clear the letters and it worked much better.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_4.jpg)
Here is one of the covers after being bent with the relived press tool.
The aluminum mandrill also from the scrap box already had the shoulder on it which worked well to keep the cover square with the bend axis.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_5.jpg)
Another piece of tooling was made to hold the covers for machining. It was turned to the same diameter as the pads on the cylinder. I transferred the 5C chuck from the lathe to the spin-indexer in the mill without removing the mandrill to insure concentricity.
Not shown in the pictures is that the top and bottom center holes of the cover were drilled in the vise after they were bent.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_6.jpg)
The indexer was used to roll the cover to the left and then to the right rows of holes. The covers were clearance drilled and the mandrill drilled and tapped 2-56.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_7.jpg)
After the covers were secured to the mandrel with all the screws; the spin-dex was returned to zero and the profile milled using the CNC.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_8.jpg)
One of the finished covers before being removed from the mandrel.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_9.jpg)
Here are the beautiful little covers bent, drilled and ready to mount on the cylinder!

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_10.jpg)
An expanding mandrel was made to hold the cylinder for secondary machining operations which has worked out well. Here it is being used to drill and tap the 2-56 holes to mount the water jacket covers.
On the original engine these bosses were cored and open to the water jacket; but on the model there is no reason for this so the covers are just for looks.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_11.jpg)
The cover was manually positioned on the cylinder boss for the best possible alignment (it is a casting after all) and once the top center hole was located all the others were located from this datum.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_12.jpg)
After an enjoyable afternoon in the shop here are the fruits of my labor.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Water_Jacket_Cover_13.jpg)
And a profile shot.



Next up will be the construction of the crankshaft.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 21, 2013, 11:40:42 PM
Nice post!
Great attention to detail.
That's going to look great.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 24, 2013, 12:28:16 AM
Hi Everyone & thanks for the comments Zee I appreciate it,


I got a harebrained idea to make the crankshaft out of 1144 Stress-Proof thinking that it may stay a little straighter as the excess material was cut away. The smallest piece I could get that would work was 2 ?? dia. So a bunch of material needed to be removed.

After facing the stock to length in my lathe at home I took the blank to work so I could cut it down in my mill there. Flood coolant, a face mill and a 10 hp. Spindle motor made quick work of it.

Also while in the mill at work I drilled the centers and removed the excess material for the throw.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_1.jpg)
Cutting to length

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_3.jpg)
The Stress-Proof sure turns nice

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_4.jpg)
In my mill at work getting ready to make the round bar into a rectangle

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_5.jpg)
Pretty much to size; I left .050? on the thickness so I could finish it on my friends shaper later on.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_6.jpg)
Set up to drill the centers

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_7.jpg)
Action shot!

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_8.jpg)
And the finished centers

After the excess material was removed for the throw; I did have to straighten it a little. It had about .02? bow over the length; a little tweaking in the arbor press got it acceptable.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_9.jpg)
Here is the blank set up in the lathe to turn the throw. The wire near the end is hold the blank against a threaded stud which I?m using to drive the blank. The stud is screwed into a hole in the flange of the collet adaptor.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_12.jpg)
Action shot!

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_13.jpg)
Here it is with the throw pretty much finished. Besides the turning tool shown I also use small left and right hand insert tools to finish the inside faces of the cheeks


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_14.jpg)
Using the band saw to blank out the extra material; the Roll-In saw makes this part of the job a breeze.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_16.jpg)
Both sides have been cut and now it?s ready to go back in the lathe; it?s starting to look like a crankshaft now.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_17.jpg)
Set up between centers and turning the long end.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_19.jpg)
I ended up turning the shafts to fractional dimensions larger than the finished size so I could rough it out and use collets for holding the already turned ends. My original plan was to do the whole job between centers; but I was fighting chatter real bad and the collet solved this aggravating problem. Here it is flipped around and working on the short end

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_20.jpg)
Here is the set up in the mill to cut the key ways.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_21.jpg)
And a closer shot.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_22.jpg)
After the crank was finished I took it over to my friends shop and used his shaper to finish the cheeks to .750? thick. Remember that I had left them over size in anticipation of this. The shaper creates a finish that looks like it could have been ground. The shaper is also going to get a workout cutting the bearing pads on the body casting.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_23.jpg)
As I told my buddy; the bench centers allow you analyze or agonize over really small TIR numbers. Over all I?m very happy with the way the crank turned out.

Next up; starting work on the body casting.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 24, 2013, 01:29:01 AM
Great looking crank.   Love the details with the plates.  Way out of my league in equipment, skill and experience!   I will just sit back and enjoy the fact that somebody can do this.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on January 25, 2013, 12:18:33 AM
Alot to like here Dave.
What diameter is the flywheel on this engine?

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 25, 2013, 01:38:01 AM
Thanks for the kind words guys, I appreciate it.

Steve the single large flywheel on the Pacific is 11.437"

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 26, 2013, 02:10:14 AM
Hello everyone

I started Working on the body casting by spending about a half a day fettling the openings to the crankcase. Once I was satisfied with the hand work I was ready to start machining.

Sorry I didnít take any pictures of my initial set up; but it involved fixturing the casting right side up on some parallels and a little shimming to get everything plumb; then taking a light skim on the cylinder flange to just barely clean it up.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_001.jpg)
Then the casting was turned over and clamped down on this newly machined surface. Here after roughing with an insert cutter a light skim is taken with the Newfield fly cutter.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_002.jpg)
I wanted a nice fit on the base and a good datum for future machining operations so a tool path was created and a light cut taken around the base. If all goes well the center point of this profile will be the center line of the cylinder.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_003.jpg)
At this point it was an easy task to drill the mounting holes.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_004.jpg)
Now the body is turned over and located against a couple of parallels that were previously indicated in. This picked up my center line for the cylinder. The body has been machined to the 7.5" over all height; and here is being checked with the height gage.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_005.jpg)
Now the register is cut to locate the cylinder; also a clearance cut is made deeper in the bore to clear the cylinder skirt. On my casting this clearance cut only took a skim at 3 and 9 oíclock and didnít touch anywhere else.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_006.jpg)
The bolt circle for the cylinder is also done at this time.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_007.jpg)
Using the boring head to finish the OD of the cylinder flange; I roughed it out with an end mill but the boring head leaves a nicer finish.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_008.jpg)
Test fitting the cylinder; all is well.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_009.jpg)
Here is the set up to machine the crankshaft clearance between the main bearing saddles.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_010.jpg)
It is a long way down and the 3/8Ē extend length carbide end mill just makes it past the end of the saddle without hitting the body

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_011.jpg)
Starting the cut; I went down in .04Ē steps then took a finish pass a full depth.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_013.jpg)
All finished; there is about .004Ē of endplay clearance for the crank.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_015.jpg)
Now the body is mounted on the angle plate (notice the parallel under the base flange) to machine the main bearing saddle to the proper width.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_014.jpg)
Now flipped over and the same treatment for the other side. .005? was left for a cleanup cut after the main caps are fitted.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Saddle_001.jpg)
I took the body casting over to my friends shop to use his shaper on the top surface of the saddles. Iím sorry I intended to take my camera and forgot it. There is a little more shaper work to be done so I will try to remember to take the camera next time.

Anyway here are the saddles after using the shaper to cut them down to the proper height.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Saddle_002.jpg)
Next up is to layout the relief grooves that locate the main caps; and I get to use some of my tools that havenít seen the light of day for years.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Saddle_003.jpg)
With a freshly sharpened scriber on the height gage the crank center line and layout lines for the reliefs are located and scribed.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Saddle_004.jpg)
With both sides finished the body is ready to go back into the shaper; maybe tomorrow.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 26, 2013, 02:39:30 AM
Once again a very nice and interesting post.
Got a few learnings from it too. Thanks.

The 'Newfield fly cutter'...is that a brand or a type?
I see the picture of it but would you explain its parts a little? What makes it different from others?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 26, 2013, 05:17:10 AM
Big case of tool envy going on.   :Love:    Really drooling over having to stack up the clamps to hold down the piece.   I  can't work any more than a few inches under my mill.   Enjoy seeing how it is done on "real" equipment.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: rudydubya on January 26, 2013, 07:20:37 AM
What Zee and Rick said.  And I learn a lot by just seeing how others set up and hold work on the mill table.  Still following with interest.

Regards,
Rudy

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: metalmad on January 26, 2013, 08:06:50 AM
That is really lovely Dave :Love:
Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on January 26, 2013, 08:30:28 AM
Hey Dave.

What is that a Bridgeport Series 2....I take it a Trak...?

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kellswaterri on January 26, 2013, 03:09:47 PM
Hi Dave, thank you for showing great clamping setups...good use of the boring head on the out side of the part...like Zee I too am interested in that fly cutter.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 27, 2013, 02:02:17 AM
Hi Everyone

Wow thanks for the interest in my little project and all the kind words and questions; I started on this project this last spring and I'm still plugging away, and will be for quite sometime. I still have a bunch of stuff to post to bring the project to date.

The Newfield flycutter or milling cutter as far as i know was made to be used on a horizontal mill; but installed on a shell mill arbor it makes a great flycutter an/or face mill for the Bridgeport style machines. I purchased mine well over 20 years ago and can't remember where; I'm pretty sure they are not made any more. Here is a link to one that sold recently on eBay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400397041220?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

The cool thing about these is the tools can be rotated to the desired angle while also being slid in or out to set the depth and radius of the cut. So you can load up 4 tools and easily set them all at the same radius and depth. I use the top of my milling vise and the back of the rear jaw to set the tools. It is easy to drop the tool down on the flat of the vise and carefully rotate it around so the tool contacts the vertical surface of the vise jaw. Then it is locked down and repeated for the other 3 tools.

If I just want to put a fine finish on something I just use one tool; and put one across from it just for balance set so it doesn't cut.

Dave, My mill is an Acra mill (Bridgeport clone) that I purchased new in 1987. I converted it to 2 axis CNC about 15 years ago using software, motors, and drives from AhHa who is no longer in business. I built the motor mounts and also installed ball screws. It was used it this way for many years and I made lots of parts with it. Wanting something a little more modern a few years ago I started a project upgrade it to Mach 3 and servos with the plan to motorize the quill down the road.  Had I known how well modern steppers with decent drives and software could perform I probably wouldn't have gone the servo rout.

I got the new power box completed with the power supply for the servo amps and a VFD to control the spindle. I was working on the control box that holds the drives and interface board for the PC when I got the castings for the Pacific so the CNC upgrade has stalled or has been temporary pushed to the back burner. What I did do was to build a small interface box with a Homan Designs break out board that allowed me to drive the old AhHa box with a newer PC and Mach.

Mach is able to push my old round stepper motors faster then I ever thought possible; it doubled my rapids with out losing position; this is what made me question my decision about the servos.
So today I running the old AhHa box and round steppers (they say square motors are better) controlled by Mach. 

Hoping some day I will fine time to finish this project; design and build a quill drive or find a good deal on a 3 axis CNC.

Thanks again for all the comments, I appreciate it.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 29, 2013, 01:07:12 AM
Hi Everyone


I took the base casting back over to my buddy?s shop so I could use his shaper to machine the locating reliefs in the main bearing saddles.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_001.jpg)
Here it is set up on the shaper; when he did his it was decided that it would be best to do the saddles one at a time instead of trying to get a bar long enough and a set up that would allow both of them to be cut at the same time. The shaper could do it but it would have required some tooling to mount the base beyond the block on the shaper. As the bearings are going to be bored anyway it really didnít matter.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_002.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_003.jpg)
Getting started; there is no DRO or edge finder on a shaper; so it is pretty much working to your layout lines. I did set up a 1? travel indicator on a mag base so that I could stop at the same point at each end of the cut.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_004.jpg)
Action shot!

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_008.jpg)
An adjustable parallel and mic were used to measure the dimension of the cut. The target was .875?. I got one spot on and the other a couple of thou over. The caps are cut to fit so the finial dimension isnít super critical.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shaper_006.jpg)
All finished and ready for the next operation.

This is the first time for me on the shaper; it is a fun tool and I can see how one could be a great addition to the home shop.

Next is the machining and fitting of the main bearing caps.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_001.jpg)
Here are the caps as received cast as a pair.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_002.jpg)
I decided the best way for me to deal with them would be to saw them apart and work on them individually.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_003.jpg)
The caps were set up so the bolt bosses were aligned vertically by eye with a precision square; then a very light cut taken to give a reference surface. The cap then flipped over and the same done to create two parallel surfaces. Due the thickness of the caps these surfaces will be mostly removed in later operations.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_004.jpg)
Not shown; a skim cut was taken off the bottom on the caps using the newly machined surfaces to hold on to and a parallel to sit it on; referencing the top of the cap.
This operation made the top and bottom parallel; checking here with a square.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_006.jpg)
Now having 3 machined surfaces the holes were located, drilled and spot faced.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_007.jpg)
Using the drilled holes each end of the caps were brought to length; the outboard ends left .005 long so that a skim cut could be taken after they are mounted.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_008.jpg)
Again using the holes as a datum and locating the cap on parallels using the spot faced bolt holes; the final thickness and the locating boss is machined.

The main cap mounting holes on this engine present a problem due to the bottle frame it is impossible to drill and tap them from straight above. This operation required a little special tooling. So here is how I chose to tackle this problem.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_010.jpg)
A pair of drill fixtures that fit in the main cap reliefs were machined from CRS. If these were going to be used more than once they should be hardened; but for a one shot deal I decided to leave them soft.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_009.jpg)
Here is a close up of the drill and driver; the drill was made using a new 135 deg. split point screw machine drill which had most of the shank cut off. The drive portion was made from a 5/16 socket head cap screw (SHCS) with the threads removed and the drill bit silver soldered into a hole drilled through the length of the screw. The bit was held with a pair of aluminum soft jaws in my bench vise for soldering. The driver was made from a Bondhus ball driver cut down and pressed into a piece of 3/8Ē stock.

I had originally planned on just chucking up the hex driver in the drill chuck but the run out was awful; so I went to plan B which was to shorten up the ball driver and press it into the 3/8Ē stock.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_006.jpg)
Here is the drilling operation; the fixture is clamped into position with a parallel machinist clamp. Using my battery powered drill this operation was done by hand. With the new split point drill it was very easy to drill the 4 mounting holes.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_007.jpg)
Here is a close up shot of drill and the driver. The ball hex and the bit were lubricated with some machine oil to make things run a little smoother.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_003.jpg)
Here are the holes drilled and ready to be taped.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_004.jpg)
Here is the hi-tech tapping set up; using a tap guide the holes were tapped first with a spiral point tap and then finished up with a new bottoming tap.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_011.jpg)
Holes have been drilled and tapped and the bearing caps secured with temporary socket head cap screws.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_012.jpg)
Here is a closer view.

Next operation is to set up and drill the clearance holes to pour the Babbitt bearings. The Babbitt will be drilled and bored similar to the previous operation.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 29, 2013, 04:42:39 AM
That shaper sure did a good job.   How would you do this without a shaper?

Nice solution for drilling in an awkward spot.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 29, 2013, 11:02:11 AM
That shaper sure did a good job.   How would you do this without a shaper?

I was wondering the same.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on January 29, 2013, 12:46:17 PM
Quote
That shaper sure did a good job.   How would you do this without a shaper?

You could possibly do it using a slotting head on a milling machine

see the second attachment on this page
http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page4.html (http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page4.html)

They also had them for horizontal machines. You can see an example here

http://www.lathes.co.uk/senior/index.html (http://www.lathes.co.uk/senior/index.html)


Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 29, 2013, 12:59:58 PM
Quote
That shaper sure did a good job.   How would you do this without a shaper?

You could possibly do it using a slotting head on a milling machine

see the second attachment on this page
http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page4.html (http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page4.html)

They also had them for horizontal machines. You can see an example here

http://www.lathes.co.uk/senior/index.html (http://www.lathes.co.uk/senior/index.html)

That pretty much leaves me out.   Good to know.   That is one of the benefits of seeing an engine like this built on the forum.  You get to see what equipment is required rather that getting half way into it and finding out.  :facepalm:   Thanks for the links!   I learned something new.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 29, 2013, 01:10:19 PM
I am remembering some of these pictures from the other site but glad you are reposting here. Beautiful work on what will be a real  showpiece of a model!!  I look forward to each new update.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ScroungerLee on January 29, 2013, 06:04:39 PM
Nice techniques, well explained.  I appreciate your posting this!

Lee
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 30, 2013, 01:15:38 AM
Thanks for the comments guys; I appreciate them.

With regards to the shaper; I guess where there's a will there's a way. Before my buddy purchased the shaper I had though about doing it in my mill. The bulk of the material would have been milled with the side of an end mill; body mounted on an angle plate. Then tool bit in a holder would be put into the spindle and use as a slotting attachment to clean out the corners. With light cuts and care this will work.

I have a 3hp Falk side shaft engine that I have been restoring and when I made new eccentric straps for the fuel pump and ignitor; I used this technique on the rectangular pockets that were for the retainer plates. I think steel might be a bear but the cast iron cuts pretty freely.

I had also thought about having a local shop do it on their wire EDM; not cheap but it would have been painless: the other suggestions are also good. I know there are more than a few of these engines under construction at this time and some of them are being done with out the use of a shaper.


Bill, posting these pictures and updates has been fun and a bit of work. Going back through the pictures and putting the posts together for MEM; one tends to forget how much was accomplished last year in his spare time. It will be nice to get caught up to the current work being done (although not much lately) so I can say this is what I did this last weekend.

Thanks for the kind words; I'm really happy with how the engine is progressing.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 30, 2013, 02:39:29 AM
Hi everyone

Here are the pictures of machining the main bearing bores in preparation of pouring the Babbitt bearings.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap__Boring_001.jpg)
This is the set up in the mill to drill and ream the main bearing bores. I was originally going to bore them to size but I had a ĺĒ reamer so chose to use it instead.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap__Boring_002.jpg)
After the upper bearing was opened up to ľĒ a long center drill was use to spot the lower hole using the upper one as a guide for the drill.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap__Boring_003.jpg)
Stepping up through the drill bits and using the quill power feed the bores were opened up to 23/32Ē which was the closest drill I have to the ĺĒ target.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap__Boring_004.jpg)
Again using the power quill feed the ĺĒ chucking reamer was passed through the bores.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap__Boring_005.jpg)
Nice finish from the reamer; but I will probably rough the bores up a bit (sand blast) to give the Babbitt some tooth.

The next step will be to do some profiling on the castings to make the bearing caps line up with body casting. Then on to pouring the bearings.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_013.jpg)
An endmill is used to machine the sides of the saddles down to match the caps. Due to the way the core is made the bearing saddles have some draft that needs to be removed.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_014.jpg)
A ball endmill is used to rough in the reliefs on the flywheel side of the engine.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_015.jpg)
After an afternoons work using files burrs and emery here are some shots of the result.
1st With the bearing caps removed.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_016.jpg)
And a top view.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_012~0.jpg)
Here is a before shot of the flywheel side bearing.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_017.jpg)
And after.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_019.jpg)
Here is a shot of the governor side.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_020.jpg)
And finally a couple of shots of the major parts.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_021.jpg)
Standing at a little over 15Ē tall sheís starting to look like an engine!

Iím very pleased with how the bearing castings turned out. Now I just need to get some Babbitt poured.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 30, 2013, 03:00:03 AM
That sure looks good Dave.

I'd asked this in another thread but the question was missed...

I've seen several references (as in your post) about stepping through a drill set to get to a desired size.
Why is that rather than drilling with the desired end size?
Thanks.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 30, 2013, 03:18:57 AM
Hi Zee

It is just a matter of chip size you wouldn't want to shove a 3/4" drill through a piece of stock in one shot; unless you had a monster radial drill that would eat 3/4" drills for lunch. So if you step up through the drills maybe a 1/16" or 1/8" and a time your reduce your chip size and hopefully end up with the proper size hole and in the place you wanted it with out killing your machine or tooling.  For production I guess you could really push it; as far as the step sizes go; but for what we do it is not necessary. 

I have a pretty good index of Silver & Deming drills up to one inch; so when I need to drill a big hole I just grab a few between 1/2" and where I need to be and go after it. Not to scientific but I hope I answered your question.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: DavidF on January 30, 2013, 05:37:18 AM
Mental note to self,   Never ever sell my shaper.....
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on January 30, 2013, 10:32:29 AM
Count me down as another big fan of your build Dave

I'd love to build one of these one day. Fortunately my machines aren't big enough for the job and if that's not a legitimate excuse to get some bigger stuff what is?

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: metalmad on January 30, 2013, 10:41:40 AM
Looking fantastic Dave
Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 30, 2013, 11:46:34 AM
Thanks Dave!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 30, 2013, 01:40:36 PM
Those last two pictures really show it off Dave!!  And the pictures and documentation in general are excellent....looking forward to following your progress on this one.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Chris J on January 30, 2013, 02:31:34 PM
All I can say is wow.  :ThumbsUp:

Excellent build only matched by your pictures and explanations.  :)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 31, 2013, 12:30:08 AM
Hi everyone,

Thanks for all the kind words; I appreciate it.

Here is the path I went down to pour the Babbitt crank bearings; I spent most of a Saturday prepping and pouring then got the machining finished on Sunday

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_001.jpg)
Starting out some Babbitt anchors were machined into the bearing caps and saddles. The caps were pretty straightforward using a 5/32? endmill the anchors were drilled about .08? deep.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_002.jpg)
For the body I modified my main cap drilling fixtures to drill the anchors using the 10-32 tap drill. By counter boring the fixture the shoulder on SHCS was used as a drill depth stop.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_003.jpg)
Here the fixture is set up on the body casting.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_004.jpg)
And the drilling in progress.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_005.jpg)
Here the four anchor pin holes are drilled and ready for the next step. I really should have drilled these at an angle to give the anchor pins a little more holding power. Everything worked out ok and I don?t think the bearings are going to go anywhere.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_006.jpg)
Aluminum shims (.040") were cut and placed in the reliefs for the bearing caps; there is still some of the relief available to locate the main cap. These shims will create the parting line of the bearings.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_007.jpg)
Aluminum plates were cut and placed over the inside of the bearing bores. Then they were held in place with a bolt and nut used as a jack screw.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_008.jpg)
Here is the assembly ready for the Babbitt damming clay; the shims were left about .125" long so extra Babbitt could be poured to cover the shrink as it cooled.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_009.jpg)
Babbitt damming clay is applied around the bearing bores and up to the height of the shims. This will allow more Babbitt to be poured than is needed for the shrink as mentioned above.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_010.jpg)
Here is my melting setup; this nice propane stove my brother got surplus from his employer and the cast iron bottom pouring ladle was an eBay purchase.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_011.jpg)
The Babbitt is warming up to 800 degrees F. and will char a pine stick when inserted. Also the bearing castings are preheated with a propane torch to remove any moisture.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_014.jpg)
Sorry I can?t shoot and pour at the same time. But here is one of the bearings just after pouring.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_015.jpg)
After both bearings have been poured the center plates are removed; looks pretty good.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_016.jpg)
The damming clay is removed from the outside of the bearings.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_017.jpg)
After cutting the excess Babbitt down to the iron casting the caps are removed.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_018.jpg)
And a closer shot of the body.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_019.jpg)
Now some shims are needed to be able to adjust for wear in the future. I first punched the hole and then trimmed the inside edge with sharp scissors.
Then the hole was aligned the hole in the bearing cap and the outline traced with a sharp scribe.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_020.jpg)
Then the shim is cut out using scissors.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_021.jpg)
Here is the punch that I used to punch the holes in the shim. These are a little on the pricey side but sure work nice. It also has pilots and can be used to punch shim washers.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_022.jpg)
And a nice little pile of bearing shims.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_023.jpg)
The shims are placed on the upper parting surface of the bearing caps.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_024.jpg)
With the shims installed and the caps tightened up the body is set up in the mill to drill and bore the bearings.
I used pretty much the same drill as before (no pun intended). Center drill, drill and bore to size. Again the upper bearing was opened up to .25" and then it was used to guide a long center drill for the lower bearing.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_025.jpg)
Stepping up through the drills the bore was opened up to 19/32".

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_026.jpg)
I made an adapter to use my 3/8" solid carbide insert boring bar in the boring head. This worked well except I had to run it pretty slow to avoid chatter.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Bearings_027.jpg)
Here is the finished bore; some hand work and secondary machining operation still need to be done.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/thumb_Main_Bearings_028.jpg)
I?m happy to report that the crankshaft does fit in the body and turns. It is a little tight and has no end play but these are problems I can deal with; better than too loose.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on January 31, 2013, 01:10:43 AM
love the babbit bearings Dave. Are they mostly tin or mostly lead?

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 31, 2013, 01:23:43 AM
Hi Steve

Mostly lead with a little tin and antimony; my buddy used to go to a big machine shop here in town that pours and machines very large bearings and they would let him pick up all the bits and pieces from around the melting pot. He poured many hit and miss engine bearings out of those scraps. So I don't know the exact alloy but if it was good enough for a 14" bearing in an industrial plant it will probably be ok for my little engine.  :)

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on January 31, 2013, 03:22:04 AM
Love seeing the real babbit bearings done.   It is one item I decided against on my Cretors.   The original engines used babbit.   
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 31, 2013, 04:13:50 AM
I have enjoyed following your progress Dave, beautiful job pouring the Babbitt. You present a well documented thread great for learning from. Thanks for sharing.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 31, 2013, 10:59:35 PM
Wow that is really fascinating Dave. I was very curious about what you'd meant about 'pouring'.
A very informative post.

And BTW...just look at the work table! A lot of stuff has been made on top of that.
That's a keeper to hand down. So many stories in that top.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 01, 2013, 01:42:57 AM
Hi guys,

Thanks again for all your kind comments.

Pouring Babbitt bearings isn't all that bad of a job and you wouldn't believe how smooth they run. Some engines used Babbitt shells or inserts that fit into machined saddles. The Fairbanks Z engines were like this and my 3hp Falk that I'm restoring also has Babbitt insert bearings. I made these by machining a mold that would make a cored piece of material with some extra length for chucking. 

Then the slug was chucked up in the lathe and all the turning done and parted from the chucking piece. Then the bearing was put in the mill and using a slitting saw it was split in two. After which it was machined down to match the parting line of the bearing shells, shimmed and scraped to a nice running fit.

This could easily be done on a smaller scale for a model; you wouldn't even need to pour the slug you could just hack it out of a Babbitt ingot.  I'm thinking I may do this on my Little Brother engine when I get going on it again.

Zee, Thanks for noticing my little bench; I made it abut 25 years ago and just love it. It is small enough that I have to keep it clean; or at least clean it up at the end of the day. It started out as  a cut off from a much longer work bench; excess from the day job. This is why the boards run the wrong direction; a buddy and I welded up the frame and put some wheels on it. It sits directly behind my lathe and also behind the mill although 90 degrees to it. This way I only need to turn around and most everything I need is there.

I have other benches but this one gets used the most.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Work_Bench.jpg)
Here is a shot of the whole thing; no I don't drink and machine but it was the end of the day.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 01, 2013, 01:51:39 AM
Nice looking shop!
Now had that drink been in a mason jar...all would be perfect.  ;D
I like those wood cabinets. There's something about the warmth of wood.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 01, 2013, 09:04:48 AM
Beautiful Shop!

Mine will look that good someday!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Bearcar1 on February 01, 2013, 02:00:24 PM
Ohh! A civilized blighter now aren't we? 'e uses a glass and coaster  :DrinkPint: We usually just swill out of the can or bottle, no need to dirty up any dishes that way you know.  :smokin2: :facepalm2: :naughty:


BC1
Jim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on February 01, 2013, 02:44:40 PM
Very nice.  Now I not only have tool envy but shop envy as well!.   :DrinkPint:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kellswaterri on February 01, 2013, 03:03:56 PM
Serious shop envy here Dave...good collection of plum bobs...'babbit bearings'  brings back memories of 50+ years ago when I was building the big engines.     
                                                                                 John.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 01, 2013, 07:48:04 PM
Dave,
Your work and your shop are an inspiration for this beginner!

I showed her your shop and explained that was what I needed. She just shrugged and walked away. I wonder what she meant?

Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 02, 2013, 01:32:34 AM
Wow guys.

I just though I would show Zee my small work bench; I didn't realize it would generate such a great response. Funny thing; you can't see any of my machines in this picture just the corner where I keep some of my collectable junk. I like the look and feel of my little place and because it is warm and my PC is out there that is where I spend quite a bit of time working or not.

Ohh! A civilized blighter now aren't we? 'e uses a glass and coaster  :DrinkPint: We usually just swill out of the can or bottle, no need to dirty up any dishes that way you know.  :smokin2: :facepalm2: :naughty:


BC1
Jim

Jim what you don't see is the keg fridge back in the corner; my brother, a friend of mine and I home brew. When I don't have home brew a few of the local brew pubs will fill my 5gal corny kegs for me so I usually have a keg or two of something good to drink. Sorry no caned beer for this guy. the coaster usually holds the coffee cup. :cheers:

Zee the oak cabinets were postal surplus; back when my dad worked at the PO he purchased them at a postal auction. They had completely remodeled  PO in a small town abut 100 miles from here. they moved all the excess stuff to Boise to sell it off. Dad being a cabinet maker recognized the quality 1/4 sawed oak under the government gray paint. The cabinet with the small drawers was a stamp cabinet and the one with the larger drawers held fingerprinting supplies. You should have seen the look on the guys face that refinished them for me when I told him that i was going to put them in my shop.

Thanks again for the comments.
Dave  :DrinkPint:


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 02, 2013, 01:55:38 AM
Hi Everyone

Now that the bearings were complete we need some proper hardware to put it all together; and also a little hand work on the upper bearing

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_023.jpg)
Because the parting line of the bearing is not on the center-line of the crank shaft the upper bearing shell needs to have some clearance so that it can be dropped over the crank. This was done by hand with a triangle scraper; scrape a little check the fit and repeat until the cap could be dropped into position.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_024.jpg)
Making the nuts is a pretty straight forward turning job; here is the way I did it. First the hex stock was faced, center drilled and drilled. Then the shoulder was turned.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_025.jpg)
Then the nut is parted off a little over length.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_026.jpg)
Flipped around in the chuck the nut is tapped?

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_027.jpg)
A mandrel was turned to hold the nut so the top side could be finished.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_028.jpg)
The nut is screwed on to the mandrel and faced to length; then the bevel is cut.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_029.jpg)
Here are the finished studs and nuts.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Main_Cap_Fitting_030.jpg)
And here they are installed on the engine.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
________________________________________

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 02, 2013, 01:38:03 PM
How do you turn the taps while threading in the lathe?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 03, 2013, 01:25:35 AM
How do you turn the taps while threading in the lathe?

Hi Mosey

On a part like this with a through hole I just slide the tail stock up to the part until the tap starts to cut then just keep a little pressure in it and let the tap do the work. Once the thread is all the way through The lathe is reversed and the tap backed out. Works good with free cutting metals and spiral pointed taps that push the chip out it in front of the tap.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 03, 2013, 01:57:21 AM
Hi everyone,

After getting the main bearings and hardware finished I wanted to address the crankshaft lubrication. Not wanting to use off the shelf lubricators I chose to model the Lunkenheimer Tiger #1 grease cup. I have always liked the looks of this cup and have a few NOS ones on the shelf for a full sized engine restoration project.

I decided on using 3/16 MTP for the threads and after a little head scratching, and measuring I decided that .35 scale would work out pretty good. So here is the construction of my 1/3 scale Lunk. grease cups.

It would be nice to say this was an afternoon project but I messed around with them for the better part of two days.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_001a.jpg)
Here is one of the finished cups along with the pattern.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GreaseCup_001b_zpsdd5d9d63.jpg)
And here is another view.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_001.jpg)
First all the diameters of the body were turned and the MTP threads cut using a die in a tailstock die holder.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_003.jpg)
Then the body was transferred to the mill and the hex cut using a spin indexer.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_004.jpg)
Back in the lathe the 20 degree bevel is cut on the bottom of the hex using a boring bar.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_005.jpg)
Now the 1/2-36 threads are single point threaded.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_006.jpg)
The bodies were parted off a little long then re-chucked in a 9/32? collet.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_007.jpg)
After facing to length a counter bore is drilled to match the prototype.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_008.jpg)
The cap was turned, bored, knurled and single point threaded all in one setup.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_010.jpg)
Then they were parted off a little long.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_011.jpg)
Using the body as a mandrel and screwing the cap up against the collet the caps were faced to length and the chamfer cut.

Not shown; the cap was drilled and a dummy rivet installed. This rivet holds a spring detent on the full sized cup.
(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_012.jpg)
Here is a pair of the finished cups ready for service.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_013.jpg)
And one last shot of them installed on the engine.

I'm working on engraving the lettering on the top of the cup but haven't had time to work it into the schedule yet; I'm hoping to use a drag engraver on the CNC mill either with a diamond or carbide tip. The tooling is available I just need to get the CAD done and engrave some test pieces to see how it works out.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Grease_Cup_014.jpg)
Here is a shot of the lettering on the cup.
 

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ths on February 03, 2013, 06:36:21 AM
Hi Dave,

I'm really enjoying this build, the staggered depth bearing caps, in fact all to do with the bearings are a joy to behold.

My one question is, will you be using oil or grease in the greasers, and does it matter which? (sorry, two questions!).

Hugh.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on February 03, 2013, 10:06:13 AM
Really nice job on the oil cups Dave. They came up a treat

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 03, 2013, 06:56:52 PM
Hi Everyone & thanks for the comments Zee I appreciate it,


I got a harebrained idea to make the crankshaft out of 1144 Stress-Proof thinking that it may stay a little straighter as the excess material was cut away. The smallest piece I could get that would work was 2 ?? dia. So a bunch of material needed to be removed.

After facing the stock to length in my lathe at home I took the blank to work so I could cut it down in my mill there. Flood coolant, a face mill and a 10 hp. Spindle motor made quick work of it.

Also while in the mill at work I drilled the centers and removed the excess material for the throw.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_1_zpsae7f1b24.jpg)
Cutting to length

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_3_zps05e34c39.jpg)
The Stress-Proof sure turns nice

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_4_zps066f462f.jpg)
In my mill at work getting ready to make the round bar into a rectangle

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_5_zps7a80897a.jpg)
Pretty much to size; I left .050? on the thickness so I could finish it on my friends shaper later on.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_6_zps60816722.jpg)
Set up to drill the centers

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_7_zps7a3d07db.jpg)
Action shot!

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_8_zps9551a817.jpg)
And the finished centers

After the excess material was removed for the throw; I did have to straighten it a little. It had about .02? bow over the length; a little tweaking in the arbor press got it acceptable.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_9_zps6c191c60.jpg)
Here is the blank set up in the lathe to turn the throw. The wire near the end is hold the blank against a threaded stud which I?m using to drive the blank. The stud is screwed into a hole in the flange of the collet adaptor.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_12_zps2c2758eb.jpg)
Action shot!

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_13_zpsac57385d.jpg)
Here it is with the throw pretty much finished. Besides the turning tool shown I also use small left and right hand insert tools to finish the inside faces of the cheeks


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_14_zpsa294827a.jpg)
Using the band saw to blank out the extra material; the Roll-In saw makes this part of the job a breeze.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_16_zps9d51e00a.jpg)
Both sides have been cut and now it?s ready to go back in the lathe; it?s starting to look like a crankshaft now.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_17_zpsbfa57154.jpg)
Set up between centers and turning the long end.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_19_zps2f1c1546.jpg)
I ended up turning the shafts to fractional dimensions larger than the finished size so I could rough it out and use collets for holding the already turned ends. My original plan was to do the whole job between centers; but I was fighting chatter real bad and the collet solved this aggravating problem. Here it is flipped around and working on the short end

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_20_zps7a730fbe.jpg)
Here is the set up in the mill to cut the key ways.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_21_zpsf6bb8012.jpg)
And a closer shot.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_22_zps13502a5a.jpg)
After the crank was finished I took it over to my friends shop and used his shaper to finish the cheeks to .750? thick. Remember that I had left them over size in anticipation of this. The shaper creates a finish that looks like it could have been ground. The shaper is also going to get a workout cutting the bearing pads on the body casting.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Crankshaft_23_zps66cf56d7.jpg)
As I told my buddy; the bench centers allow you analyze or agonize over really small TIR numbers. Over all I?m very happy with the way the crank turned out.

Next up; starting work on the body casting.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

May I ask for little more info about how you determined the "bow" in the crank, and how you straightened it?
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 05, 2013, 01:26:13 AM
Hi Dave,

I'm really enjoying this build, the staggered depth bearing caps, in fact all to do with the bearings are a joy to behold.

My one question is, will you be using oil or grease in the greasers, and does it matter which? (sorry, two questions!).

Hugh.

Hugh

Thanks for the kind words.
These cups are designed for grease only; the grease is packed into the cup and as it is screwed down on to the body it will force the grease into the bearing. On these cups there really isn't any place to put any oil.

Mosey

After the crank was blanked out on the band saw there were still two of the original machined surfaces; these should been on the same plane. so it was an easy task to run an indicator over them to determine the bow. Straightening was a matter of putting it in the arbor press and pushing in the middle  until it was straight again.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Crankshaft_16.jpg)
Here you can see the two straight surfaces that will be machined away to from the shaft.

Actually what happened was that the shaft on each side of the throw had it's own bow; of course the long side was worse the the short side. I decided that I could live with the error and just machine it out. This may have made a very small change in the stroke length; but not a big deal at all.

Thanks for asking
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 05, 2013, 03:01:28 AM
I appreciate your taking the time to answer what is a novice question. I wonder whether cranks bow after time as the stresses are released. Could you season them after the first big cuts, and come back later to finish with light cuts. My crank is bowed after a few years of sitting.
Strange. I'll follow your lead and straighten.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on February 05, 2013, 09:36:32 AM
Looking great Dave, even down to the studs and nuts - single point threading is something I'm going to have to practise. The crank looks amazing, this is proper engineering - made me realise I'm just pittling about!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 06, 2013, 12:36:36 AM
I appreciate your taking the time to answer what is a novice question. I wonder whether cranks bow after time as the stresses are released. Could you season them after the first big cuts, and come back later to finish with light cuts. My crank is bowed after a few years of sitting.
Strange. I'll follow your lead and straighten.

Mosey, I suppose it is possible for metal to continue to move but I would think if you started with something the was relatively stress free once you finish it would stay straight. If you are using anything that has been cold rolled all bets are off.

One time I took a skim cut on some cast iron model flywheels of an engine I was fixing up to remove rust and pitting; and there was a slight bump or high spot over every spoke. So these flywheels continued to move after they were machined the first time.

Looking great Dave, even down to the studs and nuts - single point threading is something I'm going to have to practise. The crank looks amazing, this is proper engineering - made me realise I'm just pittling about!

Thanks for the kind words Nick; I guess It is all relative. Sometimes when I see the beautiful work others do, I pretty much feel the same way; there are some truly amazing models out there.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 06, 2013, 12:57:22 AM
Hi Everyone
Next up is the machining of the flywheel; as I think I have said before I prefer to do as much fettling as possible before starting on the machine work.
(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_001a.jpg)
Here is the flywheel casting after smoothing out some of the bumps. The castings are sandblasted after fettling to give everything a uniform finish.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_001.jpg)
Using my 8Ē Adjust-Tru chuck the flywheel is indicated in. First the spokes and inner rim are adjusted with a DTI for the best possible run out. Then the inner rim is adjusted radialy using the Adjust-Tru feature of the chuck.
A solid carbide boring bar with a brazed tool is used to knock the OD down close to the finished dimension.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_002.jpg)
After a little fussing around I was able to reach around and machine the back side with one of my insert holders.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_005.jpg)
The hub is faced to the proper dimension relative the face on the same side. Then center drilled and drilled close to the finished size.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_006.jpg)
Using a boring bar the bore is brought to the final dimension.
Not shown; the flywheel is reversed in the chuck, indicated in and the hub on the back side is machined to the proper dimension. Also the chamfers are cut on this side as well.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_007.jpg)
My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_008.jpg)

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_010.jpg)
And finally here are a couple pictures of the engine showing off its new flywheel.

Next a gib head key was machined to hold the flywheel on; nothing to fancy here.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Key_001a.jpg)
I didnít take many pictures but here Iím cutting the 1/8Ē per foot taper on the key. A tapered parallel was made for this operation

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Key_001.jpg)
Here is the completed key next to the quick and dirty print I made for it.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Key_002.jpg)
After a little had fitting and installed on the engine.
I should have turned the OD of the hub area on the front and back of the flywheel; I will most likely set it back up in the lathe and take care of that before the engine is completed.
Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 06, 2013, 01:10:06 AM
I almost feel like slinking away but I know you've been where I am. I have to learn some how.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 06, 2013, 01:20:46 AM
No no don't go!

Remember were having fun ;)

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: tvoght on February 06, 2013, 01:31:10 AM
I had been watching this build over on the other site, but I lost the trail at some point. I've re-read everything, and now we're on material I haven't yet seen. Really great documentation. Beautiful pictures.

--Tim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 06, 2013, 01:54:07 AM
Thanks Tim,

I'm slowly getting caught up; I still have a long way to go on my engine so at some point in the near future what I post will be current info.
It has been fun going back through and updating the text and posting pictures; gives me an idea of what I did last year.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on February 06, 2013, 03:50:27 AM
Starting to look great with the pieces in context.   Looking more like a piece of art.   :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 06, 2013, 04:12:15 AM
I agree with Rick, it sure is shaping up. Thanks for educational thread and photos. Getting a blow by blow will help whenever I decide to do casting.

Don
Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on February 06, 2013, 07:48:05 AM
Watching you do the flywheel has made me realise something I mustn't do when I machine my cast one - shouldn't turn the OD of the boss, I did it on the only other cast flywheel I've machined and it doesn't look right. Should be painted up to the face.
Looking good.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Chris J on February 06, 2013, 09:26:45 AM

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flywheel_007_zps860d5062.jpg)
My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.


I'm not quite sure what is going on here, not familiar with that machine and what broaching is.

What a fabulous bit of work and a thread to match.

Chris
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 07, 2013, 02:15:50 AM
Hi Guys

Thanks or all the great comments; I sure appreciate them.

Watching you do the flywheel has made me realise something I mustn't do when I machine my cast one - shouldn't turn the OD of the boss, I did it on the only other cast flywheel I've machined and it doesn't look right. Should be painted up to the face.
Looking good.

Nick you got me thinking; initially I was not happy because I forgot to machine the hubs but after your comment and looking at my full sized engines; I think I just may leave the hubs rough cast.


(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Flywheel_007.jpg)
My buddy had already made the broach bushing for the tapered key; so I borrowed it and here is the broaching operation.


I'm not quite sure what is going on here, not familiar with that machine and what broaching is.

What a fabulous bit of work and a thread to match.

Chris

Chris the tool is an arbor press; it is a hand operated rack and pinion style press. They are nice because you have good feel of what you are doing. They come in lots of different sizes; this one is a Dake #3 a nice American made tool.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Work_Bench.jpg)
I posted this picture the other day but if you look at the left hand side you can see the arbor press poking out from behind my work bench.

The broach is a key-way cutting tool that is pushed through the work with the press; it has staggered (or stepped ) teeth so each tooth takes a little more material than the previous one. The broach is guided by the bushing that is inserted in the bore. Usually after the first pass a shim is installed behind the broach and it is pushed through again until the key-way is the desired depth. In this picture the broach has been pushed far enough into the bore that you can't see the teeth.

In this case the bushing was machined with the broach guide at a 1/8" per foot angle to match the key. This way when the key is tapped in place it locks up and holds the flywheel securely to the crankshaft.

Hope this helps,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Chris J on February 07, 2013, 08:17:44 AM

Chris the tool is an arbor press; it is a hand operated rack and pinion style press. They are nice because you have good feel of what you are doing. They come in lots of different sizes; this one is a Dake #3 a nice American made tool.

I posted this picture the other day but if you look at the left hand side you can see the arbor press poking out from behind my work bench.

The broach is a key-way cutting tool that is pushed through the work with the press; it has staggered (or stepped ) teeth so each tooth takes a little more material than the previous one. The broach is guided by the bushing that is inserted in the bore. Usually after the first pass a shim is installed behind the broach and it is pushed through again until the key-way is the desired depth. In this picture the broach has been pushed far enough into the bore that you can't see the teeth.

In this case the bushing was machined with the broach guide at a 1/8" per foot angle to match the key. This way when the key is tapped in place it locks up and holds the flywheel securely to the crankshaft.

Hope this helps,
Dave

Ah thanks Dave.

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 07, 2013, 09:50:44 AM
Very nicely done Dave!

 :praise2: :praise2:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on February 07, 2013, 12:04:38 PM
Seems I missed a few days of checking in on you Dave and missed a LOT of progress on it. Truly amazing work as always from the babbit bearings to the grease cups to the bearing hardward, crankshaft and finally the flywheel. What a showpiece !!!!  I'll try to stay more current from now on :)

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 08, 2013, 12:52:27 AM
Bill and Dave, Thanks and Thanks,

My project has kind of stalled on my end due to other time commitments; I starting to feel withdrawal symptoms. I need to carve out at least a few hours to work on the engine to cure this problem; maybe this weekend.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 08, 2013, 01:12:33 AM
Hi Everyone,

Here are some pictures of machining the 12-24 high crown bolts for the cylinder and body to sub base mounting; I also made a few extras to mount the engine to the display base or skid. Also some machining to the bottom of the cylinder mounting flange to tidy it up as the rough cast surface is uneven and the flange was too thick.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts.jpg)
The 5/16" hex stock was chucked in the small 3 jaw; turned, chamfered and threaded with the tail stock die holder.

[IMGhttp://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts_2.jpg[/img]http://The bolts are turned around and held in a collet; turned to length and the radius cut using a form tool.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts_3.jpg)
Here are the finished bolts; the long ones will be used to hold the engine to the skids or base when the time comes.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts_4.jpg)
Here are the cylinder mounting bolts installed; note there are two of them under the water ports that have to be shorter to clear the piping. This is also the way the original engines were.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bolts_5.jpg)
Here is a wormís eye view of the same.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_Mods_1.jpg)
One detail still needing attention on the body casting was to thin the cylinder mounting flange. The way mine came out I needed to remove almost .1" to get it to the .281" dimension on the print.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_Mods_2.jpg)
A support bar was made to support the flange end while the body was held in the 4 jaw chuck. The center was left a little loose while the flange was indicated; then tightened enough to support the body.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_Mods_3.jpg)
Here you can see the rough cast uneven surface of the underside of the flange.

(http://lister-engine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Body_Mods_4.jpg)
And after a little machining and blending.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 08, 2013, 01:24:26 AM
Love to follow your work Dave , it truly amazing work and all beautifully done to high quality. Great photos also.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 10, 2013, 02:38:43 PM
Dave,
After following you on this project, and seeing the organized, expert, and careful work, I went back into my shop determined to do better. I am more focused and careful. The work is a level better. now.
Thanks.
Will be watching you.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on February 10, 2013, 02:49:56 PM
I agree with Mosey a 1000%. this thread has been as much motivational as educational. This is what us "junior model makers" should strive for. :NotWorthy: :cheers:

Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 12, 2013, 01:13:29 AM
Hi Everyone,

Don, Mossey & Eric you guys are too kind but I do really appreciate your comments and it makes me proud that this little project is an inspiration to others; is has also given me some great shop time and enjoyment so far and for me that is what it is all about.

Working on the exhaust valve chest casting and some of the related timing parts. The relationship of all these parts is somewhat critical so everything aligns and works properly. I took only the minimum amount from the valve chest mating surfaces to clean the rough casting. I wanted to keep the valve (initially) as far from the center line of the engine as possible. As it turned out this worked out well; if you build one of these engines I would highly recommend proceeding with caution at this stage.

You will probably notice that some of the pictures seem out of order; this is because I stuffed the original valve chest casting and had to request a new one from Roland :wallbang:. The ports have a D shaped hole that connect the ports above and below the valve seat; well the first one on the exit side came out fine but when I did the inlet side I neglected to rotate the D 180 degrees and cut right into the valve seat. So I did things a little differently on the new casting as far as the order of operations. So some of the photos are from the first casting and some from the replacement.

Also the upper swing arm bracket was completed before I fitted the valve chest to the cylinder as you will see in a future post. I wasnít sure just how everything was going to line up so there is a little jumping around; but in the end all is well (I think).

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_001.jpg)
Here is the raw casting after a little cleanup and a trip through the blast cabinet.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_002.jpg)
Holding onto the valve guide I was able to satisfactorily center up the casting in my little 3 jaw chuck. Working carefully the chucking boss was faced and center drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_003.jpg)
The chucking boss is finished turned and the top of the casting faced off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_004.jpg)
The casting is flipped around and the valve guide rough turned as well as the bottom being faced off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_005.jpg)
In the mill vice the casting is squared with the side surfaces which will not be machined.

[/img]http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_006.jpg[/img]
The gasket surface is cleaned up (just barely).

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_007.jpg)
Using the center-line as the datum the sides are machined to match the boss on the cylinder. The mounting holes were also drilled at this time.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_008.jpg)
Back in the lathe the valve guide is turned to size and length; I removed quite a bit of material from the bottom so the chest would match its mounting boss on the cylinder.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_009.jpg)
Flipped around the chucking lug was removed and the boring and threading done for the valve chamber and plug. Most of the chucking lug was removed in the band saw first.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_011.jpg)
The print said to spot face the nut locations but I prefer the look of having the whole surfaced milled so that is how I finished the mounting flanges.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_012.jpg)
Here the water jacket ports are being faced off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_013.jpg)
Spot drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_014.jpg)
Drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_015.jpg)
And taped 1/16-27 NPT.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_016.jpg)
Finished; same for the other side.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/thumb_Valve_Chest_017.jpg)
The valve guide is indicated in.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_018.jpg)
The valve guide is drilled and reamed.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_010.jpg)
The exhaust port is taped ľĒ NPT.



I still need to do a little hand work and cut the valve seat but for the most part the valve chest is complete.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 12, 2013, 02:01:57 AM
I CONFESS...I want to see you cut the seat.
Mosey

Is that thin springy strip a protector for the casting from marking by the vise jaws?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on February 12, 2013, 02:46:02 AM
Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 12, 2013, 03:26:20 AM
I can't add much to what everyone else is saying. I'm really enjoying this.

Good eye Mosey. I'm wondering what that shim looking thing is for too.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on February 12, 2013, 07:25:59 AM
Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:

 :o I wish you hadn't mentioned that, I was finding the neat and tidy work bench a few shots back unnerving but those photo's without swarf :hellno: they look rather scary now :paranoia:

Nice work on the engine. I wish when I worked with cast Iron it was as clean as you are making it look :Lol:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 12, 2013, 08:56:31 AM
NIIIICE build Dave!   I think the springy thing is a spring keeper to keep the parallels in place as he manipulates the part.

....and pay no never mind to the swarfless crowd....I know what chips look like....I want to see the part! ;D :ROFL:

Keep it coming Dave!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 12, 2013, 01:11:22 PM
Rudy Kouhoupt had a chipless shop, also. Look at his videos.
The secret is a good dustpan and vacuum cleaner.
Suspicions of witchcraft.
Nice, though.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 13, 2013, 01:14:49 AM
Mosey, we will get that valve seat cut; its down the road aways I have a bit more material to get posted first.
Steamer is correct; the springy thin is a parallel keeper. I purchased it years ago from one of the industrial suppliers; can't remember who though.

>>Now I am really impressed;  swarfless machining!!   I have not learned to do that yet  :Lol:

Aw common not all my pictures are swarfless; just some of them :).

Thanks everyone for the complements, I appreciate them.

Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 13, 2013, 02:02:42 AM
Rudy once told me that the most used tool in his shop was his shop vac!

Keep it coming Dave.....Sweeeeeeet!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 14, 2013, 01:30:27 AM
Hi everyone

Continuing on with the exhaust valve chest, exhaust valve and related parts; I would like to try to finish this assembly before I move on to the piston, rod, and head.

My plan thus far is to deviate from the plans somewhat; Iím working to keep everything proper as far as the prototype goes. I decided not to use a couple of iron castings that came with the kit; the first one is the top support; this part guides the bottom end of the valve and also serves as a pivot for the top end of the swing arm. The reason is, first I like the look of the brass parts on the original engine; and second I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

I modeled the top support in Alibre and carved it out on my CNC here at home. It is only a 2 axis so there was a lot of hand work involved.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_002.jpg)
Here is the basic profile being cut from brass bar stock.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_003.jpg)
The boss for the swing arm pivot is machined as it is centered in the support but not as thick.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_004.jpg)
After the top side was machined the part was turned over and the bulk of the excess material removed from one end (notice the valve guide was reamed in the previous step).
Using the valve guide as the datum the bottom side of the pivot boss is machined.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/UpperBracket_005.jpg)
The rest of the excess material is removed in the band saw.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_005.jpg)
After the support is brought to proper thickness the excess junk will be cut away.

I got carried away and didnít take very many pictures of this process but after the machine work was completed quite a bit of time was spent with files and sandpaper getting an acceptable shape.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_007.jpg)
I also got carried away and neglected to leave enough material for the bosses on the top and bottom of the valve guide; those were turned up and silver soldered in place.


Now the is set up in the mill to fit the upper and lower swing arm supports along with drilling and taping the valve chest mounting holes and drilling exhaust port. I altered the shape of the bottom support bracket from the print just a little; all the brackets I have seen pictures of are a little different shape and style from one to the other. I think the horsepower of the engine and possibly age determined the style of the support. I chose to model the simple right angle support with its mounting holes in line above each other.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_019.jpg)
Here the body casting along with the cylinder is set up in the mill and dialed in using the crank bearing for the datum. Every thing is based off of the center line of the engine.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_020.jpg)
The upper support mounting pads are machined to the final height; this is based on the valve chest mounting boss. I set my valve chest and upper support on the surface plate and measured the valve stem centerline. As it turns out on my engine they are in the same plane; so this is what I cut the pads to.

I will remove .01Ē form the valve chest later to accommodate the copper valve chest gasket thickness.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_021.jpg)
The pads are spotted, drilled, and tapped for the upper support.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_023.jpg)
The exhaust port is drilled into the cylinder.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_024.jpg)
Finished!

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_029.jpg)
I didnít take and pictures of the machining but here are the exhaust valve chest studs installed in the cylinder.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Chest_028.jpg)
And with the valve chest and proper nuts installed.

Next I will go over the swing arm and lower support machining.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 14, 2013, 01:39:08 AM
Dave, if you would of never said anything I would of never known you had messed up. It is looking great to me. You photos a top rate and love to follow along with you.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 14, 2013, 01:54:17 AM
Nice job on that support. Really beautiful.
And another great post!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 14, 2013, 02:05:53 AM
Wow Dave....that is beautiful!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 14, 2013, 02:15:51 AM
Don,

I could have salvaged the casting as the error was internal and would have never showed. It would have involved plugging two holes and re-machining them. I weighed both options and starting over was easier and Roland had the casting on hand. A couple of days and I had the new casting in the mail (he is good that way).


Zee, a while back you guys were talking bout blasting parts to change the texture; the support bracket was blasted with super fine glass bead in my homemade blast cabinet. I really like the finish it gives to machined parts that should have been a casting; it also does a beautiful job on bronze castings but I don't care for it so much on iron castings.

Thanks guys.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 14, 2013, 02:17:17 AM
Thanks Dave!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on February 14, 2013, 02:29:25 AM
Very nice work with the files and sandpaper.   Bracket looks great.   
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on February 14, 2013, 07:19:39 AM
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Stuart on February 14, 2013, 08:06:08 AM
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo


Jo

of course we are interested in any fabrication technique , BTW what is the quality of the castings from Cotswolds ?  PM if you do not wish to comment here


Stuart
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on February 14, 2013, 08:22:23 AM
Stuart,

The castings from Cotwold are very good, it is the mounting costs for each of the sets for the Armstrong that aren't. Personally I think that there are two castings from set B that I would choose to start from a casting rather than fabricate: the governor pedestal & feed pump, but I would part fabricated the pump starting from the casting  ;). 

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Stuart on February 14, 2013, 10:30:33 AM
thanks for the info


yes the part kit bit adds up





Stuart
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 15, 2013, 01:08:36 AM
I donít plan (at this time) to use the governor and I didnít want to hack the governor latch mount off of it incase I change my mind later.

 :o But the governors are one of the really fun bits to make and... and   :-X

Dave, I am always impressed by what can be done by both CNC and the likes of Jason's water jetting. Personally I consider both expensive and I would personally have been tempted to have made your the bracket using seperate parts silver soldered together. (If anyone is interested when I get around to the Armstrong Hydraulic engine I will be showing a lot of fabrications ;))

Jo

Hi Jo

I like governors too; especially the vertical fly ball type. There are several reasons I'm not using the governor on my engine; first and foremost I have a plan to model a double acting pump that will be gear driven from the crank shaft on the PTO side of the engine. This will be scaled from some original advertising and the gear drive will reside where the governor would mount on the crankshaft.


The Pacific governor is a dog bone type that operates a sleeve on the crank which intern operates the latch arm to hold the exhaust valve open.
The governor adds interest to the engine but it doesn't work very well at this size; my preference for  hit and miss engines is to have them hit one time and come up on the governor and latch out. The way this one works it take several (or more) hits to come up to speed. This is compounded by the piston trip ignitor which by design always has the timing retarded. The engine doesn't hit hard enough to help get it up on the governor on the first hit; the engine also has low compression due the large dead volume in the combustion chamber. This can be improved somewhat by making the piston taller or the rod longer; but you can only go so far with that.

Not all Pacific engines had governors and I'm not sure if any of the little guys had them. My engine is roughly a 1/3 scale of a 3/4 HP engine so it is one of the little guys. If I can pull it off the pump and it's drive system will more than make up for the lack of the governor.

Here is a picture of a large full sized engine on display at Antique Power Land near Brooks, Oregon; you can see the dog bone weight on the crank.
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Buzz_002.jpg)

I agree with you fully on the fabrication; some of the work going on around here is just incredible. I will fabricate when needed but I really enjoy the CNC process; the CAD design work, creating tool paths in the CAM program and finally setting up and running the machine. Is CNC necessary to build this engine? not at all; there have already be been more than a few built using conventional machine tools.

I'm able to stick a few things together but fabrication is an area of model engineering where I could use a little more practice; well maybe more than just a little.

I would love to see your work on the Armstrong Hydraulic engine.

Thanks everyone for the comments and kind words.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 16, 2013, 01:03:04 AM
Hi Everyone

Iím still working on exhaust valve related stuff; here are a group of pictures showing the machining of the swing arm. The swing arm holds the crossover cam follower shoe and the valve lifter. It is suspended between the upper and lower supports and pivots on setscrews with a 60į point.

I figured that the easiest way to hang onto this casting would be to make a fixture that allowed all machining operations to be done in one set up.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_002.jpg)
Here is the raw casting for the swing arm.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_001.jpg)
The fixture is a button V block and strap clamp indexed in a square collet block.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_003.jpg)
Here is the swing arm casting mounted in the fixture. The fixture was set on the surface plate and the follower shoe pivot housing was indicated to be in the same plane as the center line of the V. this was accomplished by flipping the block over and adjusting the position until the same indicator reading was obtained both ways.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_004.jpg)
The sides of the valve lifter mounting surface are brought to the proper thickness.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_005.jpg)
Standing the block vertical the 3rd face of the valve lifter surface is machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_006.jpg)
Also at this time the length of the follower shoe housing is machined as well as the top end of the arm. This length is measured from the top of the follower shoe housing.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_007.jpg)
Laying the block down with the swing arm upside down; the bottom pivot area is machined flat.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_008.jpg)
The follower shoe housing is centered, spotted, drilled and reamed.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_009.jpg)
The upper and lower pivots are centered and center drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_010.jpg)
The last operation is to machine the round area on the top above where the valve lifter will mount.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Swing_Arm_011.jpg)
Here is the finished swing arm; the pivot hole for that valve lifter needs to be added but not until a few more parts are completed.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 16, 2013, 01:25:12 AM
You made that machining job look easy Dave. That was a nice setup and I enjoyed the photos with all the steps to go with it. Thanks for the education, I will have to remember that setup. The engine is really shaping up nicely and should be beautiful engine when complete.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on February 16, 2013, 01:44:22 AM
That turned out well Dave. Nice fixturing too. The whole engine is amazing!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: metalmad on February 16, 2013, 02:07:02 AM
Hi Dave
I have not seen the button V block before, its Wonderful!
Love your Work!
Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 16, 2013, 02:27:05 AM
So you take some time, build a setup, and it turns out to be a shortcut, saving time, and helps the accuracy of the final product. I wonder if I'm smart enough to follow that lead?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on February 16, 2013, 07:12:11 AM
Very nicely thought out job on the swing arm Dave. That fixture is a winner

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on February 16, 2013, 09:51:35 AM
That fixture made that job easy!   Nicely Done Dave! :praise2: :praise2:


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: black85vette on February 16, 2013, 01:51:14 PM
"The swing arm holds the crossover cam follower shoe and the valve lifter. "

Good thing I don't have to know what the terms mean or do to enjoy seeing the nice work and great setup examples!   I think Zee and I share a inclination to use the word "thingy" a LOT.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 17, 2013, 04:48:53 PM
Thanks for all the kind words guys!

The exhaust valve timing parts of this engine have been an interesting project in its self.  This assembly is one of the things that make the Pacific a rather interesting and unique engine.

So you take some time, build a setup, and it turns out to be a shortcut, saving time, and helps the accuracy of the final product. I wonder if I'm smart enough to follow that lead?

Mosey; I have never been one to enjoy making tools and fixtures but sometimes you just gotta do it. There are a couple of tools I would like to make for the lathe but I just never seem to find the time.

Thanks again,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 17, 2013, 04:53:21 PM
Hi Everyone
I have some old work and some new work to post and it is starting to get confusing to me what to do next. So if some of the dates and order of pictures seem a little strange that is why.
Last time I machined the upper swing arm bracket and swing arm so now we will move the bottom bracket and the cross over cam follower shoe. Eventually it will all come together and make since.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BottomBracket_001.jpg)
As I think that I had said before I also changed the design of the bottom bracket slightly from the blue prints. It was modeled in Alibre and printed 2d in full scale so the position and fit on the body casting could be checked. The model was tweaked to fit the casting as well as get the mounting hardware to fit.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_002.jpg)
Once I was happy with the position and fit; the body casting was skimmed to give the bracket a flat place to sit.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_003.jpg)
Then the mounting holes spotted.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_004.jpg)
Then drilled and tapped.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_005.jpg)
Brass stock for the bracket is faced off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_006.jpg)
Then the profile machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_007.jpg)
After lying the stock down on its side and locating the datum the pivot bolt hole is drilled and tapped.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_008.jpg)
Then the end is rounded over.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_009.jpg)
Flipped the other direction the mounting holes are drilled and the end rounded over.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_010.jpg)
Standing the stock back up in the vise the bracket is sawn from the stock.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_011.jpg)
Almost done!

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_012.jpg)
Testing the fit using a temporary screw.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Bottom_Bracket_013.jpg)
Here is the bracket after some hand work and a trip through the blast cabinet; also the proper hardware has been machined and installed.
Next time the bronze follower shoe.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on February 17, 2013, 06:37:03 PM
This thread is a continual inspiration, both the machine work and the hand work. Do you have any tips to share about how, for example, you get such a nice consistent radius through hand filing?

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 19, 2013, 05:41:33 PM
Thanks Simon

When I do hand work I usually always have my Optivisor on as my eye sight isn't what it use to be. I also have a stereo microscope but usually the Optivisor is adequate.  I always sit down when doing this type of work; you just have more control if you are relaxed and have something to rest your arm on. Small files with safe edges are used even some of my needle files and rifflers have safe  edges.

When the parts allows I will tear narrow strips of sanding cloth from the roll; holding the work in a vise with smooth jaws the sanding cloth is used in a shoe shine fashion to blend edges and outside curves.

One other tool I really like are these sanding sticks from Micro Mark; a different color for each grit (I wrote grit on mine with a sharpie). The 320 and 400 grit belts are much less aggressive than a file and work great for fine detail work.

http://www.micromark.com/micro-sanding-wand-set,7760.html

Also depending on how much material needs to be removed I will use high quality carbide burrs in my Dremel to do the initial shaping.  Also for Iron castings cartridge rolls and a die grinder work great. I purchased the 4690A91 kit from McMaster Carr and for model work will probable last a life time.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#cartridge-sanding-rolls/=ljqtri

One last thing; I find sitting and the bench doing this kind of work very relaxing.

Hope this helps a little,
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 22, 2013, 01:24:06 AM
Hi Everyone

The next step in the valve gear construction is the follower shoe; this was my first trial part I had made last summer. I made a couple extras that I can finish later if needed.

The original shoe was a bronze casting so I decided to make mine one piece instead of a silver soldered assembly.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_001.jpg)
Here the blank has been turned from 660 bronze stock.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_002.jpg)
Then the excess was cut off in the band saw.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_004.jpg)
And the other side.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_005.jpg)
The blank was machined to the proper thickness; here it is standing behind a rapid proto-type test part that I made at work.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_006.jpg)
Here the blank is set up in the mill to machine the first side; I did this at work on my CNC but could easily be made on a manual machine.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_007.jpg)
The first side has been surfaced with a small carbide ball end mill.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_009.jpg)
Working on the second side

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_010.jpg)
Here is the part off of the mill next to one of the prototype parts.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_011.jpg)
Because the shank was left oversize for rigidity a split collet was made to hold the cam so the shank could be turned down.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_012.jpg)
Here is the collet in use.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Shoe_013.jpg)
And finally a group shot with the upper and lower brackets, swing arm, follower shoe and the proper hardware machined and installed on the engine body.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on February 22, 2013, 01:29:10 AM
Beautiful, Dave.
Now I know why I need a collet block, to hold the split collets that I need also.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 22, 2013, 02:18:27 AM
Beautiful bit of work Dave, I am really enjoying following your progress. Learning to make jigs and fixtures is on my list.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 22, 2013, 02:56:29 AM
Very nice Dave.
Educational for me. I've made split collets before. I'd only split through to the center hole. It hadn't occurred to me to slice a bit into the other side. Seems like that would be better.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RonGinger on February 22, 2013, 03:17:13 AM
Dave, can you say a bit about how you take these photos? The quality is just spectacular, I am never able to get such clear shots.

What kind of camera do you have? Are you using a macro setting? Do you use any lights, or reflectors? Is the camera hand held or mounted?

thanks
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: cfellows on February 22, 2013, 04:35:52 AM
I have to agree with Ron.  I kind of take other people's photos for granted, but yours are particularly clear and well lit.  I sure haven't ever been able to get pictures like that.  How do you do that?

Chuck
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: larry1 on February 22, 2013, 05:11:48 AM
Dave, great work  Great jigs and fixtures.         larry
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on February 22, 2013, 12:39:02 PM
Simply amazing stuff Dave, and I agree, the pictures are spectacular !!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 24, 2013, 06:09:37 PM
Hi Guys

Thanks again for all the kind words

Some notes on my photography;

A photographer Iím not; I guess there is a little luck involved here. Because Iím a little on the picky side I usually take many pictures to get the ones that I post. I have been using a Cannon Power Shot SD1200 IS Digital Elph (my wifeís camera) and it does a pretty good job. She gave me a new camera for Christmas because every time she wanted to use here camera it was in the shop. My new camera is a Canon PowerShot Elph 510HS. The new camera has taking some getting used to but seems to be working well for me. Overall I have very happy with the Canon point and shoot cameras.

I also have a newer Cannon Digital at work; it is a PowerShot Elph 310 and it also takes pretty good pictures.

I resize my photos of posting using IrfanView (a free program) before uploading them to Photo Bucket. IrfanView has a sharpen option that I use when re-sizing and re-sampling and it seems to improve the image quality.

As far as lighting; I rarely ever use the flash as it tends to wash everything out and screws up the colors. Sometimes I will play around with the task lamp or work lamp on the machine but that is about it. I dislike dark fuzzy pictures so I work at getting what I post to be good enough to see what is going on.

Thanks again for all the comments,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 14, 2013, 12:33:45 AM
Hi everyone,

I havenít fallen off the face of the earth; things have just been somewhat busy around here and it will probably continue through the spring. Here are some pictures of tidying up a few loose ends on the bottom end with regards to the timing parts.

You may have noticed in that last few pictures of my engine that the main bearing area had some pretty sharp corners. This was because I needed to remove some material from the casting to shift the crossover cam closer to the center line of the engine. I spend a good part of a morning filling and blending in this area.

The crossover cam was also substantially trimmed to get things to come out to my liking. I will go over that later. Hopefully within the next couple of days.

One other thing I didn't cover was when I had the body set up in the mill to fit the upper swing arm bracket; I took a cut across the bottom surface of the bosses as there was quite a bit of extra material in this area. This required some filling and blending to match the machined surfaces with the casting.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_001~0.jpg)
Here is the body after some hand work; notice the top and bottom surfaces on the bosses are now parallel.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Upper_Bracket_002~0.jpg)
This picture shows the fit of the upper swing arm bracket on the bosses.

Here are some shots of the lift cam machining. I made a couple of extras one for my friend who is working on his Pacific and one more just in-case.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_001.jpg)
Staring out the stock is faced.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_002.jpg)
Then Drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_003.jpg)
And bored to size.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_005.jpg)
Then set up in the mill in a V block and indicated in.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_004.jpg)
Both directions.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_006.jpg)
The mounting holes are spotted and drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_007.jpg)
Then the profile machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_008.jpg)
Ready to go back in the lathe.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cam_009.jpg)
The Cams are parted off to the proper length

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/IMG_0118.jpg)
Here are the finished cams.

Next is the machining of the cap for the exhaust valve; not a major accomplishment but one more little piece. I deviated somewhat from the plans (do we see a pattern here?). I have seen some photos of a Pacific engine (maybe it was a Union or Regan as there all related) that had a pleasing dome shape on the top as well as the outer rim of the flange having a nice radius. The flange also overhung the boss on the valve chest slightly. So this is how I decide to make mine.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_001.jpg)
Starting with a piece of 660 bearing bronze (I like the color) it was faced and turned.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_002.jpg)
Then single point threaded 9/16"-18 to match the valve chest.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_003.jpg)
The radius on the rim was hand filed, sanded and polished.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_004.jpg)
Flipped around the stock is brought to length.
I had calculated all the points in my CAD program and a step over and cut approach was used to form the dome.
Here you can see the small lines that need to be sanded out to fully define the shape.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_005.jpg)
Here it is after some blending ready to cut the hex.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_006.jpg)
Set up in the mill and indicated in.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_007.jpg)
The hex is cut.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_008.jpg)
Then returned to the lathe to put the 15 deg. bevel on the hex.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_Cap_009.jpg)
Here it is installed on the valve chest; now I need to make the copper sealing washer to go under it.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on March 14, 2013, 12:43:48 AM
An enjoyable read Dave.
Very nice hand work.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on March 14, 2013, 01:05:01 AM
Thanks for the update Dave...i can relate to having little time lately myself. Hoping you get more time  soon on thin wonderful project.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on March 14, 2013, 02:07:37 AM
Nice work Dave!   Cool way to make a cam!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on March 14, 2013, 10:13:24 PM
Hi Dave, I enjoyed this last post. The little things in making parts add a lot to the finish engine. That was a cool way of making cam lobes also.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 26, 2013, 12:24:56 AM
Hi Everyone
Iím still trying the get caught up with my engine build here; hopefully I will be able to do a better job with this as of now I havenít worked on the engine for a couple of months bit hopefully that will change.

Here are some pictures of finishing and fitting the cross over cam.
The mounting holes in the lift cam were countersunk which as far as I know is how the original was mounted to the crossover cam.  also the square head set screws were machined and casehardened.

The crossover cam was made by Samuel Park at Imperium Tool and Instrument in Butte MT. He has these cams available for Pacific builders. That is unless you have a 4th axis on your CNC or want to design and fab an ingenious machining fixture as Lester did for his engine.

These cams are a nice piece of work, reasonably priced, and the crossover motion is very smooth.
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_001.jpg)
Here is the cam as received; note the extra material on the inside end which can be machined away to adjust the position of the cam on the crank.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_002.jpg)
Here is the cam after removing the proper amount of material for my engine and valve lifter arrangement.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_003.jpg)
As I had indicated before I removed quite a bit of material from the cam and the main bearing housing as well.
This is because I want to have the lift arm more in line with the lift cam (personal preference here); also I will be machining my lift arm from brass stock instead of using the supplied iron casting.

If you look at the pictures of the original engine you can see kind of how the lift arm will look. The one for the model will be slightly different as the model is scaled from a smaller engine.
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_004.jpg)
Checking the fit on the engine; notice the lift cam has been installed with the proper flat head screws and the square head set screws to secure the crossover cam to the crankshaft.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_005.jpg)
Here is a side view showing the engagement of the follower shoe and swing arm.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Cross_Over_Cam_006.jpg)
And here is a view from the back side.

Next I will be the lift arm and bronze shoe that runs on the lift cam to open the exhaust valve.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on May 26, 2013, 06:26:21 AM
Thanks Dave, you now have me puzzling over how that cam was originally made using the equipment of the day  :noidea:

Maybe a profile following tool in the lathe  :shrug:.

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on May 26, 2013, 07:44:33 AM
Dave

Glad to see you back at it.  Your photographic skills are amazing.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on May 26, 2013, 11:28:51 AM
Also glad to see you at it again.
I have the same question as Jo. How were the original cams made?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 26, 2013, 04:32:23 PM
Thanks everyone,

I believe (but I may be wrong) that the original cross over cam had the tracks cast in from the foundry. If this is the case it would have been the art of the pattern maker that created the profile. On the copy of the original print which I have seen; it says that the cross over cam is cast iron. I just not exactly sure how much of it was cast and how much machined.

When Lester made the cam for his original model; he built a fixture that mounted on the mill table. It had a shaft driven by a DC gear motor via roller chain. The shaft (arbor) had the ability to float axially in it's bushings and was spring loaded against a master template via a stylus. He created the master template that was essentially one half of the track. So it basically it was a flat disc with a ramp in one section.

As the arbor was rotated by the gear motor it would move left to right following the master profile. Using a small end mill this would cut one track and 1/2 of the cross; when at final depth the cam blank was reversed and the other track cut which also completed the cross.

I have pictures of it somewhere but I would need to check whit Lester for permission to post them.

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 27, 2013, 01:29:38 AM
Hi Everyone

Here are some photos of machining the valve lifter; I machined most of it on my CNC at work and then finished it up in my shop at home. This was a milestone for me as all the timing parts are now finished and after the exhaust valve is completed and it's seat cut, it will be on to a different part of the engine.

I chose to make this part from scratch and as I have indicated before I made some modifications to change the alignment of these parts. 

I just want to say if anyone is curious, there is nothing wrong with the castings or drawings; this is just something I wanted to try and as I indicated awhile back; if it didnít work I would use the castings machine them to the print.

The valve lifter was designed in a 3d CAD program and printed on one of our rapid prototype machines to check the fit.  Once satisfied the basic shape was programmed and run on the CNC.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_001.jpg)
Here the bottom side of the lifter has been roughed out with a ľĒ ball end mill.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_003.jpg)
Then followed by a 1/8Ē and finally a 1/16Ē ball end mill.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_004.jpg)
Ready for the next operation, made two just in-case.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_005.jpg)
The block is flipped over and the top side is surfaced. The web pieces holding the chucking pieces on are located where the slots will be.
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_006.jpg)
Standing on edge the holes are spotted and drilled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_007.jpg)
Ready for the finishing operations.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_008.jpg)
I needed the bronze shoe so it was made before the lifter was finished. Here a piece of prop shaft (Naval Bronze) was turned and faced and set up in the mill.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_009.jpg)
The profile of the shoe is machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_010.jpg)
Then back in the lathe the shoe is parted off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_011.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_012.jpg)
The first chucking piece is cut off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_013.jpg)
The lifter is set up on a fixture plate, indicated in and clamped down.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_016.jpg)
The shoe slot is milled using the recently completed shoe to check the fit.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_017.jpg)
Back to the saw the other lug is removed.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_018.jpg)
Due to the shape this operation took some creative use of parallels to hang on to it.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_019.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_020.jpg)
Before and after;  cutting the slots was kind of a tedious process mainly because I didnít want to screw up after putting that much work into it.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_021.jpg)
The swing arm is set up and drilled for the pivot bolt.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_022.jpg)
And finally a fit check with the new parts; Iím a happy guy!

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_023.jpg)
Hereís a different view.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Lifter_024.jpg)
Just for grins here is the printed part alongside its machined counterpart. The 3d printer got a workout as I was trying to get a design that I was happy with.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ths on May 27, 2013, 09:34:11 AM
Beautiful Dave, but it is cruelty to many of us. Oh well....

Hugh.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on May 27, 2013, 11:51:49 AM
Incredible work and photographs Dave. I am so looking forward to seeing all this work together in this beautiful engine. The crossover cam alone should be fascinating to watch!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on May 27, 2013, 11:56:24 AM
CNC at work and at home, 3D printing = major tool envy.

Maybe I should consider changing my workplace.  Nah, still love my job.

Great part Dave.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on May 31, 2013, 08:29:00 PM
Wow, some complex parts there Dave! What material did you print the part in? I've only seen videos of plastics printed up until now.  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: peatoluser on May 31, 2013, 10:20:16 PM
beautifully made and beautifully photographed. loving this thread

peter
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 01, 2013, 01:36:01 AM
Thanks for the kind words guys.

Nick the printed part is ABS plastic; I painted it gray as the light colored plastic is hard to get a decent picture of. 

Here are some pictures of making the exhaust valve.

I decided to make a two piece valve using a cast iron head and stainless steel stem; this is the way the valves on some of the old engines were made. Due the length of this valve (over 6Ē) this one was a good candidate.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_001.jpg)
Starting with the chucking lug that was cut off of the valve chest; it was turned, faced, drilled, reamed and parted off.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_002.jpg)
I pressed the valve head onto a 1/8Ē dowel pin to hang on to while facing it to length.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_003.jpg)
Then the top end of the stem hole was opened up with a 60 degree countersink.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_004.jpg)
A piece of precision ground stainless rod is used for the stem. Here it is being turned for the press fit of the head.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_005.jpg)
The head was pressed onto the stem and is ready to be peened.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_006.jpg)
While heating the end of the stem with a torch to a red heat the stem is peened to lock the head on to the stem. There is a piece of steel on the bench under the vise supporting the end of the valve. A few taps with a small ball peen hammer and it is done.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_007.jpg)
After facing the head notice the 60 degree chamfer is now completely full of valve stem. I donít think that head is going anywhere.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_008.jpg)
Next a seat cutter was made; ala George Britnell. I made it with 5 flutes hoping that it would have less chance of chatter.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_011.jpg)
Here it is after heat treating a little cleanup and stoning.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_009.jpg)
The cutter worked great; here is a picture through my microscope (wanted to see if I could do it); the valve seat shows as a dark circle near the edge.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_010.jpg)
Here is another shot with the valve chest tilted a little. You can see the seat better in this picture.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_012.jpg)
After  just a little lapping with extra fine Timesaver compound you can see the contact area on the valve.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Valve_013.jpg)
Here is the completed valve next to the seat cutter.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 01, 2013, 01:51:06 AM
Hi everyone

Here are some pictures of making the exhaust spring and keeper. Iím getting pretty close to being caught up on my build posts. The Pacific sat neglected for the last couple of months due to other comments but I made good progress on the cylinder head this last week and should have pictures posted in the next few days.


(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_001.jpg)
Starting out the spring wire is passed through the tensioner and then through the cross hole in the mandrel.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_002.jpg)
Then the wire is bent over to keep it from pulling out of the mandrel.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_003.jpg)
Starting the winding process; the lathe quick change is set to give the proper number of coils per inch. At first a few close wraps are completed; the lathe carriage is moved by had to keep the coils tight. Then the half nut is engaged and the carriage is moved by the gearing. I usually turn the spindle by hand making sure to keep tension on the wire.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_004.jpg)
When the proper number of coils are wound the half nut is disengaged and a few tight coils are wound at the far end.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_005.jpg)
Then the tension is backed off and the wire cut with some music wire nippers.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_006.jpg)
After the spring is removed from the mandrel the excess coils are cut with the nippers.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_007.jpg)
After the excess coils are removed the ends of the spring are ground flat with the belt sander.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_008.jpg)
The keeper is an easy turning job. Here it is mostly roughed out; a boss was turned to fit in the inside of the spring to help keep it centered on the valve stem.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_009.jpg)
Transferred to the mill the set screw hole is located, drilled and taped.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_010.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_011.jpg)
Here is the spring and keeper mounted on the engine.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on June 01, 2013, 02:01:07 AM
Dave, those are some awesome photos. Thanks for the education, I have gain more knowledge following along with you. Great progress and a beautiful job so far, you must be getting close to completion.

Don
Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on June 01, 2013, 11:04:45 AM
The valves and seats look a perfect seal, great stuff.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ColH on June 01, 2013, 12:56:54 PM
Great work Dave.

Can you post some details of your spring wire tensioner?

Thanks
Col
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Marinus on June 01, 2013, 04:23:38 PM
Wonderful Dave :D

Do you sandblast the brass bits?

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on June 01, 2013, 06:50:51 PM
That is beautiful work Dave!   What kind of lathe do you have?.....Looks Hardinge like...but different..

Dave
Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ths on June 02, 2013, 12:31:02 AM
Very interesting Dave, and yes, the spring tensioner!

Hugh.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 02, 2013, 12:32:35 AM
Thanks guys; I sure appreciate the all the nice comments.


Can you post some details of your spring wire tensioner?

Col;

The spring wire tensioner is a handy little device I made many years ago from plans (if I remember correctly) in one of the Strictly IC Magazines. I did a quick look this evening but I couldnít dig it up.

It has a couple of nice features; the vee supports the mandrel so a center isnít needed unless you want to use one. The tension dial has numbers and a pointer so you can get more consistent results from spring to spring. It usually takes me a few tries or more to get an acceptable spring.

Here are a few pictures; the knurled knob has a screw which pushes on a brass insert. I use a rubber disc in the bottom of the hole so the music wire is compressed between the brass and rubber.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_Winder_001.jpg)
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_Winder_002.jpg)
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Spring_Winder_003.jpg)

Marinus;

Yes some of the brass parts have been bead blasted with a very fine glass bead.

Dave,

The lathe is a Weiler Condor and a real pleasure to use; it was sold off as excess years ago from my employer and I was able to purchase it from the local machinery dealer who purchased all the equipment. It went from the loading dock at work straight to my shop.


Thanks again guys.

Title: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ths on June 02, 2013, 12:58:59 AM
Hemingway have a similar spring winder here,

http://www.hemingwaykits.com/acatalog/Universal_Spring_Winder.html


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 02, 2013, 01:30:04 AM
Hi everyone,

A couple of weeks ago I got the head studs and nuts machined; the length of the studs will be adjusted after the head is complete and the gasket made.

The prints indicated using high crown bolts but all the pictures I have seen of the original engines used studs and nuts so that is what I chose to use on my engine.

Iím not going to go into any detail just a couple of quick photos of the finished product.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Studs_2.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Studs_3.jpg)

Except for the head which I have been working on this last week (and will have an update in the next day or so) this brings me up to the current progress level of the engine

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on June 02, 2013, 07:10:10 AM

The spring wire tensioner is a handy little device I made many years ago from plans (if I remember correctly) in one of the Strictly IC Magazines. I did a quick look this evening but I couldnít dig it up.

You can find the article in Issue 34 on page 5 of Strictly IC.

Looking forward to the construction of the head 8)

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 03, 2013, 11:35:02 PM
Hi everyone,

Jo thanks for looking up the spring wire tension tool.

Well I have finally been able to spend some quality shop time on the Pacific. Within the last week I was able to finish up the cylinder head; another little milestone in its construction.

As I had indicated earlier the internal design was altered somewhat to keep from having to drill and plug holes in the side of the head. I created a cavity which would have been more like the original cored water jacket. This way the holes that connect to the ports on the top surface of the cylinder open directly into the water jacket cavity; Iím happy with the way it turned out.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_002.jpg)
Here are the castings after machining the chucking lugs.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_004.jpg)
Starting with the upper casting the top surface is profiled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_005.jpg)
I created a 2D sketch of the curved profile and put in an intersection point every .0025Ē. These dimensions were entered into an Excel Spread sheet that could be printed and used at the lathe. The dome is a little more than Ĺ done here.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_006a.jpg)
Here is a sample of one of the 3 pages of coordinates used to create the upper curve.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_007.jpg)
After some careful filing and sanding Iím quite please with the result.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_013.jpg)
After the top surface was finished soft jaws were bored and the upper casting flipped around to work on the underside.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_014.jpg)
The chucking lug is cut off and the head machined to the proper thickness.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_015.jpg)
The head is counter bored both for cylinder clearance and the register for the lower casting.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_016.jpg)
Using a pair of soft jaws in the milling vise the next part of the cavity is machined; notice the one boss that is a little extra big. This is where the outlet port will pass through and the inlet ports will fall between two of the bosses on the opposite side.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_017.jpg)


(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_018.jpg)
Back in the lathe the internal dome is machined using the same method as on the top.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_008.jpg)
Starting on the lower casting the baffles are turned to be a slip fit in the cylinder and the larger OD is turned to press into the upper casting.


(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_010.jpg)
Transferred to the mill and indicated in; the bolt circle is drilled along with the two water ports.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_011.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_012.jpg)
The lower casting is parted from the chucking lug using an insert type parting tool.  Just a little bit of work on a lapping plate removed the tool marks and left a nice flat surface.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_020.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_019.jpg)
Here are the upper and lower castings ready for assembly.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_023.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_022.jpg)
And after they have been assembled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_024.jpg)
One more detail to take care of is drilling and tapping the water outlet port.  The port is at a 45 deg. angle; so the head was dialed in and the spin indexer used to set the angle.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Head_025.jpg)

Here is the finished head installed on the engine; Iím really pleased how it turned out.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave





Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on June 04, 2013, 01:39:29 AM
That is brilliant work Dave.  I can see that I need to go back to doing electrical work. Good job on the head.
 :praise2: :praise2:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on June 04, 2013, 02:21:51 PM
It's a privilege and a pleasure to see Dave's work, and shows me what I am hoping to achieve someday. Thanks, Dave, please keep showing us your work.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on June 04, 2013, 02:37:38 PM
Here is the finished head installed on the engine; Iím really pleased how it turned out.

Dave

I should think you would be it looks fantastic  :ThumbsUp:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on June 04, 2013, 02:52:20 PM
Great work Dave. :praise2: :praise2:

Really enjoyed the step-by-step progress report.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 05, 2013, 01:20:27 AM
Hi Everyone

Thanks of all the great feedback I really appreciate it.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 12, 2013, 03:00:18 AM


Hi everyone,

I have been able to make some progress on the piston this week;  so far all is going well but is was a bit of a challenge to get it dialed in.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_001_zps6c6d4c24.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_001_zps6c6d4c24.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the raw aluminum casting.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_002_zps1f9c3589.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_002_zps1f9c3589.jpg.html)
And a view of the inside.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_003_zps5ea244b3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_003_zps5ea244b3.jpg.html)
The casting was chucked in the small 3 jaw chuck and tapped around to get it running true. After it was running about as good as I could get it the chucking lug was machined.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_005_zps7aaeca1b.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_005_zps7aaeca1b.jpg.html)
After the chucking lug was machined the piston was flipped around and chucked in my baby Sherline 5C 4 jaw chuck.  This is a sweet little chuck for small work.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_004_zpsdd220ded.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_004_zpsdd220ded.jpg.html)
The inside of the piston was indicated in. first I centered the inside of the wrist pin bosses then centered the inside of the skirt 90 degrees to  the pin bosses. A lot of checking here but I finally got it to a point I was comfortable with.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_006_zps97164ba4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_006_zps97164ba4.jpg.html)
The outside was rough turned leaving about .005 to remove later.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_007_zps5e35dd32.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_007_zps5e35dd32.jpg.html)
The inside of the skirt was turned along with facing the bosses where the wrist pin set screw jam nuts will seat.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_008_zps119d6805.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_008_zps119d6805.jpg.html)
 The piston was flipped around and the chucking lug turned true with the piston body. A size was chosen that would fit in a standard collet (25/32Ē) which is about where it cleaned up.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_009_zps661f9be9.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_009_zps661f9be9.jpg.html)
The piston now put in the indexing fixture; using an adjustable parallel and precision to square the pin bosses . This indexer can pivot 90 degrees so the plan is to mill the inside surfaces of the pin bosses then rotate the piston down to drill and ream the wrist pin hole.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_010_zpsd6d370e4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_010_zpsd6d370e4.jpg.html)
The bottom of the piston is indicated in; also with the piston horizontal the indexer was indicated parallel with the X axis.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_011_zpse0db6be5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_011_zpse0db6be5.jpg.html)

The inside surfaces of the pin bosses have been milled to .750Ē and the set screw hole spotted just for a sanity check. I will probably drill and ream the pin hole first then rotate it back up and do the drilling and tapping for the set screws.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on June 12, 2013, 05:35:57 AM
Good going Dave.

Vimce
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ColH on June 22, 2013, 11:42:06 PM
Thanks for providing the detail on the spring tensioner Dave. 

Apologies for the delayed response but have been moving house.

Your quality of work is to be envied. Something to aspire to once I get  my workshop fitted out.

Col
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on June 23, 2013, 10:46:41 AM
Great set up and progress shots Dave.....Lots of great info!

Beautiful work! :cheers:

Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 23, 2013, 04:56:12 PM
Thanks guys,

Work on the piston stalled as I need to hone the cylinder before I can finish it. A friend and customer of mine owns and runs an automotive machine shop; he has the cylinder and will hone it for me on the Sunnen hone.

I got started on the big end brasses yesterday so I should have an update in a day or so.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 09, 2013, 01:09:30 AM
Hi Everyone

I got my cylinder back from my friend who honed it on his Sunnen hone; it came out beautifully and dead on the 1.750 diameter.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_012_zpsafaae394.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_012_zpsafaae394.jpg.html)
Continuing work on the piston the indexing head is rotated down to the horizontal position and indicated in.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_013_zpsf2d43463.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_013_zpsf2d43463.jpg.html)
The wristpin hole is now spotted, drilled and reamed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_014_zps5eefb473.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_014_zps5eefb473.jpg.html)
The indexer is rotated back up and the wristpin retainer screw holes are drilled and tapped. I didnít want to run the reamer across the holes so that is why I seem to be jumping back and forth.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_017_zps2c52dced.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_017_zps2c52dced.jpg.html)
Back in the lathe chucking lug has been cut off and the top of the piston finished; the threaded hole is for the post that works the piston trip ignitor.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_018_zps210ac8f1.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_018_zps210ac8f1.jpg.html)
A mandrill was turned that is a very light push fit on the ID of the piston skirt.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_019_zps54f3d34d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_019_zps54f3d34d.jpg.html)
With the piston installed on the mandrill and the center in place the piston is turned to its final size.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_020_zps9379e8c8.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_020_zps9379e8c8.jpg.html)
Without disturbing the setup the ring grooves are cut using a Thinbit; the rings are .062Ēwide. Also but not shown I cut 3 .03Ē X .01Ē deep oil grooves in the skirt area. Being a vertical engine Iím hoping this may retain some of the oil and help keep it lubed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_023_zpscb7a14bb.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_023_zpscb7a14bb.jpg.html)
I didnít take any pictures of the construction but here is the wrist pin and square head set screws. Both the pin and screws have been case hardened.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_021_zps703b28d4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_021_zps703b28d4.jpg.html)
And finally a couple shots of the completed piston with the hardware installed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_022_zps70b97491.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Piston_022_zps70b97491.jpg.html)

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on July 09, 2013, 04:36:16 AM
Nice work Dave.  I guess you are close to finishing the engine. What's left?

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on July 09, 2013, 05:36:26 AM
Looks good! Is it normal to hone the cylinder before cutting the wristpin hold and the ring grooves? I guess you just had to be careful not to leave any raised bits?

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on July 09, 2013, 07:30:36 AM
Grooves & hole are in the piston not the cylinder.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 09, 2013, 07:53:52 AM
Nice work Dave, I am curious about using square head sets crews to hold the wrist pin in place. Is this better and as secure as using E-Clips on the ends? Do they get loctite in place or just the jam nut? Since I have never built an IC engine just wondering how well this works.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on July 09, 2013, 08:13:46 AM
Common practice on the original engines of the period and thats whats being replicated, some also had extended screws so you could get at the heads if the skirt was long. Plus the pin won't wear the piston as the only movement is between pin and little end.

Also can't see how you could get an e-clip on the end of a pin, you may be able to use circlips on larger engines fitting into grooves in the piston or more common on our small engines is a bronze or teflon button on the pin ends to stop it rubbing the cylinder
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on July 09, 2013, 08:34:18 AM
Wow, it looks amazing - just like the real thing  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 09, 2013, 04:01:09 PM
Common practice on the original engines of the period and thats whats being replicated, some also had extended screws so you could get at the heads if the skirt was long. Plus the pin won't wear the piston as the only movement is between pin and little end.

Also can't see how you could get an e-clip on the end of a pin, you may be able to use circlips on larger engines fitting into grooves in the piston or more common on our small engines is a bronze or teflon button on the pin ends to stop it rubbing the cylinder
Thanks Jason, you have answered my question. I was thinking of the E-Clip been inside the piston sides not on the pin. But I can see if the piston is small it would not be feasible.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on July 09, 2013, 04:23:30 PM
I really like that indexing head Dave!

Nice work on the piston!....

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on July 09, 2013, 04:52:51 PM
Grooves & hole are in the piston not the cylinder.
Ooops, of course! I was confused by the proximity of that paragraph to the picture of the nicely finished piston underneath it!

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 09, 2013, 05:55:51 PM
Thanks for the interest and kind words guys,

Vince; I have come a long way but there is still much work to do. After the piston and rod are finished it will be on to the intake side of the project. This will involve carving an intake valve chest from solid along with making the valve, valve chest cap, and bob weight.

I have 3 beautiful investment castings from Morrison and Marvin for the gas and air cocks; they will need to be machined and finished along with the piping to connect them to the engine

I have been doing some mods to the engine base and will detail those at a later date.

All the piston trip ignitor parts need to be made and the cylinder machined to accept them. This may get it running but then there is all the finish work, cooling system etc. to design and make.

I donít work very fast but hoping to have it running later this year; completely finished only time will tell.

Simon; I may not have been very clear and the pictures didnít show it. But the reason I waited for the cylinder is because I had left the piston a few thou oversized and wanted to know what size the cylinder finished at so the piston could be machined for the proper clearance.

I think Jason answered most of the other questions; thanks Jason.

I also got the rod finished last weekend and will try to get some pictures of its construction sometime this week.

Thanks again
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 09, 2013, 06:26:56 PM

Thanks  Dave

The indexing head is a sweetheart; Kalamazoo I believe; it is very well made and the tilting feature makes it handy for some things, it is also very rigid. I picked it up used at our local used machinery dealer. I purchased a new tail stock for it from Kalamazoo through our local dealer and it was an absolute piece of junk from points Far East; it got sent back.

I started watching eBay and it wasnít too long before I found a nice used one only this one was US made and matches the quality of the indexer.

This sad thing is Kalamazoo who used to make pretty darn good stuff now outsources at least some of their tooling to Asia.
I have one of their 2Ē X 48Ē belt sanders and it is a well-made tool; I guess going forward I would ask the country of origin before paying a premium price just for name sake.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on July 09, 2013, 06:34:05 PM
Dave, I have to say you are a Picasso in the machining department and an Ansel Adams in the photography of his work. Just beautiful. I'll be here till it runs, even if it's after the cows come home. :ThumbsUp:

Yo Redneck,
Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on July 09, 2013, 08:47:58 PM
Beautiful work Dave!!  Thanks for these latest updates, I always look forward to seeing more on this engine.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: gbritnell on July 10, 2013, 12:30:52 AM
Hi Dave,
I'm sorry I haven't been keeping up with your build. I just went back and started from the beginning. I must say it's great stuff. The photo coverage is first rate, well along with the build also. I sure miss my days in the shop with the CNC equipment but it looks like you're putting it to good use.
gbritnell
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 10, 2013, 01:23:16 AM
Eric, Bill and George

Thanks guys for the kind words I appreciate it.

George; I do enjoy the CNC work along with the solid modeling and CAM; although the CAM software is just a necessary evil to get parts made and can be a real test of patience sometimes.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: MuellerNick on July 10, 2013, 11:11:06 AM
Quote
These dimensions were entered into an Excel Spread sheet that could be printed and used at the lathe. The dome is a little more than Ĺ done here.


So your lathe has BNC. Not to confuse with CNC! BNC is Biological Numeric Control.  :ROFL:
Nice pieces of work!




Nick
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 11, 2013, 12:39:07 AM
Why yes; what Nick said, "BNC" I like that  :cheers:

Thanks for the kind words Nick.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on July 11, 2013, 11:56:38 AM

Thanks  Dave

The indexing head is a sweetheart; Kalamazoo I believe; it is very well made and the tilting feature makes it handy for some things, it is also very rigid. I picked it up used at our local used machinery dealer. I purchased a new tail stock for it from Kalamazoo through our local dealer and it was an absolute piece of junk from points Far East; it got sent back.

I started watching eBay and it wasnít too long before I found a nice used one only this one was US made and matches the quality of the indexer.

This sad thing is Kalamazoo who used to make pretty darn good stuff now outsources at least some of their tooling to Asia.
I have one of their 2Ē X 48Ē belt sanders and it is a well-made tool; I guess going forward I would ask the country of origin before paying a premium price just for name sake.

Dave

Thanks for that Dave....would love to have one of those in 3C...!

But not junk!...good stuff....

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 17, 2013, 02:03:11 AM
Hi Everyone

Here are some construction photos of the Pacific rod; the rod has brasses on each end with a turned steel center. I wonder if this is a hold out from the steam engine designs; the split small end bearing isnít something you see very often on an IC engine.
I accidently deleted the construction of the brasses and didnít take any of the hardware machining. The brasses were left a little oversize on the radius so they could be turned as a unit assembled on the rod. I roughed them out on the CNC so that is how I originally generated the radius.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_002_zpsaf46c57d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_002_zpsaf46c57d.jpg.html)
First a suitable piece of 12L14 stock was faced to length and centered on both ends.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_003_zpsa6b85823.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_003_zpsa6b85823.jpg.html)
Then the center was machined just a little larger than the finished fat part in the middle of the rod.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_004_zps2d241cf3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_004_zps2d241cf3.jpg.html)
Using a V block the profile on each end of the rod was machined leaving the radius on the ends a few thou over for turning later; also at this time the holes were drilled.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_005_zpsea6bd682.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_005_zpsea6bd682.jpg.html)
Here the 1/16Ē hole is drilled all the way to the middle of the rod for oiling; it gets an intersecting hole put in later.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_006_zpsa554408b.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_006_zpsa554408b.jpg.html)
Back in the lathe and indicated in using a 4 jaw chuck the first taper is machined and the radius at the root is also cut with the same tool.
You may notice that in the next few pictures the radius at the root is smaller; that is because I goofed and made it too large the first time. I re-ground the tool and went back and re-cut them.
Not shown the rod is flipped and the same was done for the other end.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_007_zps3ec11eb7.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_007_zps3ec11eb7.jpg.html)
Turning the radius on the sides was a bit of a challenge; the radius is not centered with the rod axis so the rod assembly needed to be offset for turning.
A fixture was made the mount the rod assembly to with the proper offset; two sets of mounting holes were included. One set for each end of the rod.
First the big end is done; first one side the rod is removed and rotated and then the other side is turned. Two pair of special stepped studs were made as the one end of each of the brasses is threaded so a thread size that would slide through the threaded hole was chosen.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_008_zps8ab99c2d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_008_zps8ab99c2d.jpg.html)
First the big end is done; first one side the rod is removed and rotated and then the other side is turned. Two pair of special stepped studs were made as the one end of each of the brasses is threaded so a thread size that would slide through the threaded hole was chosen.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_009_zps1ce7518b.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_009_zps1ce7518b.jpg.html)
And after the first side is completed; you can see part of the fixture was machined away so the tool would clear the end of the bearing.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_013_zpsd1446a22.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_013_zpsd1446a22.jpg.html)
The completed piston and rod assembly with the proper hardware


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_012_zps8632a898.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Rod_012_zps8632a898.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the inside.
I need to do a thorough cleaning of the cylinder then I can do a test fit of the new parts.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on July 17, 2013, 02:52:23 AM
Beautiful work as always, Dave. I like your offset fixtures to get the radii.

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 17, 2013, 04:17:26 AM
Beautiful work as always, Dave. I like your offset fixtures to get the radii.

Simon
Like Simon said Dave, beautiful work and photos.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on July 17, 2013, 04:20:41 AM
Your work is always georgous Dave!
 :praise2:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on July 17, 2013, 08:05:38 AM
That is really nice Dave,

never seen that oil hole down the middle before - good idea that.

I am used to, on locos at least seeing a steel cap on the other side of the big end - is this an i.c. thing that it is omitted?

Nick
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 17, 2013, 09:11:19 AM
Hi Dave, I noticed your V block and was wondering where you purchased this multi position block. I would like to have a set like it. The set I have is limited.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on July 17, 2013, 12:05:40 PM
Lovely work as always Dave...and the pictures are still perfect!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 18, 2013, 01:00:07 AM
Thanks for all the kind words guys as always it is much appreciated.

Nick; the hole down the center of the rod is exactly how the original engine was made. Some builders have added a grease cup here but to keep with the original design I went with only the small hole. I'm hoping a squirt with the oil can once and a while will suffice.

As far as the steel end plate goes; like the oil hole this is just the way the original was made. I don't know that I have ever seen the steel plate on a stationary engine. Maybe because the bulk of the force is pushing from the piston down to the crank; where on a steam engine the force is the same in both directions. Therefore the bottom half of the bearing also needs support.

Don; the V block and clamp is a Starrett #568 they are sold as singles as far as I know; I do have a smaller pair of Starrett V blocks that are matched. This is the one I use the most. It is nice that the clamp is inside of the block so if you have it clamped in a milling vice you can remove the clamp with out disturbing your setup. 

Thanks again guys,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on July 18, 2013, 01:59:39 PM
Dave, good point I didn't think about the force although all the force will mainly be putting tension in the bolts. Could be as you say just to stop them pulling into the softer bronze.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 14, 2013, 01:00:57 AM
Hi Everyone

I had a few modifications that I wanted to do the the engine base before I started on the ignitor and intake valve chest. To facilitate casting and to have a place for the core print there was a large hole in the top of the base. This would allow the waste oil to drain down through the base and on to the skid.

The base needed to be sealed up and a proper drain put in; as far as I know this is the way the original engines were. I have seen several different locations for the drain in photos and I chose to run it out the side as seen on a Pacific/Union marine engine.

Also bosses were added for the mounting bolts as well as a boss for the intake air pipe to pass through.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Base_1_zps122359e3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Base_1_zps122359e3.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the base casting showing the cored hole.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_002_zps117705a2.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_002_zps117705a2.jpg.html)
A piece of ĹĒ hot rolled steel was rescued from the scrap box .

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_003_zpsde57d26d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_003_zpsde57d26d.jpg.html)
The top side of the new oil pan is machined along with the outer profile.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_004_zps3a66d876.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_004_zps3a66d876.jpg.html)
The base was set up in the mill and a matching pocket cut to hold the new oil pan.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_005_zpse03fc93c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_005_zpse03fc93c.jpg.html)
The oil pan was a light tap in fit and glued in place using Loctite anaerobic gasket sealer. It was left about .01Ē proud and faced off after the adhesive curred.

(http://i1236.photobuck
et.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_006_zps4b00b1fb.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_006_zps4b00b1fb.jpg.html)
And a shot from the bottom.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_007_zpsab62f7a9.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_007_zpsab62f7a9.jpg.html)
After taking a skim cut with a fly cutter it is now nice and flat.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_008_zps2d8af38c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_008_zps2d8af38c.jpg.html)
Set up in the mill the base is counter bored for the new boss.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_009_zps0363bb7e.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_009_zps0363bb7e.jpg.html)
Using a ľĒ ball end mill the oil drain is connected to the pan area.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_010_zps5ec30f7a.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_010_zps5ec30f7a.jpg.html)
Here the new boss has been installed and taped for the drain pipe. Also a little blending work has been done with Devcon steel filled epoxy.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_011_zps43c0ae65.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_011_zps43c0ae65.jpg.html)
The bosses were turned from cast iron bar stock.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_012_zps175be9aa.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_012_zps175be9aa.jpg.html)
The holes in the base were machined to accommodate the new bosses.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_013_zps24b2b35b.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_013_zps24b2b35b.jpg.html)
Then they were Loctited in place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_014_zpsfaf0e9b8.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BaseMods_014_zpsfaf0e9b8.jpg.html)
And finally a shot of the new air intake boss along with the new mounting bosses after a little body work with the Devcon.

Now on the to the piston trip ignitor, :cartwheel:

Thanks for checking in.
Dave



Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on August 14, 2013, 01:16:47 AM
She's looking good Dave, and like always your work is superb. Nice to see some more progress on it though. That is a beautiful looking engine Dave and I will be glad when I can attempt one like that.  :ThumbsUp:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on August 14, 2013, 07:50:43 AM
Dave,

Looking at your excellent bit of machining to cut that plate to size can I assume that you are using CNC?  If I had done it on my mill I would have looked to cut most of the central area out square to the mill's bed then used the DRO's radi function to turn the curves on the inner and outer edge. I guess that it would have been just as easy to mill the curves using a rotary table, but I still have to be brave enough to learn how to use that  :ShakeHead:.

And  :headscratch: I must ask what is that piece of bent steel hiding under the plate in the second photo?

BTW: Thanks for showing a picture of a ruler with the base. It is handy for those of us following along to be reminded the size of other engines from time to time  ;).

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Stuart on August 14, 2013, 08:19:23 AM
Jo I think its a bit of spring steel like a hair grip in reverse to hold the parallels out to the vice jaws .

I whole hardly endorse your comment with ref to a rule ( scale for the US ) to be included in photos as we all build in different scales sizes it help to visualise the model

Dave that is some seriously good work you have done on this project , make my work look like I have machined it wit a rust nail for a cutter


look forward to see it when it is completed

Stuart
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on August 14, 2013, 01:07:00 PM
Amazing work Dave. Those castings look to be really high quality as well...the crisp cast in lettering, etc., and not just on the base but on all the castings shown throughout the build. Still following along and looking forward to more!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 15, 2013, 07:29:14 PM
Thanks of all the kind words guys.

Jo, Stuart is correct; that is a parallel keeper that I purchased years ago from Rutland, a tool supplier here in states.

When you use the radius feature of your DRO can you control the scallop size (the little bump left between the cuts)? I program and run a NC sheet metal punch at work and it has the ability to nibble which I guess would be about the same a the arc feature of your DRO. Typically the scallop size we use is .002" on radius cuts.

Thanks again,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on August 15, 2013, 08:52:05 PM
Yes the scallop size is fully programmable as one of the inputs. but when you are manually doing each X/Y location it can get tedious  :-\ so using as large a cutter as you can get away with means you can use a larger scallop measurement.

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 09, 2013, 11:24:26 PM
Hi everyone

I was able to spend some time late last month and got the engraving done on the Lunkenheimer grease cups. Armed with a new spring-loaded diamond engraver from 2L and some encouragement from Gary Hart, I gave it a try.

The geometry was created in Solid Works using a photo of the original as a drawing template; then on to the CAM program to create the tool path.
After a few test cuts I had the feed and speed pretty well dialed in; Iím pleased how good they came out. Because the diamond displaces the material instead of cutting it the bumps needed to be carefully sanded off.

The letters are approximately .03Ē tall and ended up being about .005Ē deep.

Here are a few pictures, one showing the original I used as a pattern.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0511_zpsc590a7af.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0511_zpsc590a7af.jpg.html)
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0545_small_zpsb4f83422.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0545_small_zpsb4f83422.jpg.html)
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0548_small_zps436176b3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/IMG_0548_small_zps436176b3.jpg.html)

This was a fun little task and I already have an idea where I will use it next.


Thanks for checking in,
Dave




Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 10, 2013, 01:29:43 AM
Beautiful work Dave and glad to see you get some time in.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on September 10, 2013, 05:47:38 AM
Very nice  :ThumbsUp: That is one thing that Soild Works will allow you to draw that Alibre won't  :(

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on September 10, 2013, 07:26:35 AM
Excellent Dave, the black paint is a nice touch too

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 10, 2013, 02:25:47 PM
That is sweeeeet Dave. Looks every bit like the original and will make a fine detail addition to an already beautiful model !!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on September 10, 2013, 07:20:20 PM
Amazing Dave.

To get the black lettering, did you paint the engraving and then sand the excess away?

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: metalmad on September 12, 2013, 11:47:42 PM
Hi Dave
Every time I look at your work, I wonder just how you get your amazing finish!  :praise2: :praise2:
Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 16, 2013, 12:24:18 AM
Thanks for the comments everyone and also checking in on my slow progress.

Vince; sorry I forgot to answer your question. The black in the letters is not paint it is a product from Birchwood Casey CO. called brass black. It is a thin watery chemical that was applied to the letters with a cotton swab then rinsed with water.  The top was sanded in the lathe with 800 grit to remove the excess black around the letters.

Thanks again,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 16, 2013, 03:02:23 AM
Hi Everyone
I finally was able to carve out some time to work on the piston trip ignitor.  The cylinder casting had bosses cast for the feed throughs; but the way my cylinder finished up I wasnít completely happy with the position of the boss relative to where the holes should be.

My original plan was to completely remove the boss and counter bore the cylinder to create a flat area for the insulator to sit. I actually did this but then wasnít overly happy with the way it looked. Part of the reason was I sized the counter bore to fit some mica washers I had on hand; and after the fact the scale just wasnít correct. So after thinking about it for a few days I decided to go ahead and replace the bosses.

 The new bosses were turned and then pressed and Loctited into the counter bore. A small fillet was added with the Devcon and I was starting to feel better about how it was all looking.  I have seen these engines both ways (with the counter bore and also with the boss) so I would say either way could be correct.

The Devcon I have been using is called Plastic Steel Putty (A) it is a steel reinforced epoxy; the mix ratio is 9:1 by weight or 2.5:1 by volume. This gives you some idea of the amount of steel filler that it has in it. It is not cheap but a much better product than JB Weld types of epoxies.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_001_zps8322ee2a.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_001_zps8322ee2a.jpg.html)
Here are the two new ignitor bosses.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_002_zpsf74e3c6e.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_002_zpsf74e3c6e.jpg.html)
And a close-up shot.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_003_zps5fccc422.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_003_zps5fccc422.jpg.html)
I decided to counter bore the inside of the cylinder for the mica to sit in; as far as I know this is also how the original engine was done. I modified a standard counter bore (cut off) so it would fit in the cylinder bore.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_004_zps27e2413d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_004_zps27e2413d.jpg.html)
Teflon insulator bushings were turned along with the start of the feed throughs; the feed throughs were made form 303 stainless steel. 

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_005_zps827637bb.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_005_zps827637bb.jpg.html)
The feed through is milled half way to form the clamp area for the blade.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_006_zps53bc4892.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_006_zps53bc4892.jpg.html)
Then drilled and tapped; also the edge is given a small radius to remove a stress point from the blade.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_007_zps8acdab37.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_007_zps8acdab37.jpg.html)
The clamp blocks are machined and counter bored to accept a boss for the clamp screw.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_008_zps3a5e8de8.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_008_zps3a5e8de8.jpg.html)
The bosses are silver soldered in place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_009_zpse7907940.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_009_zpse7907940.jpg.html)
Here they are after cleaning and a trip through the blast cabinet.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_010_zpse28afc1c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_010_zpse28afc1c.jpg.html)
The blades are machined out of a commercial air compressor valve spring; the spring just happened to be the right thickness. The stock is screwed to a chucking piece and the clamps removed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_011_zps1e3c664f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_011_zps1e3c664f.jpg.html)
The blades are profiled using a small carbide end mill.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_012_zpscff43214.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_012_zpscff43214.jpg.html)
Here they are ready for the points to be installed; also made a couple of spares while I was set up and going.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_014_zpsa51b9bc4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_014_zpsa51b9bc4.jpg.html)
The points were machined out of meteor metal that I purchased from one of the magneto guys a number of years ago. I think that it is high in Nickel but not sure what else is in it. I plan to take a sample to work and have one of the guys in the lab check it out.

I may also try German silver point material as this is what one of the gas engine suppliers is selling for Ignitor point replacements in the full sized antique engines
The points were swagged in place after machining.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_015_zps2aed0b1c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_015_zps2aed0b1c.jpg.html)
Here is the lineup of all the parts for one feed through assembly. The mica washers are added or removed to properly align the points. The outside insulator is made from linen phenolic followed by a thin washer punched from some blue spring steel and then the brass nut/ wire clamp.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_016_zps0d46b6f1.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_016_zps0d46b6f1.jpg.html)
Here are all the parts installed in the cylinder; notice the brass button screwed into the top of the piston.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_017_zps6abed079.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_017_zps6abed079.jpg.html)
Here is a shot through the exhaust port; the button on the piston closes the points on the way up and then the point open as the piston starts back down.
Because room is tight all fine adjustments will be made using shims; either under the trip button or under the blades. I lengthened my connecting rod to increase the compression ratio so there is not enough room for the stud and jam nut that would have originally been used on the top of the piston.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_020_zps5ba9e56f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_020_zps5ba9e56f.jpg.html)
Here are a couple shots of the outside parts.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_021_zps95b1da56.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Ignitor_021_zps95b1da56.jpg.html)
The major problem with this system is there is no spark advance; the engine will always runs in a retarded condition. It was 1890 after all and this engine represents some of the very early US engine development.


Thanks for checking in.
Dave 


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 16, 2013, 03:34:07 AM
Dave those beers must of helped you a lot getting the igniter setup. You have done a jam up job of it. Nice work bud.  :cheers:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on September 16, 2013, 05:00:27 AM
Amazingly professional-looking work as always, Dave. It's going to be a real pleasure to watch this one run.

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on September 16, 2013, 07:39:50 AM
Looking good Dave. I've just done the ignitor on the Galloway and used a Tungsten Tig Electrode for the contacts.

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 17, 2013, 01:26:05 AM
Thanks guys I appreciate the comments.

Jason I know there are a lot of guys using tungsten for ignitor points; and it does seem to work quite well. My buddy here in in my town has used it in several of his ignitor engines with good results.

I have wondered about the material choice for the points for some time; the material used in the antique engines (which I have several of) is not hard like tungsten. It is relatively soft and easy to file. The meteor metal that I used (probably nickel and Iron) was supposed to replicate the material used in the early engines. 

Recently my buddy purchased a ready made set of points (for a big engine) from one of the US antique engine parts suppliers and he turned them down and put them in his Red Devil engine that he is working on. I took a shaving of this material to work and had it analyzed and it turned out to be Nickel Silver (German Silver) 60% copper 20% nickel and 20% tin. This seems me to this would be an excellent ignitor contact.

To me based on no scientific fact; a softer material would produce a hotter fatter spark than a super hard material like tungsten. It would be interesting to hear the thoughts of someone smarter than me on this subject.

I would still like to (and probably will) try the German silver in the Pacific. Silver soldering points onto the blades I'm sure would remove all the temper from the spring steel; I guess you may be able to use a heat sink on them. My buddy who also built a Pacific (and his is running) used points out of a commercial relay; I keep telling him that those points are designed Not To Arc! Arcing in a relay is not a desirable thing. His engine does run and runs quite well.  He may try something different down the road; but I think he is waiting to see how I make out.

OK I have rambled on enough but if anyone has any thoughts on the subject I would like to hear them.

Thanks again guys,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on October 02, 2013, 05:10:23 PM
Looking superb as always, great machining.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on October 05, 2013, 01:50:44 PM
Wow, I'm not sure I want to speak to this subject, but I have an experience to share. I spoldered a tungsten bit from a motorcycle points set into my Upshur farm engine. It doesn't work very well, as it erodes quite quickly. Dick Upshur worked it over for me and said "Get some good points in there". What to think?
Mosey   :noidea: :headscratch:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on October 28, 2013, 12:47:39 AM
Hi everyone

I have been struggling trying to get an update posted on the Pacific; I havenít been able to make much progress lately but hopefully that will change.

The next part on the engine is the intake valve assembly; there isnít anything in the way of plans or a casting for this part. Only some guidelines form Lester Bowman on the prints of what he did on his model.

Some of the guys that have built this engine use a modified check valve for the intake valve chest with good results.

Roland Morrison (Morrison & Marvin) supplies a nice set of lost wax castings for the fuel and air cocks that are designed for 1/6Ē pipe and are a real nice fit on the Pacific.

Using the size of the hand valves to go by and looking at photos and drawings of the original engines I designed an intake valve assembly that I feel complements the hand valves and fits the scale of the engine nicely.

 This valve could have been made as a built up assembly but I chose to carve it from solid stock using CNC.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_001_zps4ec1422c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_001_zps4ec1422c.jpg.html)
Here is my Alibre (Geomagic) assembly drawing of the valve.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_002_zps79a3ac79.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_002_zps79a3ac79.jpg.html)
Starting out the first side is roughed out.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_003_zpsab76ff31.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_003_zpsab76ff31.jpg.html)
Here the finish tool path is running on the first side of the valve body.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_004_zps54669748.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_004_zps54669748.jpg.html)
The first side finished.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_005_zps3c00c559.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_005_zps3c00c559.jpg.html)
The block is flipped over and the second side roughed out.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_006_zps3479a789.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_006_zps3479a789.jpg.html)
After finishing the  second side the valve body is ready for some secondary machining operations.
More to follow.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave




Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on October 28, 2013, 06:23:23 AM
Hi Dave,
Thanks for posting the construction pics!  That's pretty neat to see what it looks like while being carved out.

I saw this piece at the GEARS show a few weeks ago, and i can tell you, it looks even more impressive in person!  It's enough to make a guy think about CNC... OK, not for long, but I did think! :)

Thanks for taking the time to share!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on October 28, 2013, 09:11:46 AM
Looks good Dave  :ThumbsUp:

Forgive my natural tendency not to let the moths out of my purse  :paranoia: .... That looks like a very expensive  :o bit of stuff you made that out of.... I'd have gone for your alternative option make it out of an assembly silver soldered up  ;)

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on October 29, 2013, 09:59:10 PM
Dave, that was awesome!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on October 29, 2013, 10:06:17 PM
That's just freaking amazing. If asked about it in  conversation, I'd just babble.  :cheers: :DrinkPint: :cheers:

Whiskey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on October 29, 2013, 11:24:54 PM
Nice to see you making some progress Dave, that valve body turned out great.  :ThumbsUp:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on October 29, 2013, 11:58:01 PM
Thanks for the kind words everyone;

Jo when I started putting this post together you are the first one that came to mind; I was thinking to myself oh man Jo is possibly going to give me a hard time about turning most of that bronze block to shavings.

That's OK I understand and you can  :stickpoke: at me all you want  :naughty:. I really wanted to see this part carved from one piece; also this type of work is a big part of my day job and making parts like this allows me to improve my 3D surfacing skills.

Thanks again,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on October 30, 2013, 07:35:58 AM
Oh dear am I that easy to read  :embarassed:

You have to remember that I have a (damp) shed full of what was good bits of steel 20 years ago that I am determined to turn into bits of model engine. And I am still trying to learn how to spend money again.. it is very difficult.. I do anything to avoid it :shrug:

And by the looks of things Dave there are a few things you could teach me with your techniques :naughty: I still have not caught this CNC bug I am more of a traditional hands on type of girl...

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on October 30, 2013, 11:05:55 AM
I'm not a CNC type either, but I really enjoyed seeing that bit come out of the single block. Gotta disagree with Jo, turning all that metal into swarf isn't a waste, it's just making good use of your machine  :Lol:

Anyway, great work Dave!
Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on October 30, 2013, 04:40:50 PM
There's as much art in the set up of that part as there is in the part!

Nice Job Dave! :ThumbsUp:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 20, 2013, 01:13:27 AM
Hi Everyone

Here is the continuation of the intake valve construction.
The valve body was removed from the frame using the band saw; Iím sorry I got carried away and didnít take many machining pictures. It was all pretty straight forward; I decided instead of reaching down through the 1/16Ē pipe openings to cut the ports that I would make an insert that would have the ports, valve seat and threads for the cap. My buddy gave me a bad time about it but it all worked out well.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_0085_zpse41f2c99.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_0085_zpse41f2c99.jpg.html)
After some machine work and fettling here is the valve body ready to have the insert installed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_008_zpsf437771f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_008_zpsf437771f.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the insert; you can see the ports and the valve seat on the edge of the flat land.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_007_zpscbadaab1.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_007_zpscbadaab1.jpg.html)
And a different view.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_009_zps45a2552c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_009_zps45a2552c.jpg.html)
The insert was Loctited in place with high strength cylindrical bonder (609) also I always use the primer.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_010_zpsb30d5ee1.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_010_zpsb30d5ee1.jpg.html)
After the Loctite set the top of the insert was faced off flush with the bronze body.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_011_zpsd6ab762d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_011_zpsd6ab762d.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the valve; the original had the tapered top like this one does (at least the one I saw a photo of did).

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_012_zpsfeaf0535.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_012_zpsfeaf0535.jpg.html)
The two remaining parts were the cap and the bob weight. The cap was designed to look like the one on the exhaust chest only smaller.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_013_zps846e6590.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_013_zps846e6590.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the cap installed on the body.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_015_zps0a9549f7.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_015_zps0a9549f7.jpg.html)
And finally a couple shot of the completed valve assembly installed on the engine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_014_zpsb8c68995.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Intake_014_zpsb8c68995.jpg.html)

Iím very pleased with how it turned out; hopefully it will perform ok as well. I still need to make the copper sealing washers for both valve caps.

Now on to the gas and air hand cocks.


Thanks again for checking in and all the kind words.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on November 20, 2013, 02:24:06 AM
Wow that is Gorgeous Dave!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on November 20, 2013, 02:29:11 AM
That's really turned out beautifully Dave

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 20, 2013, 02:34:55 AM
That's really turned out beautifully Dave

Steve
What Steve said, I ilke.......... :ThumbsUp:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on November 20, 2013, 07:32:37 AM
 :naughty: It does look rather nice. There is nothing wrong with having an insert for your ports and seats  :ThumbsUp:.

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on November 20, 2013, 12:13:01 PM
What a beauty!!

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on November 20, 2013, 02:47:31 PM
Wow Dave!  That looks really nice!  :ThumbsUp:

Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on November 20, 2013, 05:08:59 PM
Very nice! That looks almost too good  ;D  The insert is a neat trick, too.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on November 20, 2013, 07:10:52 PM
Magazine and museum quality stuff. I just dream of being able to replicate this level of craftsmanship. :cheers:

Whiskey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 21, 2013, 02:11:00 AM
Wow thanks for all the kind words everyone; that means a lot to me.

Simon, the bronze oxidizes pretty fast so hopefully it wont look too nice for very long. No polish on this one; I want it to develop a nice patina; it will be painted though.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 26, 2013, 02:33:32 AM
Hi everyone,

The Pacific doesnít have any type of mixer or carburetor just 3 hand cocks; one for air one for gas and the third acts as a throttle. Primitive I know but after all it was 1890.

Morrison and Marvin supply these beautiful bronze investment cast hand cocks. These are scaled directly from originals of the same period.

To properly make these valves there really is no getting around having to make some fixtures. I thought about this a lot (procrastinated) about how I was going to do it. Having access to rapid prototyping equipment at work I decided that I would like to try making some machining fixtures on the 3D printers.
So maybe part of this segment should be titled adventures in 3d printing.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_001_zpsfa553588.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_001_zpsfa553588.jpg.html)
Here are the valve castings from Morrison and Marvin. I did just a little fettling to remove the mold lines and then a trip through the bead blaster which restored the original finish.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_003_zps3e1ef840.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_003_zps3e1ef840.jpg.html)
Starting with the body castings; they were held in a hex collet and indicated in. Carefully the end was faced and center drilled. The main diameter was turned and a notch cut as a reference to where they would be cut off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_004_zps1d5377c5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_004_zps1d5377c5.jpg.html)
Here are the bodies ready for the next operation.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_005_zps74b04786.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_005_zps74b04786.jpg.html)
Flipped around and held in a collet the bore for the ID thread is opened up with a boring bar to maintain concentricity with the opposite end.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_006_zpsd12df283.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_006_zpsd12df283.jpg.html)
The 1/16Ē NPT or 5/16ĒMTP is taped using a guide in the tailstock.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_007_zps260009db.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_007_zps260009db.jpg.html)
After the bodies have been cut and faced to length the taper for the pipe thread is machined using a boring bar. Also the hole through the center will be drilled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_008_zps20f46e8e.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_008_zps20f46e8e.jpg.html)
Here are the three bodies ready to have the threads milled. A couple of reasons for wanting to mill the threads; this something I have never done and will (hopefully) result in better threads than with using a die.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_010_zpsf5615b49.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_010_zpsf5615b49.jpg.html)
Here is my first printed fixture; this one done on a FDM machine (Fused Deposition Modeling) the most common 3d printer you see these days.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_011_zps2186969d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_011_zps2186969d.jpg.html)
The assembled fixture in the mill ready to mill the threads. This type of fixture could also easily be used in a 4 jaw chuck.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_012_zpsd1c0f524.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_012_zpsd1c0f524.jpg.html)
I indicated each one in but surprisingly they were all within a couple thou of each other.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_013_zps2b30be50.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_013_zps2b30be50.jpg.html)
Here is an action shot of the thread milling operation.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_014_zpse7382b09.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_014_zpse7382b09.jpg.html)
With just a little tweaking I was getting an acceptable thread; I did run a couple of aluminum dummy parts to get it dialed in.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_015_zps4172215c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_015_zps4172215c.jpg.html)
The three valve bodies ready for the next operation.

I kind of went overboard on the pictures so I will post more later.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 26, 2013, 02:48:14 AM
That's some awesome work Dave. I am getting more and more interested in those 3D printers.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: swilliams on November 26, 2013, 06:38:44 AM
Love it Dave. Great to see a bit about what some of this new technology can do

Steve
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on November 26, 2013, 07:41:27 AM
Those are rather nice lost wax castings  :naughty:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on November 26, 2013, 10:41:00 AM
I like that a lot Dave! :ThumbsUp:....you know, it's the first time I've seen NC thread milling in a home shop....plenty in industry mind you....and why not!....it does a great job!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 26, 2013, 01:41:14 PM
Thanks for the comments everyone,

Dave actually that is my machine at work; fortunately the boss lets us use our machines and the rest of the shop tools for personal projects on the off hours.

I have been working on an upgrade to my CNC at home and one of the items on the list is a Quill drive assembly for the Z; then I should be able to do this type of work at home.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on November 26, 2013, 07:05:13 PM
Beautiful work Dave. I can see why he let's y'all use the shop after hours. Anyone that keeps machinery and tools looking that nice deserves a little " incentive ". Believe me, cooks don't think that way :lolb:.

Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 27, 2013, 02:28:01 AM
Hi everyone

Before I continuing on with the body machining I wanted to get the handle plugs machined; this way I would have a gage to know when I had bored the bodies deep enough.

This operation required the next fixture; this one was done on our SLA (Stereo Lithography) machine. The SLA builds parts by rastering a laser across the top surface of a vat of UV sensitive resin. The part is built in .003Ē layers and drops deeper into the vat as the parts are built. The SLA is one of the most accurate of all the rapid prototyping machines.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_016_zps5ac7a831.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_016_zps5ac7a831.jpg.html)
Here is the fixture along with the handle plug casting.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_017_zpsfac46330.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_017_zpsfac46330.jpg.html)
Assembled and ready for the mill

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_018_zps910d6c04.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_018_zps910d6c04.jpg.html)
Like before each part was indicated in; but this proved unnecessary as they were all within a couple thousandths.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_019_zps7b348d2f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_019_zps7b348d2f.jpg.html)
A small program was created that faced to length, machined the two diameters, cut the flat, milled the threads, chamfered the end and centered drilled it. Here is the result; as before a couple of aluminum test parts were machined to check the program.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_020_zpsbe883001.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_020_zpsbe883001.jpg.html)
Here are the 3 handle plugs ready for the next operation.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_021_zps14f52ad9.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_021_zps14f52ad9.jpg.html)
Notice the rather large hole; Iím sure this was fine for a full sized engine but on a model it will make it a challenge to get the mixture set properly.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_022_zps58fff24d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_022_zps58fff24d.jpg.html)
My attempted solution lies in this little pile of brass parts.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_023_zpsf4516350.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_023_zpsf4516350.jpg.html)
After machining they were given several center punch marks to allow room for the solder to flow.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_024_zps51b985a5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_024_zps51b985a5.jpg.html)
Assembled in the handle plug; they were left long and will be machined along with the rest of the taper.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_026_zpsf514075f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_026_zpsf514075f.jpg.html)
Here are a couple of shots just after soldering the inserts in place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_025_zps8a927fe3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_025_zps8a927fe3.jpg.html)
The diamond orifice pattern is typical of the gas valves used on some of the early stationary engines

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_027_zps9701d0ee.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_027_zps9701d0ee.jpg.html)
After another trip through the blast cabinet the handle plugs were set up to machine the taper; instead of than turning them between centers a collet was used on the #10 threaded end to hold the handle. Everything on this end was machined in the same setup so this worked out just fine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_028_zps503f7eb0.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_028_zps503f7eb0.jpg.html)
Rather than grind a special tool I though what the heck the parting tool looks like it just may work; wrong application I know but using light cuts the insert parting blade did a beautiful job turning he taper on the handles.

Now we can move on to boring the bodies.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on November 27, 2013, 07:35:33 AM
Dave did you reduce all the cocks, I would have thought the small hole a bit restrictive on the one that controls the air?

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on November 27, 2013, 04:18:35 PM
Never seen a thread milled at all, looks great is that just the x and y axis doing it, no rotary axis? Castings are great too.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 27, 2013, 04:22:19 PM
Hi Nick

It is a helical ramp so as the cutter is moving in a circle (actually the part) the cutter is moving in z at the proper thread pitch.

Thanks,

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on November 28, 2013, 10:36:15 AM
Impressive!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on December 14, 2013, 01:03:04 PM
Great photography, makes it all look like a model! Just joking, the work is so good! Sets the bar very high for all of us!
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 15, 2013, 05:46:36 PM
Hi everyone,

Mosey; thanks for the kind words.

Here is the last set of photos dealing with the construction of the hand cocks.

The bodies needed to be bored and faced on each end; the top gets a tapered surface that the indicating lines will be engraved on. Another printed fixture was designed and made; I was hoping to run these on the SLA machine (Stereo Lithography) but it was booked up so I built them on one of our FDM 3d printers. This process in not as accurate and some hand work was required to get the fixture to completely close up on the body casting. Also the OD of the fixture was machined to help in the setup of each valve body.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_029_zpsc820ddd7.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_029_zpsc820ddd7.jpg.html)
Here is the split round fixture with the body casting in place.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_030_zpsc65ed95f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_030_zpsc65ed95f.jpg.html)
Here it is closed up; each end of the body can be machined as well as the bore. Each time the fixture is put in the lathe the part is indicated in both axially and radially.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_031_zps7a2d9f71.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_031_zps7a2d9f71.jpg.html)
The bore is machined using a small solid carbide boring bar. The same compound setting was used that was used to turn the taper on the handle plug. The finished handle plugs were used as a gage the get the proper size of the bore


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_032_zps38c44283.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_032_zps38c44283.jpg.html)
The top surface is cleaned up at the prober angle to give a nice surface for engraving the indicating lines.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_033_zpsf2eb7f87.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_033_zpsf2eb7f87.jpg.html)
A tapered plug fixture was turned to allow the body casting to be held in a 5C indexer for engraving the lines. The lines were patterned so the valve may flipped 180 and still have the handle pointing down when the valve is fully open.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_034_zps464bbe99.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_034_zps464bbe99.jpg.html)
Next up was the thrust washer with a D shaped hole; there was some discussion about this a while back on the forum. I decided to go for the fabricated version as opposed to making a punch.

A couple bits of 660 bearing bronze were silver soldered together after drilling the proper sized hole and milling it down to where the flat is located.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_035_zps559a4116.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_035_zps559a4116.jpg.html)
Indicated in the Sherline 4 jaw chuck the first side of the washer was machined and then parted off.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_036_zpsaabfbea2.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_036_zpsaabfbea2.jpg.html)
Flipped around and held in a collet the bottom sided was profiled and polished.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_037_zps95eb7b63.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_037_zps95eb7b63.jpg.html)
The SLA handle fixture was modified to expose the area of the handle where the pointer goes. Set up in the mill, the pointer hole was drilled. The pointer is a piece of .032Ē music wire cut sharpened and Loctited in place. The washers and nut help align the handle in the fixture because the fixture was designed the hold the raw casting and not the machined one.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_038_zpsfedf3ce0.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_038_zpsfedf3ce0.jpg.html)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_039_zpsfba88a17.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/GasandAirCocks_039_zpsfba88a17.jpg.html)
The last two shots are of the completed valves ready to be installed on the engine; it sure was nice have that little project behind me. Had I been thinking I may have bought a few more castings and made some spares for possible future project.

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on December 15, 2013, 06:02:54 PM
Works of art, those handles are, Dave!

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on December 15, 2013, 07:03:57 PM
That is some impressive work Dave.  :ThumbsUp:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 16, 2013, 12:25:49 AM
Thanks Don and Simon,


Here are a couple shots of the engine with the valves fitted and the intake plumbing pretty much complete.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Plumbing_001_zps3692b4b5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Plumbing_001_zps3692b4b5.jpg.html)

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Plumbing_002_zps4db60351.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Plumbing_002_zps4db60351.jpg.html)

Thanks for checking in,

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on December 16, 2013, 12:33:25 AM
Wow Dave, that's some very impressive work there! You've done a bang up job on those valves!  :ThumbsUp:

Thanks for sharing,
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on December 16, 2013, 12:34:41 AM
Is that an air hose I see sneaking into those pictures?? That means that this thing runs, amirite? We demand video!  :Director:

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 16, 2013, 12:42:26 AM
Thanks guys,

Not quite Simon, that will be the fuel feed line; propane or gas from a vapor carburetor, it was just stuck on there for show.
It is getting close though; just a few loose ends to finish up and just maybe it will run.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on December 16, 2013, 01:58:18 AM
Wow! I haven't seen it all together before, man that looks a treat Dave. That is one engine to be proud of and some great work.  :praise2:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: NickG on December 17, 2013, 07:50:25 PM
Wowser, looks spectacular!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on December 17, 2013, 08:40:43 PM
Magnificent  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :cheers:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on December 17, 2013, 10:45:24 PM
My glass is empty and I'm just drooling on my coaster :cheers:. Just awe inspiring and bar raising work. If y'all need some part time help, tell the boss I'm a helluva cook :lolb: and if I get to work with you some, I'll buy the beer :cheers:

Whiskey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on December 18, 2013, 12:50:19 AM
Dave, what a wonderful build log...a study in museum quality craftsmanship....truly inspiring!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: metalmad on December 18, 2013, 05:00:42 AM
Its gorgeous Dave  :praise2:
Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on December 18, 2013, 10:27:29 AM
You know it's good when you have to go back a page of praise to see the photo's!  :lolb:

Dave that is Awesome!.....

Can't wait for the first puff! :ThumbsUp:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 20, 2013, 12:50:44 AM
Thanks for the kind words guys I really appreciate it.

Also sorry about the fuzzy pictures; I will see if I can get some better ones and switch them out.

Tomorrow is the last day of work then off for two whole weeks :whoohoo: for Christmas and New Years. I have been working on my CNC upgrade project and plan to split time off between that and  the Pacific.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on April 26, 2014, 10:55:44 PM
Hey Dave,
How's the Pacific coming along?  Its been a few months since we've had an update. I remember you had surgery on your hand back in Feburary. Hope that's healing well and you can continue on with your build soon.
Inquiring minds want to know... :)
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on April 26, 2014, 11:47:00 PM
  :popcornsmall:


Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 28, 2014, 01:55:22 AM

Hi Guys

Yes the Pacific is feeling neglected sitting under a cover on my work bench.

The finger is coming along pretty well; it has been a long haul. I got the pins taken out on April 4th and then the stitches 10 days later, so at this point Iím just trying to get the range of motion back to somewhat normal. Itís not keeping me from working in the shop though.

Things have gotten very busy for me in my  home shop and I just havenít had any time to work on my own things. Iím not goofing off I work in the shop most days after work and usually Saturday and Sunday. I have been helping a friend with some machine work on his full sized engine restoration projects.

The CNC upgrade project which I started on again in December has stalled although I did get the sheet metal punched out for the keyboard and mouse tray at work last week; now I just need to find time to get it folded up with the press brake. This is the missing piece that I need to be able to get the new control panel installed on the mill. If anyone in interested in what Iím doing with the CNC I could post some pictures in the Machines Tools and Fixtures section.

All along I have wanted to model the pump pictured in an original advertisement from 1892. Interesting I purchased the add on eBay many years ago just because I liked it. Not knowing that someday I would be building a model of the engine. Iím about 100% sure the pump was made by the Goulds Manufacturing Co.  in Seneca Falls NY.

Here is a scan of the original add
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific_Small_zpsda0f615f.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific_Small_zpsda0f615f.jpg.html)

The missing link was provided in a picture loaned to me by Lester Bowman that showed what the casting looked like that mounted the bull gear on the engine; this was obscured by the gear in the picture and would have only been a guess as to what was back there.

My brother who is an Auto CAD master has been helping me take a scanned image from the original add scaled to match my engine (as well as we can) and then creating top, front and side views  of the pump. Iím using these 2d drawings as a base to create a 3d model in Solid Works. Without his help Iím not sure I could have done it.
Here is a screen shot of what I have so far; there still a quite a bit of tweaking left to do on these parts, but it is a start. I have really been struggling with the base trying to get it to look right.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/001_zpscb2eef6a.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/001_zpscb2eef6a.jpg.html)

Itís not small, it will be over 8Ē tall and the base has roughly a 4ĒX 6Ē footprint. The tie studs are ľĒ in diameter.  Iím calling my Pacific a 1/3 scale model of a 3/4hp engine. That makes the pump about Ĺ the size of the engine. I think it will make a nice display.

May is going to be a very busy month for me, 30 year wedding anniversary, daughterís high school graduation birthdays etc.  But I do plan to make some more progress in the near future.
Thanks for checking on me.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on April 28, 2014, 02:21:41 AM
Great Dave, Happy anniversary and congrats on the daughter graduating. No worries buddy we will still be here, after all this is a hobby. By the way the pump is looking great.   :popcornsmall:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on April 28, 2014, 05:15:39 AM
Hey Dave!
Nice to hear things are progressing well with your finger!
Of course, take your time. Just wanted to see how things were going  :stickpoke:
Congrats on the Anniversary and the graduation!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on April 28, 2014, 07:11:07 AM
Hi Dave, good to hear that things are getting normal again. Having both hands corrected by surgeries during the  last 10 years, I can imagine what are your feelings. I like the way how you are doing the pump story. Congrats on the Anniversary and the graduation. Yes, I am very much interested in your CNC upgrade project.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on April 28, 2014, 10:50:28 AM
Glad you're getting back to the models. The base of the pump engine reminds me somewhat of the engine that Jason B is building.

I would also like to see your CNC rebuild/upgrade work  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 28, 2014, 12:46:25 PM
Glad to hear things are progressing well Dave.
Congratulations on the anniversary.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 29, 2014, 01:09:03 AM
Thanks for the comments and well wishes guys.

I will see if I can get something posted on my CNC in the next few days; Just had more work show up at my door step this afternoon. I have to modify the valve pockets in a set of high performance big block Chevy pistons; one of the many odd jobs I do in the home shop.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 06, 2014, 07:21:58 PM
Hi everyone,

Work has started to progress on the pump and related drive components and I finally have some progress pictures to share. Maury from Lone Star Engine Works has graciously offered to help me create castings for the Goulds pump and drive assembly; we have both been busy working on this part of the project most of the summer as time allows. Maury is very skilled at machining, pattern work and metal casting and this has been a wonderful opportunity for me to learn more about this part of our hobby.

I have the 3d models mostly complete and Maury has been taking my models and doing the necessary operations to turn them into patterns, adding machining allowance, draft, core prints, and scaling for shrinkage. We both have been making patterns and core boxes and I will have an update showing some of this work moving forward.

If you look back at post #280 you can see a drawing of the pumping outfit. I purchased this original 1892 advertisement off eBay many years ago; having no idea that someday I would be building the engine, I just liked it. After starting on the engine it was always my desire to make the pump too. The missing part of the equation was, how is the large bull gear mounted to the engine. A photo loaned to me by Lester Bowman (the original creator of the Pacific Model) answered this question.

Now, knowing how the gear is mounted and that it was a bolt on attachment to the engine I thought I just might be able to pull this off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001_zps75086b8d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001_zps75086b8d.jpg.html)
This is a photo of an original bull gear bracket mounted on the engine base and crankcase. There is a real good chance that this is the only one of these in existence. Photo complements of Lester Bowman.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001b_zps83877381.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001b_zps83877381.jpg.html)
I started out modeling the bracket and working out gear sizes that would best match the original and still fit the model. Once the design seemed like it was going to work, the parts were printed to check the fit on the engine.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001a_zps26e4199c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_001a_zps26e4199c.jpg.html)
Here is the SLA gear set being checked to see how the gears are going to look mounted on the engine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_001_zps5f9bae39.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_001_zps5f9bae39.jpg.html)
I was going to make the gears but this is a another area where Maury offered his assistance. Maury made the pinion gear and I finished it by adding the collar. If you look back at the original you can see the gear has this collar where the set screws are to mount the gear to the crank shaft.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_002_zps9cfc3599.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_002_zps9cfc3599.jpg.html)
After the collar was turned and pressed onto the gear it was set up in the mill using a collet block to add the setscrew holes.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_003_zps15fb7acf.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pinion_003_zps15fb7acf.jpg.html)
A pair of period correct square head setscrews were made and case hardened.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_001_zps7c779e1c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_001_zps7c779e1c.jpg.html)
I machined my bull gear blank from a 6Ē slice of gray cast iron, and then sent it down to Maury where he used his gear hobber to cut the teeth. The gear came out beautiful, Maury does nice work!
Here the blank is faced, turned, and bored.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_002_zpsb49fe010.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_002_zpsb49fe010.jpg.html)
This picture is for Jo, I know how much she hates to waste material. So instead of just flipping the blank around and turning off the excess material, the band saw was used to slab off the extra for some future project.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_003_zpsc63acaaf.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_003_zpsc63acaaf.jpg.html)
Back in the lathe the other side of the gear blank is faced to proper thickness.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_004_zpsf366426b.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/BullGear_004_zpsf366426b.jpg.html)
Here is finished gear with the related hardware. The shaft was case hardened and polished and the iron gear will run directly on the shaft. If it gives me any trouble down the road I will install a bronze bushing. An oil hole was drilled through the bolt and the shaft also drilled to allow for oiling of the gear. Check out those nice teeth!

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_002_zps50afa188.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_002_zps50afa188.jpg.html)
This is the first casting produced, Maury machined the pattern for the bracket and poured the casting. If you looked closely at Mauryís F&G thread you can see this casting was included along with the pump parts that he had cast for the F&G engine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_003_zpsefa11388.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_003_zpsefa11388.jpg.html)
Back view of the same bracket.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_004_zps67a10c26.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_004_zps67a10c26.jpg.html)
After a little fettling the casting is set up in the vise; a light skim is taken across the pads and the mounting holes drilled. A light cleanup cut was also taken across the gear surface, it will be further machined later on.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_005_zps368818e5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_005_zps368818e5.jpg.html)
The upper mounting lug is machined to proper thickness.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_006_zps3bae21f8.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_006_zps3bae21f8.jpg.html)
The upper mounting lug is drilled and counter sunk using the same datum surface as the first operation.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_007_zpsd8b8c9cc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_007_zpsd8b8c9cc.jpg.html)
A light skim is taken to true up the 5deg. of the mounting surface.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_008_zps438b40a2.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_008_zps438b40a2.jpg.html)
The engine was disassembled and mounted on an angle plate then dialed in. The crank shaft center line was also established at this time.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_009_zps7341b44c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_009_zps7341b44c.jpg.html)
Working from the crank center line the mounting holes were drilled and taped in the engine castings. A pair of high crown dome head bolts were also machined to mount the bracket to the engine. The modern flat head screw will be replaced with a proper slotted head screw later on.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_010_zps83a6452d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_010_zps83a6452d.jpg.html)
Using the Blake Coax indicator to pick up the center of the crank axis.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_011_zps5210f0da.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_011_zps5210f0da.jpg.html)
Checking the gear mesh before boring the shaft hole.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_012_zps979a4e80.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_012_zps979a4e80.jpg.html)
The shaft hole was drilled and bored; also at this time the bracket was faced using the facing head to insure the face was perpendicular to the shaft axis.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_013_zps16bf15fc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_013_zps16bf15fc.jpg.html)
I took the opportunity at this time to drill, tap, and spot face for the spark saver still needing to be made.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_014_zps65ce7fa2.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_014_zps65ce7fa2.jpg.html)
Here the gears are mounted on the engine (they run real nice!).

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_015_zps3b664571.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_015_zps3b664571.jpg.html)

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_016_zps103b0fc7.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Bracket_016_zps103b0fc7.jpg.html)

I canít express how happy I am to see the gears mounted on the engine. This has been a dream of mine since I started the construction of the engine; this is a milestone for me and now I can see that it is going be a reality. The rest of the pump is coming along nicely and there will be updates coming showing the construction of the pump. Hopefully Maury will also be able to share some of his work along with mine.
I would like to thank Maury for offering to dive into this project with me and share his expertise; we both have been having a great time collaborating and sharing ideas; and Iím getting an education on the casting process. If not for him I wouldnít be nearly this far along.

Question; should the pump construction be in a different section or mixed in with the engine build?

Thanks for checking in,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on September 06, 2014, 07:51:40 PM
Hi Dave, that is an excellent job you did there. That was not a simple  challenge. Thanks for taking the time to show us the pictures and the build log.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on September 06, 2014, 08:36:32 PM
 :whoohoo: nice to see an update here Dave, and what a fine one it is! I'm always impressed with the quality of your work  :ThumbsUp:

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 06, 2014, 08:38:57 PM
A great addition to an already lovely engine Dave. So nice to see you working on it again!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 06, 2014, 08:39:49 PM
Dave I am glad to see you back on this project. Your work has always been top notch. I am still eager to see the Pacfic completed. Awesome bud just awesome. I like................ :praise2:

 :popcornsmall:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on September 06, 2014, 09:14:45 PM
Thanks for the update Dave.  Beautiful work as usual.  Pity that it will cover the embossed name of the engine but I guess it cannot be helped.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on September 07, 2014, 06:11:23 AM
That's gorgeous Dave!  You've done a beautiful job on this engine, that's for sure.

Unfortunately, I probably won't see it at GEARS this year. I'd planned on being there, but now it looks like I'll be taking my son to School out of state that weekend.  What a bummer. :(  (Not school, of course, I'm happy he's going.  Just sad to miss the show...)

Thanks for sharing your build with us Dave,
Kim

PS I'd just put the pump on this thread, since its going with this engine.  But I'll change my mind agree with the mods & more experienced folks they say otherwise :)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on September 07, 2014, 09:07:53 AM
Beautiful, just beautiful. Great to see you back on this one, Dave!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 07, 2014, 02:00:59 PM
Dave, thanks for the compliments. As always, your work on the Pacific is AWESOME! You will have a real gem to show at GEARS. Wish I was able to come up there to see it.

Do you have any idea why the pinon has that rim on the hub? Is it just to provide more threads for the set screw perhaps, or did it actually provide alignment for the bull gear?

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 07, 2014, 05:05:38 PM
Achim, Simon, Bill, Don, Vince, Kim, Dave & Maury;
Thanks guys for all the nice comments and your support.

Vince covering up the letters is probably the one and only negative thing about adding the pump to the engine. Hopefully the visual interest of the pump and drive assembly will overshadow the covered letters.

Kim; bummer that you wonít be able to make the show, I was looking forward to being able to visit with you this year.

Maury; I donít have a real good answer other than what you indicated about the set screws. The gear may have been cast with the teeth already in place. Otherwise there would be a big radius from the cutter at the root of the teeth. It would be fun to see an original one.

The original engine in the picture is in a museum and mostly taken apart and stored away. It is hard to say how much of it they have.

Thanks again guys,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on September 07, 2014, 06:32:02 PM
That's looking really good, congratulations  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 08, 2014, 02:18:26 PM
Thanks Roger,


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Admiral_dk on September 09, 2014, 09:54:36 AM
Very nice addition and very nice work, but I can't help have a nagging question in my mind :

The big gear - would that really have been "solid" on the "original" (sorry never seen it) ?

To me, it would have been made with spokes - like a lot of flywheels.

This isn't meant as critic, but if it has spokes you might be able to see the nice lettering behind the gear.

Best wishes

Per
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on September 09, 2014, 11:02:26 AM
Thats comming along well Dave. Shame that the gear does cover the writing. Do you know if the etching is correct as they sometimes used a bit of artistic licence, but if its all you have to go on then the solid gear would have to be assumed correct.

Have you seen the video of Lester's one on Smokstak? looks and sounds the part.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on September 09, 2014, 03:08:29 PM
Dave,
This is a superior piece of work, as usual for you.
When I see your work, I want to run down to my shop, tidy up for a couple of days, send the machines out for repainting, and buy a ton of accessories.
The  setup of the work is outstanding and very instructive, and now I'll stop complaining when it is difficult to hold the work or indicate on the machine.
Please include us in your progress.
Thanks for showing us how it should be done.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 10, 2014, 01:13:04 AM
Per, Jason, and Mosey; thanks guys for the great comments and support, I appreciate it.

My original intention was to reproduce the pumping outfit in the advertisement as close as I could; I guess at the expense of covering up Lesterís nice lettering on the base.
Maury and I also had this conversation and I kind of dug my heals in and said this is how I want mine to look. Maury thinking more like you guys didnít want to cover up the lettering on his engine. So he designed and cast a spoked bull gear.

I think I will go ahead with the solid gear at this time knowing that I can always add the spokes later if I choose. But Iím kind of having second thoughts now, thinking a nice set of tapered spokes wouldnít look too bad.
I only have the add to go by and the closest thing I have seen to an original is the picture of the bracket that I posted earlier.

Mosey, you are too kind,

Thanks again guys,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on September 10, 2014, 01:22:01 AM
Sorry, Dave,
I vote for the spokes, also.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 10, 2014, 03:58:27 AM
OK, I've been holding off on chiming in on this subject because part of me agrees with Dave on making the pump as close as possible to the original. After all, that is what a scale model is. Here is a pic of my artistic license on the bull gear.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 10, 2014, 04:22:19 AM
Dam beautiful work Maury and that would differently make it look awesome. I like................... :praise2:


Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on September 10, 2014, 08:04:07 AM
I suppose one advantage of the solid gear is it would give the option to run different stroke pumps, etc as a new hole could be added to give the correct throw rather than have one casting for each size pump. As its also likely the pumps would get changed after the initial sale it allows for a bit of "Farm Engineering" by the owner to get it to run whatever he wants. Maybe a compromise would be say 4 holes to reduce the material used but still keep it looking like a disc as you see on some of the timing gears such a sthe Monitor.

Nice gear Maury though I suppose it would really have been in iron but that means outsourcing the casting.

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on September 10, 2014, 01:26:07 PM
Personally I'd vote for the gear too. The only downside if you 3D mill the spokes into it is all the hand finishing afterwards (having just spent too many hours fettling a steel pulley for my entablature engine...  :wallbang: )
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: GWRdriver on September 23, 2014, 02:56:44 PM
Much more fitting IMHO . . .
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on November 10, 2014, 12:41:39 PM
Hi Dave,

How's it going on this one, any more progress on this one yet?  :stickpoke:  :Lol:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 11, 2014, 12:53:43 AM
Hi Dave

Thanks for checking on me; sadly I haven't had time to work on my engine since before the GEARS show in late September (wow has it been that long!). Don't give up on me, it is getting to be the time of year where one has more shop time. Hopefully some of that shop time will be spent on my projects. I do work for other folks in my home shop as well; pays for the toys.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on November 11, 2014, 01:27:10 PM
Ah that's a shame, Dave, but fingers crossed for some time soon. I know what you mean about the paying work at home, but I decided to give it up some time ago for the same reason - everyone else's projects came on in leaps and bounds whilst mine languished in the corner. It's more expensive, but more fun to play with my own toys.

Keep up the good work though,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 05, 2015, 12:09:56 AM
Hi everyone

I managed to carve out a little bit of time over the holidays to work on the Pacific. I didnít get very much done but every little bit get me closer to the end.

There are a couple parts (safety devices) that go in the fuel inlet piping between the vapor carburetor and the engine. The first one is the flame arrester; this device has a stack of metal screens inside a housing that in the event of a backfire will quench and extinguish a flame that is moving back up the pipe.

The next piece is a check valve/ relief valve assembly that mounts directly on the vapor carburetor. In the event of a backfire the relief valve opens and vents the excess pressure which keeps it from trying to push back into the carburetor. Also contained in this assembly is a swing check valve that opens when the engine pulls vacuum to let fuel through and then seals when the vacuum is removed.

I started with the flame arrester and then will move onto the check valve assembly.
Below is the patent that I have been working from; you can see both of these parts in the drawing and how they are used.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/US434695-0_zps9e035d1d.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/US434695-0_zps9e035d1d.jpg.html)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrestorAssembly_zps747e1ab5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrestorAssembly_zps747e1ab5.jpg.html)
The flame arrester was modeled in Geomagic; Using the existing piping and hand cocks as a guide I played with the size and shape until I came up with something I was pleased with.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_001_zpse05bd148.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_001_zpse05bd148.jpg.html)
Starting out the insides of both the top and bottom were machined; leaving the bottom half long for something to chuck on to.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_002_zps69a05702.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_002_zps69a05702.jpg.html)
The top was screwed onto the bottom and then faced to length.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_003_zps0fab2e37.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_003_zps0fab2e37.jpg.html)
Here the top section has been machined to length.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_004_zpscd8cd540.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_004_zpscd8cd540.jpg.html)
The stock wonít fit in a collet so the bottom was held in a 3 jaw chuck and also faced to length.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_005_zps98bc3796.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_005_zps98bc3796.jpg.html)
Both the top and bottom had the hex cut and the 1/16Ē NPT threads put in.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_006_zpsdcc5a725.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_006_zpsdcc5a725.jpg.html)
I used the step and cut method to generate the profile of the oval shape. One end was held using a ĹĒ hex collet then when flipped around to profile the other end a round collet was used on one of the steps. This worked out better to maintain concentricity end to end.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_007_zpse09ea1ec.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_007_zpse09ea1ec.jpg.html)
After some hand work with files and sand paper here is the final shape.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_008_zpsfb38d014.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_008_zpsfb38d014.jpg.html)
I still need to punch out the stack of screens to fit inside but that will be done later.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_010_zpsa7ecad38.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/FlameArrester_010_zpsa7ecad38.jpg.html)
Here it is installed on the engine; Iím pleased with how it looks and complements the other parts on the engine.

Remember a while back I posted some pictures in the Chatterbox section of a couple large Fairbanks Morse carburetors that I had machined from castings? Well these parts were machined from the chucking lugs that were removed from those two carburetor castings.


I have also made a good start on the check valve assembly and will hopefully have an update on it in the near future.
Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: ths on January 05, 2015, 03:33:03 AM
A stunning result with the flame arrestor. How did you calculate the step cutting movements? Hugh.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 05, 2015, 04:00:18 AM
A stunning result with the flame arrestor. How did you calculate the step cutting movements? Hugh.
I second that Dave and it's nice to see some more progress on this awesome engine.

Do
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on January 05, 2015, 04:56:10 AM
Hi Dave, the next beautiful details for your engine. Perfectly done.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on January 05, 2015, 05:23:51 AM
Good to see you back at it Dave.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on January 05, 2015, 07:46:57 AM
Glad you were able to get some shop time.  That looks great Dave - The flame arrestor really adds to the whole.  Very nicely done!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 05, 2015, 08:30:19 PM
Dave,
I have been following this build from the beginning and to me it is one of the nicest engines I have seen from the quality of the castings to your impeccable work on every detail.  I look forward to each new update!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 05, 2015, 10:49:08 PM
Guys, Thanks for all the kind words; just wish I had more time to spend on it.

Hugh, I have a little book that I purchased years ago from Guy Lautard (The Machinist Bedside Reader guy) called "Tables and Instructions for Ball and Radius Generation". Its a handy little book that has everything figured out for all the common fractional sizes from 1/64" to 1" by 64ths. sadly it is out of print.

I have also done this sort of thing using a 2d cad program by drawing out the arc intersected by lines spaced how much you want to step over. then each point where the line intersects the arc is measured and used to drive the lathe tool. Very tedious but works good for very large radii.

Marv Klotz also has a utility that will calculate this as well; below is a description from the web site.

"You don't need to buy/build a ball cutting attachment for your lathe if you only need to cut occasional, non-critical spherical shapes. This little program will give you a printable incremental cutting schedule that gets the job done fast. Guy Lautard documents this technique but I was using it long before he documented it. The tables in his publications limit one to certain pre-determined ball diameters. This program will produce a tailored cutting schedule for any diameter. BTW, this type of machining is referred to as HAM (Human Assisted Machining)! See also PROFILE. "

I'm going to give his a try; sounds like it works just the same only more versatile.

Thanks again guys.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 06, 2015, 12:53:40 AM
Dave that's what I like about graving, just place a rest for the tool and the rest comes easy. Since you were doing brass it's way easier to use a graver. Your results were outstanding bud.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 06, 2015, 01:08:41 AM
Thanks Don

You want a chuckle? after I had roughed out the profile I thought to myself, that is a lot of material to file off. So I got out a brazed carbide lathe tool with a flat face and went to town. Even just holding it freehand I was surprised how well it worked. Well when my hand got tired I flipped one of my boring bars around in the holder and used the but end of it as a tool rest then grabbed the lathe tool with a small pair of vice grips and continued cutting. It is amazing how well you can peal metal away just by hand.

Maybe some proper tooling is in order :lolb:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on February 23, 2015, 01:23:32 PM
Nothing wrong with a little hand scraping; I was taught it many years ago when I made an aluminium steering wheel during my apprenticeship, and it's been a lifesaver ever since.

As usual, beautiful craftsmanship, Dave.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 23, 2015, 01:56:32 PM
Thanks Dave,

Where have you been hiding?

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on February 23, 2015, 02:02:04 PM
Not so much hiding, Dave, run ragged is closer to the mark!!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on April 01, 2015, 04:16:27 AM
Dave,  as I have mentioned in my Union Chronicles, the Pacific Gas or Gasoline Engine was one of the first engines to be built in San Francisco.  The engines started with The Regan Vapor Engine in 1884 and soon was followed by the Pacific which used some of Regan's patents.

Court battles lasted several years and left both companies unable to continue so they joined and formed the Union Engine Company.  This dates the Pacific between June 8, 1889 and January 30, 1892 during which Pacific claimed "over 350 engines in successful operation".

I have a draft copy of a terrific book by my friend Jack Alexander.  He has just released the final version of "The Regan Vapor Engine" and it is available at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/jack-alexander/the-regan-vapor-engine/paperback/product-22100663.html

It is a wealth of information for those wanting history of early engines.  Even if you don't like engines it is interesting how all the companies were in a 4 by 6 block area near the waterfront and all intermixed ideas and people.

Also it irritates me that your Pacific is older and prettier than my Union!

Roland

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 02, 2015, 12:52:44 AM
Hi Roland

Thanks for the information and the complement on my engine.

Almost 500 pages of early California engine history and information, for the very reasonable sum of $19.00; what's not to like about that! My copy is in the mail, it shipped the day after I ordered it. They must have printed some stock anticipating orders.

Now I just need to carve out some time to work on the much neglected engine and pump.

Nice avatar by the way!

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on August 01, 2015, 07:58:15 PM
Dave, I peregrinated through Montana last month and checked on some Pacific Engine construction. I discovered a couple almost finished, one running and the other almost ready to run.  The workmanship is great and when I saw the oiler I questioned if you had been involved.

This scale oiler is an exact copy of the Lunkenheimer "ALPHA" Glass Body Oil Pump.  A pump is unusual on a small engine and perhaps newer than the Pacific Engine but sure looks nice.  Probably the Pacific Engines used a four (4) post drip oiler with wood knobs.  Now that would be a good project for you...

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 02, 2015, 01:42:47 AM
Hi Roland

That is indeed a beautiful oiler, thanks for the pictures; an engine as special as the Pacific really does deserve a proper oiler. Yes oilers can be purchased but they just aren't as nice. After all; the details really do make the model.  It is always fun to see what the other guys are up to.

The early 4 post oilers; Standard, Essex, etc. now their special; and proper equipment on some of the very early engines that we love.

Maybe some day when you have a little extra time ( :lolb:) we would like to see where you and the MM team are on that interesting Union engine.

Thanks again for the pictures,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on August 08, 2015, 05:11:11 PM
Dave,

I found my pictures of a typical Pacific Engine Oiler.  I have a San Francisco Standard Marine engine just a little later vintage than the Pacific (which also was available as a marine engine).

The Frisco Standard has original oilers.  They are four (4) post with wooden knobs, probably copied from steam era oilers where the knobs needed to stay cool.

I know these are original to the engine because the top is scalloped, as original pictures show, and is stamped "Standard Gas Engine Co.   San Francisco".

I believe the "Standard" oiler was similar but with a round top. Any four post oiler would be proper on an early engine.

Several years ago my late friend IJnze, visited from The Netherlands and drew up my oiler for his Pacific Engine. He then made a couple scale oilers.  When I was over in his workshop I took pictures of his Pacific Engine with these oilers.

These are the pictures I found and will attach.

OK  Dave, I'll tell about the progress on the Union Engine in a couple days (It also needs the same early oilers.....)

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 09, 2015, 04:57:38 PM
Roland, thanks for posting the pictures of the 4 post oilers. IJnze was an amazing model engineer and craftsman; I'm glad that I had the chance to meet him during one of his visits to the states.
At this point I don't see any way around it, my Pacific is going to need a pair of 4 post oilers to be properly complete.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on October 25, 2015, 03:50:54 PM
Dave,

Marvin must be having cold weather because he has more shop time.  He has taken your four post oiler drawing and cut a mold.  The first picture is a graphite electrode used to make the cavity. Graphite is very abrasive and he uses a diamond coated endmill to cut it.

Most of the cavity can be machined with a small ball endmill but the corners of the hex would not be sharp.

Marvin, being a perfectionist, then machines a graphite electrode and using an EDM finishes the cavity.

The second picture shows the mold before the gates are cut in.

I will get the wax pot hot....

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on October 25, 2015, 06:11:59 PM
Roland, thanks for sharing the pictures; looks like Marvin is making great progress!

A little history; a while back a couple 4 post oilers made their way from Benton City, WA to my shop. One is an Essex and the other an American Lubricator Co. The Essex would have been original equipment on the Kansas City Lightning engine among others. The American built oilers were used on the Union engines and proper equipment on a number of very early engines including the Pacific Vapor Engine.

The two oilers are very similar in construction; the Essex has round upper and lower plates. While the American Lubricator Co. plates have a more contoured shape; also the sight glass retainers are somewhat different between the two.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_001_zpshic6runq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_001_zpshic6runq.jpg.html)
Here is the original American Lubricator Co. oiler.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_002_zpsiqtswo0v.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_002_zpsiqtswo0v.jpg.html)
The American Lubricator Co. oiler was carefully dissembled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_003_zpswph3yr2q.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_003_zpswph3yr2q.jpg.html)
All the parts were cleaned; note the differences in the plates and sight glass retainers between the two oilers.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_004_zpsd7eh2cyt.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_004_zpsd7eh2cyt.jpg.html)
Each piece was measured and scaled to approximately ľ then modeled in Geomagic Design.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_005_zpsxxc1lbni.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_005_zpsxxc1lbni.jpg.html)
Here are a couple shots of the completed assembly; the size will be very close to the ones in the pictures Roland posted a while back that IJnze had made.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_006_zps5fp7topq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_006_zps5fp7topq.jpg.html)
Here is a start on the valve spindles; the large one which is the shutoff valve has a 3-48 thread. Then smaller metering valve has a 2-56 thread.

Iím looking forward to getting some more work on completed on these little guys and think that they are going to look real nice on the engine.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave




Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on October 26, 2015, 02:57:20 AM
Wow Dave, that's pretty cool, and amazingly authentic :)
You're going to have top-notch oilers for this engine, that's for sure!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 15, 2015, 11:45:58 PM
Hi Everyone

Kim thanks for the nice comments!
Marvin finished the mold for the oiler bodies and sent it to Rolandís Place in WA. I think, without spraying any melted wax on the ceiling; Roland was able to create the beautiful little wax oiler bodies pictured here.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_007_zpsdzmcltdu.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_007_zpsdzmcltdu.jpg.html)
Beautiful detail in these little guys.

The next step will be to send the waxes to the foundry and have them cast in brass or bronze; not exactly sure which alloy at this time.
Hopefully in the near future I will be able to share some pictures of the castings.
Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 16, 2015, 01:20:03 AM
Cool Dave, those look very promising and love the rendering of the oiler........... :ThumbsUp:


 :popcorn:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on November 16, 2015, 01:24:53 AM
Those are sweet Dave. Can't wait to see how the castings turn out.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on November 16, 2015, 05:51:09 AM
Hi Dave, looking great. Waiting for the castings. I like the lost form casting with wax, it gives always a smooth surface.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on November 17, 2015, 04:00:19 PM
Dave,  Good pictures.  How do you keep your hands so clean?

Notice this wax is brown because the only green wax I have left is on the ceiling where Marvin sprayed it.  The splendid green wax is not made anymore but brown seems to be satisfactory.

Notice the finish on the oiler body compared to the gate which is smooth.  Because the sharp corner on the hex is impossible to machine in a mold,  Marvin cut a graphite so an EDM could finish the cavity and make a sharp corner.  This also left a very nice finish on the surface which is copied exactly in the wax.

The gate used for wax injection was left long so the foundry could also use it for attachment to their tree when casting.  It will be cut off after casting as it will not be required as a chucking lug.

My favorite foundry, Schuber & Sons, in City of Industry, California, has closed because of health reasons.  I have sent sample waxes to several more foundrys and perhaps will find one that will do quality work.

We need a free machining brass, like alloy 360, because this piece has many tiny, intersecting holes.  Not sure what alloy I can get because most foundries use silicon bronze which pours easily.  It is really tough and needs sharp tools to machine.  You handy at sharpening #54 drills?  I can't either.

I will get enough castings to try, you need to think of some vise soft jaws to hold them at the correct angles.

This will be easy once we figure it out....

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on November 17, 2015, 05:17:21 PM
I don't know if this will be any help, but, there is a very old foundry in Clarksville, Tn that does a lot of work for the Civil War crowd. I've no t personally had any work done there, but, a friend of mine drives from Virginia for their service. clarksvillefoundry.com

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on November 19, 2015, 03:20:43 PM
Cletus, Thank you for the lead on a great foundry.  They appear to do interesting, good quality work.  I contacted them and they do not do investment casting.  They may be useful for sand cast projects and they will consider short run items.

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on November 20, 2015, 12:39:44 PM
You could have had these  made by Shapeways  by just uploading an STL  file.  Was that a consideration?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 06, 2016, 12:10:36 AM
Thanks for all the nice comments guys,

Seems that there is always something getting in the way but we do have some nice 360 brass castings to play with. One of the foundries that Roland tried; made these castings which look wonderful. I havenít had time to do any work on them yet; but hope to in the very near future.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_008_zps7a6z08p6.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_008_zps7a6z08p6.jpg.html)
There is going to be a lot of work and different operations completing these little guys.


Kirk, I hadnít initially thought about Shapeways and that may have been an option. It is kind of funny they call the bronze parts ďprintedĒ but they are really investment castings just like these. They do print the waxes though. It would be fun to have some made to compare but from looking at the web site it seems that it would be costly to get a couple of them made. Does anybody have any experience with Shapeways, cost and small parts? It would be interesting to see if they would accept waxes and only do the casting.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 06, 2016, 12:38:58 AM
They look great.

The only experience I've had with Shapeways is with some sinter plastic. So I can't comment much other than I know a couple of fellows who use them and are satisfied.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 06, 2016, 12:42:42 AM
Those look great Dave for casting. Were they made by lost wax method? They look like some kind of valve.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 06, 2016, 01:03:59 AM
Thanks Zee and  Don

Don, Yes it is kind of a valve; they are the lower castings for a 4 post drip oiler. If you go back to about post #328 that is where it all started.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 06, 2016, 01:06:11 AM
Yea I remember now, it has been a while so forgive me.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 06, 2016, 01:09:44 AM
Those do look very nice Dave. Good detail too!! Hope they machine as well as they look but can't imagine why they wouldn't...keep us posted.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on January 06, 2016, 08:49:52 AM
Some really nice castings. Very well done.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 06, 2016, 11:47:05 PM
Achim & Bill thanks for the nice comments and continuing to follow along.


A while back I made the flame arrestor housing for my engine based on patent drawings. The difference between mine and the original is Iím using sintered bronze for the elements instead of stacked screens.


The idea behind the arrestor is that if a flame passes through due to a backfire there is a huge amount of surface area that the flame needs to work its way through. This will cool the flame to the point that it can no longer sustain combustion and goes out.


Wayne Grenning did some testing of this type of material when he built the vapor carburetor for the Daimler experimental engine that he restored. He literally had combustible vapor being pushed out of the carburetor and burning. The sintered elements kept the fire from working its way back into the carburetor. This test was filmed from a safe distance and the fire was lit remotely. This was after many hours of work went into creating the carburetor; he was will to risk all his work because he wanted to be sure that it would be safe to run indoors around people.

My system will actually have 3 separate elements. Two in the arrestor and one in the check valve assembly which has not been completed yet. So here a few pictures of completing the flame arrestor.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_011_zpsqocjq6ng.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_011_zpsqocjq6ng.jpg.html)
First the body parts were bored for a press fit of the sintered material.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_012_zpso0ydexfs.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_012_zpso0ydexfs.jpg.html)
Pair of pneumatic mufflers were chosen to be the donors for the elements.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_013_zpsb1fsfejn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_013_zpsb1fsfejn.jpg.html)
The mufflers were parted off to the proper length.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_014_zpsr0stlhrq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Flame%20Arrester_014_zpsr0stlhrq.jpg.html)
Then pressed into the upper and lower housings. When the housing is screwed together there is a space between the two elements.

This build is probably going to start jumping around somewhat because Iím working on different things at the same time; trying to get this project running and finished.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: smfr on January 07, 2016, 01:45:12 AM
That's an interesting use of a neat material! Still following, and admiring your work, Dave.

Simon
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 30, 2016, 01:09:44 AM
Hi Guys

Thanks for checking in Simon, I appreciate it.

I have been trying to get an update posted recently and extra time has been pretty hard to come by. I have made a little progress on the oilers; and have some pictures to share. Not the greatest photos but hopefully ok.

I designed and printed a couple sets of soft jaws that would cover all the different operations on the oiler castings.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_009_zpsdmvlxms6.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_009_zpsdmvlxms6.jpg.html)
First up the large hole where the sight glass retainers fit, needed to tapped. I dropped a 7/32Ē end mill in the cored hole to true it up then followed with a #2 reamer and then tapped 1/4-32 all the way through.
The cored holes were slightly oval and the end mill helped get things round enough that I could them ream them.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_010_zps31nw9a7t.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_010_zps31nw9a7t.jpg.html)
Brass sleeves were turned and pressed into the threaded holes; a stepped mandrill was turned and used to press the sleeves and insure they were centered from side to side in the bore. After pressing, a little drop of wicking Loctite was added on each side to help seal everything up.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_011_zpshuvxpv1n.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_011_zpshuvxpv1n.jpg.html)
Here are the castings after installing the sleeves. The sleeves kept me from having to thread up to the shoulder.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018b_zpstttf19ev.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018b_zpstttf19ev.jpg.html)
Here is a cutaway of my CAD model showing the next challenge. A port needs to added between the sight glass area and the back side of the stop valve. The port will be drilled from the bottom of the stop valve boss up into the sight glass area. Then a brass plug pressed in fill the hole.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_012_zpslv6ar65u.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_012_zpslv6ar65u.jpg.html)
The soft jaws hold the casting at the proper angle for drilling. The hole was spotted with a 1/16Ē end mill to make a small flat; then center drilled and drilled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_013_zpshuuieg0q.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_013_zpshuuieg0q.jpg.html)
Roland sent me a few of these brass rivets that were just the right size to plug the hole drilled with a #53 drill bit. The rivets were annealed to hopefully keep the drill from wondering when the stop valve hole was drilled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_014_zpskizzqtso.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_014_zpskizzqtso.jpg.html)
I had calculated the exact length needed to pretty much fill the hole and after drilling would leave the short passage open. I wanted to get as much material in the port as possible to keep the drill from wondering as it passed through. I decided to leave the rivets long so there was something to hang on to. A small line was cut in the lathe so I would know how far to insert the plug; also the oxides were polished off at this time.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_016_zpsubth8wru.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_016_zpsubth8wru.jpg.html)
Here are the installed plugs. I was able to grab the rivet in the vise and wiggle the casting on to it; making sure to stop when the line contacted the casting. Loctite was also added to the plug before pressing it into place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_017_zpsd7m8kz43.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_017_zpsd7m8kz43.jpg.html)
A pair of side cutters were used to nip off the excess plug material.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018_zpsveibejvq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018_zpsveibejvq.jpg.html)
Then carefully belt sanded close to the casting. Using a magnifier and needle files the plugs were filed to the original contour of the castings.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018a_zpscqpzxdtz.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_018a_zpscqpzxdtz.jpg.html)
Time to set some tools for the next two operations.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_019_zpsuiyxzc9t.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_019_zpsuiyxzc9t.jpg.html)
Again the soft jaws were used to hold the casting at the proper angle so the stop valve boss was square to the world. The center of the feature was indicated in and the tools set to the top of the part.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_020_zpspnwfm5bh.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_020_zpspnwfm5bh.jpg.html)
I was having so much fun I forgot to take any pictures. The boss was center drilled, then drilled with two different diameters; one that goes all the way to the vertical center of the casting and the larger diameter that get tapped and also forms the seat for the valve. By looking at the CAD cutaway you can see that the depth of the seat needs to be held pretty close as there is not much wiggle room there.
The boss was also chamfered and the threads milled on at this time. I had the CNC stop centered over the hole and the last step was to put a spring loaded center in the spindle and tap the 3-48 threads for the stop valve.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_022_zpsvjicve37.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_022_zpsvjicve37.jpg.html)
The next operation was to finish the pipe threads and lower port where the oil comes out. The first operation was to drive around the boss with an end mill to square up the small radius left from the mold. Then the chamfer was milled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_025_zpsplfvzgnb.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_025_zpsplfvzgnb.jpg.html)
The port was spotted and drilled. Again the drill depth needed to be correct and required a little tweaking of the code to get it spot on. I actually did both operations on a couple parts (stop valve boss and lower boss) to make sure the holes were going to come out correctly. I was quite happy when they came out just like my CAD model.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_023_zpsomxlnz0c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_023_zpsomxlnz0c.jpg.html)
The next step was to mill the threads; I decided to go with ľ-32 straight threads as my CAM program wonít generate tapered threads. I fiddled with the thread depth until I got a nice fit on some of the PM Research cast fittings.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_027_zpsglnossxw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_027_zpsglnossxw.jpg.html)
This is where Iím at so far on the oilers. Iím pleased with how things are progressing. Next I need to start thinking about the features of the upper section of the castings.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on January 30, 2016, 01:19:13 AM
Your work always amazes me.

What are the soft jaws made of? You say they were printed. ABS?

I was having so much fun I forgot to take any pictures.

Oh? Oh really? Nah...I won't say anything.  ;D
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on January 30, 2016, 01:23:18 AM
Great work!!! Very inspiring!   :ThumbsUp:
Thank you very much for sharing.  :cheers:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on January 30, 2016, 01:46:19 AM
Another fine example of swarfless machining,  however,  I did spot a few flakes in a couple of the pics  :slap:. . BTW, the hand is way too clean  :stir:. Are the printed soft jaws split to clamp the part or what holds the part in them? Also, what's the procedure for using the Interapid to pick up a center punch mark?  Good to see you keeping busy and back on the build. 

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on January 30, 2016, 05:15:39 AM
Never knew that sintered material ever existed.  Did you get it from a metal supplier or did you cannibalize it from something else?

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on January 30, 2016, 12:36:49 PM
Dave, excellent work. Those oilers really look nice.

Is Roland selling those castings? I'd like a few for my Pacific build.

Also, could you give some details on the thread milling? I think you are using BobCam, I've been wanting to do a bit of thread milling myself. What kind of tool path are you using?

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on January 30, 2016, 01:01:33 PM
Nice work.

For the diagonal plugged hole, why not a straight hole from the bottom that intersects both the slanted passage and the main cross passage?

If you want 1/16-NPT threads to be thread milled, a tool from onlinecarbide.com is not expensive.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 30, 2016, 01:11:20 PM
Dave, interesting use of 3D printing for that fixture. Looks to have worked out very well too. Those are nice looking parts.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 30, 2016, 04:11:01 PM
Dave your way to cool buddy. A great example of using soft jaws to manipulate material for working on it. Very nice work buddy and I agree with Cletus, your hands are way to clean. ....... :praise2:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on January 30, 2016, 05:49:53 PM
Just amazing work there Dave!  Thanks for sharing.
I'm also fascinated by your soft jaws.  Did you tell us about that and I just slept through that part? Looks pretty neat.
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on January 30, 2016, 08:28:23 PM
Hi Dave, an impressive clamping concept is shown there.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on January 30, 2016, 09:21:47 PM
My supposition is that he did a 3D model of the casting and then used the model itself to model negative half molds in each jaw.  Then 3D printed the two jaws.  I know you can do this in Solidworks.

There's a more quick and dirty technique I've been wanting to try.  I have a jar of plastic beads called PolyMold.  These melt at the temperature of boiling water into a gel that can be molded around a part.  Upon cooling it retains its shape.  So I'd take aluminum vise jaws and drill holes for a pair of pins; these keep the plastic from moving in the jaws when cool.   Mold the plastic  around the pins as well as the part.

When I saw this plastic demonstrated on youtube, it was used to clamp a thin knife blade.  When clamped the guy in the video picked up the knife by the handle and lifted the vise with it.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 30, 2016, 11:22:50 PM
Thanks guys, for all the nice comments and following along with my rather slow progress; I really appreciate the support.
Another fine example of swarfless machining,  however,  I did spot a few flakes in a couple of the pics  :slap:. . BTW, the hand is way too clean  :stir:. Are the printed soft jaws split to clamp the part or what holds the part in them? Also, what's the procedure for using the Interapid to pick up a center punch mark?  Good to see you keeping busy and back on the build. 

Cletus
Eric; might have been an optical illusion here, I was just sweeping the OD of the boss to find the center.


Never knew that sintered material ever existed.  Did you get it from a metal supplier or did you cannibalize it from something else?

Vince
Vince Iím not exactly sure what you are asking here. Are you referring to the brass castings or the soft jaw material?


Dave, excellent work. Those oilers really look nice.

Is Roland selling those castings? I'd like a few for my Pacific build.

Also, could you give some details on the thread milling? I think you are using BobCam, I've been wanting to do a bit of thread milling myself. What kind of tool path are you using?

maury
Maury Iím still using Bob CAD so I would think the tool paths would be similar to your program; I guess Iím assuming your version supports thread milling? Itís really pretty easy to just go through the wizard and fill in the blanks. I cut top down so it would be climb milling. I did have to tweak the depth of thread to get a nice fit; but ended up being pretty close to the published depth for that pitch. Probably has some to do with the flat on the tip of the thread mill.

Iím not exactly sure what Rolandís plans are at this point (or if there are any); will have to check and see.

Nice work.

For the diagonal plugged hole, why not a straight hole from the bottom that intersects both the slanted passage and the main cross passage?

If you want 1/16-NPT threads to be thread milled, a tool from onlinecarbide.com is not expensive.

Kirk; as usual for me Iím just trying to follow what the original manufacture did. The oil needs to be presented to the back side of the stop valve so that is can be shut off. If you were simply to drill up from the bottom into the sight glass area how would the stop valve be able to shut off the oil flow? You can see the tapered seat in the cutaway where the stop valve seats.

Thanks for the tip on the thread mills; I will file that away. There has been times in the past where I could have used one for 1/8 NPT. The 1/16Ē would be too large for this project. ľ MTP would be just right; thatís why I decided to just go with the ľ-32 straight thread.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_029_zpsvwoyarip.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_029_zpsvwoyarip.jpg.html)
Here are a couple shots of the soft jaws


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_028_zpsy2lcoq4t.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_028_zpsy2lcoq4t.jpg.html)
Kirk hit the nail on the head; I copied the 3d body casting and placed each one in space where I wanted it; then created the two jaw plates over the top of the casting models. By not merging any of the bodies I ended up with 6 separate bodies. Then the castings were used as tools to cut the cavities in the jaw plates.

The jaws were run on a SLA (Stereo Lithography machine). The SLA is uses a laser to cure liquid resin and is much more accurate than most FDM type 3d printers.

Thanks again everyone,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kuhncw on January 31, 2016, 04:09:05 PM
Dave,

Thank you for spending the time to post such a detailed build thread.  Your photos really help show how you make setups for the machine work.

Perhaps I've missed it, but what camera and lighting are you using.

Chuck
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 01, 2016, 01:18:20 AM
Hi Chuck

Thanks for the kind words.

In the first part of the Pacific build I was using a Cannon point and shoot digital camera. I received a Nikon Coolpix P530 last year as a 35 year anniversary gift from my employer; I just love it and It's macro capabilities are great. I turn off my machine task lamps for shots on the machines and never use flash. The camera does a good job of dealing with the florescent lighting; but with no flash it ends up with a very slow shutter speed (1/30 sec). so I usually try to brace the camera against something to help keep it steady. I need to do what Stan did and make an adapter for my magnetic base.

I also use Infran View (a free program) to crop and resize my pictures before posting.

Thanks again for the nice comments.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kuhncw on February 02, 2016, 02:10:33 AM
Dave,

Thanks for the information.

Chuck
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on February 04, 2016, 06:06:52 PM
Maury, these are exactly the oilers that should be on your Pacific.

We have given thought to making a kit for our 4-post oiler.  The only parts not already in your scrap box are the casting and the glass.  With plans and proper tools, a patient, careful machinist could produce spectacular oilers for his engine.

Morrison and Marvin (http://www.morrisonandmarvin.com/)  has been offering an exact Quarter Scale copy of the American #2 oiler ever since the Quarter Scale GADE became available.  To make the glass for this oiler it was decided to use acrylic tube but it was not available in the correct size.  We solved that by purchasing a tube with the correct ID and machining the OD, then re-polishing the acrylic so it was clear.

This 4-post oiler caused us to rethink how scale oilers are made.  Glass must be used because it looks like it should.  We special ordered a very thin Pyrex tube and bought a diamond saw to cut it square.

We are going to machine a very limited amount of 4-post oilers for our own engines because they are so time extensive with all the tiny parts and tight tolerances.  This will be a one time run and if some are left over we would be inclined to sell them.  The rest of you may want to build your own after Dave finishes the drawings.  This would be an ideal project for the Mini Lathe machinists.

I will attach a picture of the American #2 Oiler so you can compare the simplicity against the 4-post oiler.

Roland

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on March 13, 2016, 06:44:15 PM
Dave, since you have had so much fun making brass chips, pretty soon you will need some glass tube for the reservoir.

Lacking equipment and experience with glass I proceeded to treat this special order thinwall Pyrex tube like a bar of hard steel and cut it with a rough diamond wheel..  After cleaning up the shards I ordered a nylon 5C collet and bored it to 5/8 diameter to fit the tube.

Then I obtained a fine diamond saw blade that is .010 thick and adapted it, by making flanges, to my toolpost grinder.  Then with slow feed and application of water, results were much better.  I cut more glass than you have castings so now you have no excuse.

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 14, 2016, 12:11:03 AM
Roland,

Nice work on the glass cutting apparatus; I understand that cutting Pyrex tubing isn't always as easy as it may seem. Looking forward to getting the glass for my oilers.
I have made good progress on them and need to carve out some time to post an update.

Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 29, 2016, 02:50:55 AM
Hi Guys
While Max has been making good progress on his Otto & Langen I have been continuing to work on the oilers; I have been making some good progress and need to try to catch up on my updates.

After finishing the lower end of the oiler bodies it was time to start working on the upper end. There are several areas to deal with here. The bosses for the metering valve and lower plate need to be threaded. The drip tube needs to be machined and pressed in place and the ports for the vent tube also need to be added.

Below is a cut away drawing that shows how involved this part of the machine work is. You can see how the oil would flow down through the port behind the metering valve. Then down through the metering valve when opened and into the drip tube.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Cut%20Away_zpsugj84zbn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Cut%20Away_zpsugj84zbn.jpg.html)
Parts that are pressed in are colored in red; the drip tube and the vent plug. The drip tube had to be machined and pressed in place before the metering valve hole could be put in.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_031_zpsa3qpo2mq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_031_zpsa3qpo2mq.jpg.html)
Here are the drip tubes before being pressed into the oiler bodies.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_032_zpsm0dhjqhw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_032_zpsm0dhjqhw.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the plugs for the vent port. If you look at the cut away drawing you can see the cross hole the is sealed by the threads of the lower plate. The original casting had some coring that would have been rather difficult at this scale. But they did do some rather fancy drilling to get it all to line up and work.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_033_zpsjbyiprth.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_033_zpsjbyiprth.jpg.html)
Three holes in the top of the oiler body have been drilled; the one on the right feeds the oil down to the metering valve. The center one is where the vent tube will be installed and the one on the left is where the vent was drilled down into the sight glass area.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_034_zpsuc4mlc3c.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_034_zpsuc4mlc3c.jpg.html)
One of the .046Ē plugs is carefully started.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_036_zps9zpu5erd.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_036_zps9zpu5erd.jpg.html)
Then a little Loctite is added for good measure and the plug is pressed down flush with the oiler body.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_030_zpsyzh6lgwa.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_030_zpsyzh6lgwa.jpg.html)
Here are the oiler bodies with all the machine work completed; only the vent tubes need to be made and installed.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on March 29, 2016, 04:37:33 AM
Very impressive work Dave!  :ThumbsUp:
Those are some tiny little parts. This is watchmaking territory! 8)
Fantastic! Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on March 29, 2016, 05:05:10 AM
Just like your nuts, just beautiful work Dave........ :cheers:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on March 29, 2016, 06:11:36 AM
Hi Dave, fantastic and really small.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 30, 2016, 12:17:34 AM
Yogi, Don, and Achim; thanks for checking in and the nice comments I appreciate them.

Work continues with the upper and lower plates for the glass. Zee is going to give me hell because I forgot to take any pictures of the first operation. Pretty simple really just some turning and boring and part it off. During the 1st operation the hole was drilled with a ľĒ carbide spot drill which happens to be the correct size for the 9/32-32 thread.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_037_zpsenbhkadv.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_037_zpsenbhkadv.jpg.html)
The plate was turned around and held in a collet; then the tap was run through. Also the hole is counter bored slightly for clearance as was the original. This is because the thread doesnít got clear to the bottom on the mating parts.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_038_zpsnfgyzdqr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_038_zpsnfgyzdqr.jpg.html)
The plate is faced to proper thickness and a radius tool is used to form the contour. There is a little blend between the large radius and the top; it was carefully filed and sanded in.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_039_zpsscfxmhmt.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_039_zpsscfxmhmt.jpg.html)
The lower plates were screwed and Loctited to the body casting. Care was taken to insure the vent ports did not get plugged with Loctite. After the Loctite had set the soft jaws were used to hold the assembly for machining the profile and drilling the holes. A left hand helix end mill was used to keep from unscrewing the plate from the casting.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_039a_zpsryks8bev.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_039a_zpsryks8bev.jpg.html)
For the upper plates a mandrill was turned up and held in a V block.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_040_zpsdmzcsthx.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_040_zpsdmzcsthx.jpg.html)
The blank was held onto the mandrill with a cap screw and washer.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_041_zpst2vybo9k.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_041_zpst2vybo9k.jpg.html)
The left hand end mill was also used here to machine the profile.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_041a_zpsm6uuvf0i.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_041a_zpsm6uuvf0i.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the bodies as they are today.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on March 30, 2016, 12:30:21 AM
Beautiful work on those Dave, and talk about some small fiddly parts...wow!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: terryzilla on March 30, 2016, 02:00:51 AM
Dave,   

Great work as always.
Do I see swarf?   For a minute I thought the post was from someone else.   :) :) :)

Terry
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on March 30, 2016, 02:41:52 AM
Zee is going to give me hell because I forgot to take any pictures of the first operation.

No way. I fear the retribution.  ;D

Amazing work Dave. Makes me question whether I'll ever get to that level.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 30, 2016, 02:47:22 AM
Bill, Terry, Zee; thanks for the support and following along with this multi year project!

Terry I'm sorry; things got carried away and I forgot to remove the evidence. I will try to do better next time.

Zee, you let me off so easy; I'm surprised!  :lolb:

Thanks again guys,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on March 30, 2016, 06:01:16 AM
Dave,
You're work always amazes me.  I love to watch you work.
Thanks for taking the time to share. I always learn something.
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 31, 2016, 01:50:04 AM
Kim, thanks for checking in, and your kind words.

Much appreciated,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 06, 2016, 02:04:32 AM
Hi Guys


Next up is the fill plug; this is a machined brass piece that gets a nice wood knob attached later on.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_042_zpsttz3akfa.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_042_zpsttz3akfa.jpg.html)
First the stock has two diameters turned and also the chamfer for the thread. Then it is parted off a little long to have a chucking lug for the next operations. The larger diameter is where the hex will be cut.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_043_zpsq1f6gplx.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_043_zpsq1f6gplx.jpg.html)
After parting off, the piece is flipped around and the chucking lug is turned down to its final size. Part of the chucking lug will be included in the finished piece.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_044_zps6lq8ggdy.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_044_zps6lq8ggdy.jpg.html)
Using a hand ground HSS lathe tool bit the relief is machined.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_045_zpsdlkxa3gs.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_045_zpsdlkxa3gs.jpg.html)
Here are the 4 finished blanks ready for the mill.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_046_zpsoq73i9h3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_046_zpsoq73i9h3.jpg.html)
Using a collet fixture the 9/32-32 thread is milled and the hex also milled in the same setup.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_047_zpslkxdwdtg.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_047_zpslkxdwdtg.jpg.html)
Back in the lathe the chucking lug is cut down to the finished length.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_048a_zpsihwj63cc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_048a_zpsihwj63cc.jpg.html)
Using the same collet fixture the top end of the plug is machined; the two small pins will engage in holes in the knob and the 1-72 threaded hole in the center will be used to hold the knob in place.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on April 06, 2016, 02:20:46 AM
 :ThumbsUp:

And I still like that table top.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 06, 2016, 02:24:01 AM
Thanks Zee!

Yes pretty hard to beat a good ole solid maple work surface.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on April 06, 2016, 04:00:19 AM
Dave,

I don't drift over to these threads like yours too often, since they're so far over my head. However, I must say that I really like the small parts you just made.

Also, I just saved the pic of the bit you ground to make the reliefs. I have some blanks and want to make one of those. It'll be my first tool grinding experience.

Jim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on April 06, 2016, 05:32:59 AM
Hi Dave, perfect as usual.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on April 06, 2016, 06:29:07 PM
Beautiful work Dave,  even the swarf looks good . I like the maple tops too,  they are kinda like blue jeans,  they look better with some wear to them  :ThumbsUp:.

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on April 06, 2016, 09:19:27 PM
Dave that hand is way to clean buddy need a little grease or something on it. Kind of make look artistic........ :lolb: you know I am still bragging on your nuts to....... :lolb:
As usual top notch work buddy...... :ThumbsUp:

 :popcorn:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on April 15, 2016, 02:48:32 AM
Dave,
I must admit that since I've been laid up and not supposed to be gripping with my right hand I've had a bit more time on my computer. I realized that while I was focused on my own project I completely missed you're Pacific build, to my loss. I've only caught up to page 9 :( but I'm working my way through. Wow! keep up the good work. I enjoyed the bit about pouring babbot bearings.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on April 17, 2016, 01:06:42 AM
Hi Art how is the finger healing?

Thanks for perusing  through my marathon Pacific build; I never intended to go this long but that is kind of the way my projects turn out. I have a few more engines (well a lot more)  that are calling my name, but I'm committed to the Pacific until it is complete; I'm hoping for this summer or early fall but we will see about that.  :lolb:

This project has/had a couple diversions that ended up being major projects in their own right. The Goulds pump and the 4 post oilers (both of which will help complete the model); have been a huge amount of work. Thanks Maury for the help with the pump project and Roland and Marvin for the help on the oiler project.

This is also the project that started the whole Dave Otto's nuts thing.

Achim, Eric, & Don, thanks for your continued support; I appreciate it.

Jim glad you stopped by; please don't be shy. Hopefully my ramblings may give you at least a couple of ideas; I'm not an expert by any means I just use what I have learned and what works for me.

Thanks again guys,
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on April 17, 2016, 03:51:14 AM
Dave,
My finger is doing well. It has been quite difficult to stay out of the shop. I have six programs setup to machine the cooling fins & I & E ports on the side of the head because I'm not supposed to grasp things with it. I need to drill the holes on the fixture to mount the head on the 4th axis but it will have to wait. At least I'll have NAMES and a weeks vacation to distract me. I've got to admit a Z incision looks ugly and don't want another.
Enjoying your build & they're right you take great pictures.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 16, 2016, 12:03:12 AM
Hi Guys,
Wow where does the time go? It has been a month already since my last update.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_049_zpsulvujhk2.jpg)
Starting work on the main stop valve spindle; first it is faced and turned to the major diameter of the part.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_050_zpsv3wnsypt.jpg)
Next the smallest diameter is turned.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_051_zps6pmwquan.jpg)
And before the part gets too flimsy the point is added.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_052_zpszc6pirgj.jpg)
Then the rest of the valve is turned.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_053_zps0u9alz3l.jpg)
The decorative radius is added using a form tool.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_054_zpse4djldil.jpg)
The 3-48 threads are added using a tailstock die holder.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_055_zpsjz6dftdv.jpg)
Then it is parted off leaving enough material to finish the other end.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_067_zpsu1efg2gi.jpg)
The valve is finished the same as the fill plug; a 1-72 drilled and tapped hole and two 1/16Ē posts that will fit into holes in the wood knob.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_057_zpsd3p2axhy.jpg)
The smaller metering valve is made much the same way as the stop valve. I started out by turning the point first using a boring bar on the back side running the lathe in reverse.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_059_zpsuoj0ujfn.jpg)
Using the same tool the rest of the turning operations are completed.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_060_zpsgao6eunb.jpg)
The 2-56 thread is also added using the tail stock die holder.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_061_zps8kxsfh7k.jpg)
And then parted off.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_068_zpsskrzzxhv.jpg)
After the valve was flipped around and faced to length is was set up and squared in a collet block to drill and ream the cross hole.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_069_zpskikdu4qt.jpg)
A vise stop was used to reference the end of the valve.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_070_zpszagxamkh.jpg)
And the hole was drilled and reamed for a press fit of the 1/16Ē cross pin.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_071_zpsakd9ftq7.jpg)
The cross pins were turned with a dome on each end (like the original) and pressed in place.


Next up I will continue with the machining of the two wood knobs and hardware.
Thanks for checking in,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on May 16, 2016, 01:31:44 AM
Wow. I'm at a loss for words. Fine work.  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on May 16, 2016, 01:36:21 AM
Me too Zee.  About the only thing that I could add is : talk to your manicurist,  the cuticles need a little more work  :lolb:, as far as the machining : It's so good it's just stupid  :cheers:

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: crueby on May 16, 2016, 01:40:03 AM
Incredible fine details on everything. Excellent!!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on May 16, 2016, 05:43:58 AM
 :popcorn:

Great parts as usual.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jschoenly on May 16, 2016, 06:33:39 PM
Beautiful oiler parts!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on May 17, 2016, 12:47:30 AM
Somehow missed your post yesterday Dave. Lovely work as always!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on May 17, 2016, 12:58:44 AM
Somehow missed your post yesterday Dave. Lovely work as always!!

Bill
I second that Dave.......... :cheers:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 17, 2016, 01:03:20 AM
Thanks for all the very nice comments everyone; I appreciate them all.

Hopefully I'm not boring everybody to tears; I'm getting close on the oilers, then I will be back to work trying to finish the engine and display stand.  I am looking forward to seeing the oilers mounted on the engine.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on May 17, 2016, 01:57:22 PM
I have to laugh, that tail stock die holder is a work of art also. The rest of your work is like music for the eyes.
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on May 17, 2016, 02:04:39 PM
Always learning something new from you Dave....Nice set ups!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on May 18, 2016, 07:00:10 PM
Dave, great pictures and nice parts.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 22, 2016, 12:11:27 AM
Mosey, Dave, & Achim thanks for the support and nice comments.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 26, 2016, 01:17:55 AM
Hi guys,
Here is an overdue update on the oiler project.

The 4 post oilers have two wood knobs; both are different sizes and each one different top to bottom. Actually the large knob is asymmetric and the small one is symmetric. I wanted to see if I could machine these on the CNC mill as opposed to other methods that were considered.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_072_zpsuj3z3kak.jpg)
Roland found a source for some nice African black wood remnants; these were small but just right for some oiler knobs. Black wood is extremely dense and will not float in water. It is very much like ebony and is an interesting material to machine; it is so heavy the small chips that come off just fall and lay there; no dust to speak of. To start out the wood was cut into a ľĒ slab on the band saw


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_073_zpsuzbp7hh9.jpg)
After taking a skim cut with a shell-mill, the blank was taped down to a fixture plate. Part of the first operation was to drill dowel pin holes that will be used to locate the stock for the second operation.

The first operation included the features that will locate and secure the knob to its respective brass part. The knobs were roughed and finished down to just a little past the midpoint.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_081_zpsmbeg1ocd.jpg)
After the first operation was completed the stock was flipped over on the pins; taped down and faced to thickness. Then the top profile roughed and finished; a 1/16Ē flat carbide end mill was used for the roughing pass and a .030Ē carbide ball end mill used for finishing.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_074_zpsvahmdzpi.jpg)
Small webs were created on the solid model to help retain the knobs in the parent stock  as the final material was machined away. Here the knobs have been roughed and the finishing pass has started.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_075_zpsm8wutwsg.jpg)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_076_zpsjxuutqwy.jpg)
The combination of double sided tape and the webs worked great. The webs are only .02Ē thick where they meet the rim of the knob. I thought that I would need to use a tiny razor saw to remove them from the stock; but they easily punch out using only finger pressure.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_080_zpspnn6xtqy.jpg)
To keep the run time reasonable I used .005Ē step down on the finishing pass. I had planned to sand them anyway. They were mounted on a mandrill in the lathe and sanded to a nice finish; then a Danish oil to finish them off.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_079_zpswee9w1rp.jpg)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_077_zpslsexpjua.jpg)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_078_zpsahphw7kd.jpg)
Here are a few shots of the finished knobs mounted on the stop valve spindle and fill plug.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave



Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on June 26, 2016, 01:39:26 AM
Those are beautiful Dave. Will look great on the engine!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on June 26, 2016, 02:14:30 AM
Hi Dave,
 Those are works of art in there own right! Hopefully you will post a picture of the full size & scale oilers when finished, I'm guess that if you didn't have something to compare against you wouldn't know which was which!

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on June 26, 2016, 02:53:23 AM
The knobs turned out fantastic Dave! Well done!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
I like that you are thinking outside of the box, and use different methods. It's very inspiring!   :NotWorthy:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on June 26, 2016, 01:54:25 PM
Absolutely awesome.
Very beautiful.

 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Mosey on June 26, 2016, 02:26:30 PM
Dave,
How did you tape them and what kind of tape?
Mosey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jschoenly on June 27, 2016, 02:55:28 PM
WOW!  Its so cool to watch this level of detail come together!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on June 27, 2016, 07:30:00 PM
Old pal, my hat is off to you :cheers:, those knobs are just so pretty it's stupid good :NotWorthy: :praise2:. Your dad is looking down at them and grinning :old:

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on June 27, 2016, 07:55:56 PM
Hi Dave, I do like this wood knobs. Excellent Job.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on June 27, 2016, 09:48:23 PM
As always top notch work Dave.......... :ThumbsUp:


Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 28, 2016, 12:35:19 AM
Hi guys,

Wow thanks for all the very generous comments; I really appreciate everyoneís support and that you are still following along with me.

Kerrin, if you go back and look at post 332 there are some pictures of the original full sized oiler. When I get the little guys finished I will be sure to take a picture with both of them together.

Mosey; here is a link to the tape that I have been using.
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/65364630
I guess the main key is to have everything vary clean; I wipe the fixture plate and stock down with 90% isopropyl alcohol. The tape is applied to the stock and then placed on the fixture; locating on pins or against stops if required. Then the key here is to really press your stock down onto the tape; a dead blow hammer works good for this or for small thin parts a roller can be used to roll the stock down.
Donít be bashful you really need to pound the parts down good to insure a strong bond. I have a 5 pound Lixie dead blow with a real soft squishy face that works great for pounding stock down on the tape.
The tape in the above link holds real good but will not tolerate any oil or coolant. This is one nice thing though; when you are finished with your job you can hose it down with some alcohol and give it a few minutes and it will come right up. This tape has a plastic carrier that has a constant thickness which makes it nice. It also doesn't leave any sticky or gooey residue.
3M also makes this tape with a paper carrier; it tends to have stronger bond and is more tolerant to liquids but is harder to remove the parts when complete.

Eric, I think about Dad often and how nice it would be to show him my projects and progress; but thatís life I guess; thanks for your thoughts. He did get the see the Pacific and pump mostly complete and that was nice.

Thanks again guys, I have a few more parts to share and will try to get another update posted in a day or so.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Hugh Currin on June 28, 2016, 02:02:28 AM
Dave:

Very nice work and also nice photos. Beautiful. That's a lot of handles, just how many engines are you making?

What CAM package did you use the the handles?

Thanks.

Hugh
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 28, 2016, 02:16:48 AM
Hi Hugh

You can never have too many knobs! :lolb: Actually I needed to make good use of the wood and some of them are going to friends.

I'm using version 28 of Bob CAD; it is a capable program but not nearly as friendly a Master CAM X19 that I use a work.

Thanks for the complements.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 06, 2016, 02:15:15 AM
Hi guys

Here are a few pictures of some of the last little details to finish up the oilers.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_083_zpsqxmihxtr.jpg)
The sight glass retainers were threaded in the lathe and after the front chamfers were put in, they were parted off. To keep from having to do a second operation in the lathe, the back chamfer was also put on before the retainer was parted.
The screwdriver slot is being milled using a .03Ē carbide end mill and collet fixture.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_082_zpsckz0ig8h.jpg)
A pair of retainer nuts ready to be added to the oiler.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_085_zpssarmltiv.jpg)
The vent pipe is .062 K&S tubing and while the originals were threaded I chose not to go down that road. A 3/32Ē collar was turned and pressed on the bottom end of the vent pipe which will press into the oiler body.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_084_zps9ebravbi.jpg)
To keep the bends the same I designed this little 3d printed hand bender. I winged it on how much over bend would be needed to account for the spring back of the brass tubing. I got within a couple degrees and after a CAD tweak and running another set of parts, they were right on.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_086_zpskwmbx2nv.jpg)
The studs that make up the 4 posts were cut to length and threaded 0-80; I used 1/16 brass welding rod and while they look a little rough in the picture they do polish up nicely.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_087_zpsgnq2yf2o.jpg)
The nuts that hold the top cover on, are a flat top acorn nut. A piece of 0-1 tool steel was used to make the cutter and after setting it on a compound angle for clearance; the profile was milled using a .015Ē carbide end mill.
After hardening and stoning the top of the form tool; I was very pleased how it performed. The tool cuts the top, 2 radii and the very small bevel on the top of the hex.

The nuts were first drilled, chamfered, and threaded using a roll form tap; then parted off. Then the blank is screwed onto one of the studs held in a collet and screwed up against the collet for the length stop.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_088_zpsagcnvzca.jpg)
Here is an assortment of completed nuts; letís hope Lincoln doesnít sneeze. :lolb:

Getting close to assembly time.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on July 06, 2016, 02:25:45 AM
Those are teeny Dave. The is some nice micro machining...just incredible!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on July 06, 2016, 02:36:27 AM
Impressive small parts Dave! That's watchmaking territory...  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
I love your printed bender!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 06, 2016, 02:51:08 AM
Bill, Yogi,

Thanks for checking in and the nice comments; I guess when you have to start using tweezers to assemble parts you know they are getting pretty small.  And these are huge compared to what some guys work on; I don't know how they do it.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on July 06, 2016, 02:53:40 AM
That's pretty small in my book Dave!  Or wait... do you have one of those giant novelty pennies?  :Lol:

Amazing work Dave.  Love seeing those itty bitty bits you're working on. And the photography is amazing too!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: terryzilla on July 06, 2016, 03:00:03 AM
Dave,

As usual you work it beautiful, impressive and creative.    Like the 3D bender tool.   Keep it up.

Terry
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: sshire on July 06, 2016, 12:14:53 PM
Absolutely astounding and beautiful.
Can't ever fault Dave Otto's nuts.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: gbritnell on July 06, 2016, 01:02:29 PM
Excellent work Dave! It's the small bits and pieces that add so much to a build.
gbritnell
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on July 06, 2016, 01:12:57 PM
Ok, here's the guy for the Patek build :lolb:  Vern, you're right, the boy is a master when it comes to his nuts. Absolutely beautiful Dave :NotWorthy:

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 06, 2016, 05:25:29 PM
Yup! Just down right good thinking and excellent work bud and I am still bragging about your nuts........ :ThumbsUp:

 :cheers:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on July 06, 2016, 08:07:42 PM
Hi Dave, a very nice bender and some really tiny parts.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 08, 2016, 12:58:33 AM
Thanks for all the kind words guys; as always I really do appreciate them.

Things are pretty crazy right now but I'm still hopping the have the oiler part of the Pacific project finished up in a week or two.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on July 20, 2016, 12:51:36 PM
Lovely work as usual, Dave! The 3D printed bender is a nice touch too, and definitely logged for future reference  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 01, 2016, 11:56:21 PM
Hi Dave good to hear from you and Iím glad that you are still with us.

I have finished the oilers for my Pacific engine!  :whoohoo:

This little mini project has been lots of fun and presented some challenges along the way. Itís pretty rewarding to be able to handle a part and say to yourself, wow I made that?

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_089_zpsptcg87p6.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_089_zpsptcg87p6.jpg.html)
Using a good straight on photo of the original cover as a drawing template; CAD line work was created to be used for engraving. This was scaled down to the proper size and reproduced on the model covers.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_091_zpsenmukkjl.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_091_zpsenmukkjl.jpg.html)
There are 38 individual parts in each oiler. Everything has been cleaned, polished and ready for final assembly.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_094_zpswi55xebr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_094_zpswi55xebr.jpg.html)
Finally mounted on the engine!


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_095_zpsbesciqvb.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_095_zpsbesciqvb.jpg.html)
In this shot if you look close you can see the grain in the beautiful African Blackwood knobs.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_093_zpsvx6buifl.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_093_zpsvx6buifl.jpg.html)
I decided to reduce the size of the piping down to 3/16Ē from ľĒ. The ľĒ seemed to add too much bulk to the assembly. Looking at some photos of a restored original, this is the way it was plumbed. I have seen models done both ways and at this time I think that I prefer the smaller piping. The fittings came from Cole's Power Models many years ago and required a couple hours work to make them presentable. PM Research does not sell the reducing couplings.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_092_zpsqhwis0fc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_092_zpsqhwis0fc.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of them in my hand for a size reference.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_096_zpsq656mtwl.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_096_zpsq656mtwl.jpg.html)
Just for grins here is the family shot.


I know it looks close but there is still much work to be done. The proper vapor carburetor needs to be made; along with the muffler, water system and display base. I will keep plugging away at it and hopefully get it done eventually.

Thanks for checking in guys.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on August 02, 2016, 12:06:54 AM
Those oilers are really impressive Dave.  :praise2: There are a lot more parts for one oiler than for any engine I've built so far.  :shrug:

Jim

PS: I went to the Steam-up last Sat. Didn't run across your friend. First time there and it was very impressive. Especially now that I understand a little about the workings of steam and hit and miss engines.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on August 02, 2016, 12:07:29 AM
By golly that's just the prettiest pair of little fittings I've ever seen! Outstanding work Dave, just outstanding.

Congratulations!! 

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on August 02, 2016, 01:08:00 AM
Dam Dave, your work is better looking then factory parts buddy and the family shot is just awesome. Those oilers show true craftsmanship, I want to grow up to be like you...........I..........like......... :Love:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: rmw on August 02, 2016, 01:58:39 AM
Dave, your work is extraordinary.
Greg
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on August 02, 2016, 03:21:12 AM
Dave,
I don't want to be left out of the crowd. Those oilers look fantastic. The family shot is inspiring.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on August 02, 2016, 05:36:15 AM
Wow Dave!  Excellent work, as always!  I love the African Blackwood knobs.  That's yet another amazing little detail.  Along with the engraving of course.  Just amazing!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on August 02, 2016, 07:15:27 AM
Hi Dave,
 You are the man! Those are just beautiful, too nice to put oil in.

I take it that you did the lettering on an engraving machine? How tall are the letters? Looking forward to further installments

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on August 02, 2016, 07:50:36 AM
Hey Dave, nice oilers  8)

Do you realise that the first post mentioning these oilers was a year ago. I must get my skates on I wouldn't want people accusing me of taking as long making my Orphans as someone took making two oilers . Happy birthday oilers  :lolb:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on August 02, 2016, 12:38:20 PM
Having seen the oilers as a WIP at NAMES, I can tell they're works of art. 
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on August 02, 2016, 07:23:51 PM
Hi Dave, fantastic. I like your work in all these fine details very much. Very nice oilers and an impressive family shot.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on August 02, 2016, 07:48:28 PM
There is absolutely nothing else I can add to the accolades on the extremely beautiful work, so, had any good IPAs lately ? :lolb:

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on August 02, 2016, 08:13:02 PM
Great job Dave, seems a shame to get them all oily :-[
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Twizseven on August 02, 2016, 09:10:29 PM
Absolutely stunning work, both the oilers and the engine.  The fabulous photography really shows the detail to its best.  The engraving is just the icing on the cake. Well done. :cheers:

Colin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on August 02, 2016, 11:55:30 PM
Gorgeous!!!  :praise2:

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 03, 2016, 12:08:45 AM
Wow thanks everyone for all the very nice comments; I really do appreciate them.

Kerrin, the engraving was don on my CNC mill using a spring loaded engraving cutter; the letters are about .04" tall.

Jo it is completely coincidental that I posted this update on the 1 year anniversary of staring to talk about these on the forum. I have said before that my projects get measured in years and I never have calmed to be a fast worker.  :lolb:  After all it is about the journey correct? at least it is for me; but I sure hope that it doesn't take another year for me to finish my engine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_097_zpsrb8dwpmr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/4%20Poat%20Oilers/Oiler_097_zpsrb8dwpmr.jpg.html)
These beauties were also created at the same time to be used on a future project.  ;)


Eric, Boo Koo from Mother Earth Brewing and Interurban from Fremont Brewing are both pretty darn good! Oh, and Dagger Falls  from one of our local breweries, Sockeye.  :lolb:


Thanks again guys; now that I know that Jo is keeping tabs on my build time I need to try to stay more focused.   :lolb:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Ramon on August 03, 2016, 08:56:07 AM
Dave - I have to confess I have only just looked into this thread for the first time and only at the last three pages at that but - WOW  :o what can I say - absolutely SUPERB. The whole engine is stunningly impressive but the work and the end result in those oilers is just awesome  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: Congratulations Dave on such a fine piece of work all round.

Time? Who cares about time when you end up with something like this. I remember reading something a long time ago by some fine aircraft model maker (can't remember who) who, when asked about his attention to detail  said "it's that last ten percent that counts" - well, in my book, you've certainly confirmed that indeed.

As my old friend Don 1066 would say - "I like"   :praise2:

Kind Regards - Ramon

(last seen shuffling to the workshop shaking head, muttering must try harder)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on August 03, 2016, 01:20:10 PM
WOW, what more can i say? I see builds like this and it's such good inspiration to keep pushing on to new heights of detail. Well done, Dave  :ThumbsUp:

(Yes, still here, and plugging away on my long term projects...  ::) )
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 04, 2016, 12:52:01 AM
Ramon, thanks so much for the kind words; they mean a lot coming from such a talented guy like your self.
I do what I can, but there are a lot of other things just waiting to vacuum up my spare time; happens to the vast majority of us here I'm sure.

Dave, thanks also for your nice comments; I appreciate them.
I'm glad to see that you are still plugging away on the steam engines and the latest progress looks fantastic.
I can't remember the name of the pumping engine just now; but I'm looking forward to seeing more progress on that one as well.


Thanks again guys,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on August 04, 2016, 08:58:55 AM
Those oilers look awesome Dave.

Love the family shot also.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jschoenly on August 04, 2016, 01:58:15 PM
WOW.  Those are truly beautiful creations.  Well done!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 04, 2016, 11:31:27 PM
Hi Vince & Jared,

Thanks for checking in and the nice comments, I appreciate it.

Dav
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on August 05, 2016, 03:26:38 AM
Dave,
Now that the oilers are finished whats next on the agenda? I must admit that chasing a bat out of the house wasn't on my agenda but fortunately it clung to my bike tire and let me carry the bike outside. No I didn't use a tennis racket. I will check under the yew bush by the door in the morning and hope he is gone. He seemed to be drinking water of the clipped branch on the step. It is mosquito season after all.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 07, 2016, 01:19:01 AM
Hi Art

I have been noodling around some ideas for a water tank that will serve as a reservoir for the pump to draw from. The pump will circulate most of it's water back into the tank and some of it will pass through the engine to cool it; that's the plan anyway. I think that next I may try to get some work done on the tank. It is one of the several big parts left to make. Now I just need to carve out some time. :wallbang:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on August 07, 2016, 03:16:30 AM
Dave,
Carving out time seems to be the hard part.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 09, 2016, 02:29:55 AM
Hi guys


I have been thinking about a water tank for my Pacific engine display. I need a tank to supply water for the Goulds pump and also supply cooling water for the engine. I wanted to create something that looks like it is from the same era of the engine. I like the looks of the rectangular riveted tanks that I found while poking around on the net. I have been searching and collecting pictures for a while now.


I have played around with some designs and needed to find one that I could build. I did find one that I liked and modeled it in Geomagic tweaking it to my liking. It needed to fit within the constraints of my display area; so it wonít be an exact scale model but a representation of a large tank scaled down to fit within the display. If it were to be full scale it would be larger than the engine.


The tank will be made from .036Ē galvanneal steel with brass and steel flanges. It will be of riveted and soft soldered construction.
Hopefully I can create a functional tank that will complement the engine and pump assembly.



(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank001_zpsjdxgxgwi.jpg) (http://s1236.photob111ucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank001_zpsjdxgxgwi.jpg.html)


Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on September 09, 2016, 03:22:09 AM
I like the tank, Dave, but steel? Even galvanized....  I would think copper or brass would hold up way better.... but that's just me.

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on September 09, 2016, 03:25:24 AM
Dave,
Good to see that you're making progress. The last tank I made that had to hold anything was the gas tank on the Upshur vertical. I made the pieces but my dad sweated all the joints. He's been gone for 4 years now, & I'm on my own. Your tank looks like lots of surface to solder, good luck. Scaled I think it will fit right in with your engine.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on September 09, 2016, 10:28:39 AM
Hi Dave,
Oh goody this should be an interesting build!
Why note build the tank out of stainless? I'm looking at doing the tanks for my loco out of stainless, current thinking is to have the plates water cut, the guy reckons he can even do the rivet hole, 3/32", I haven't talked to him about doing the holes in  stainless angle yet! My dad had to make stainless troughs for a mate of his awhile back & soldered them, the right flux & it was piece of cake, well for him, so I was thinking of sweating the edges, then riveting, & a bit of heat to run the solder?

Here's a link on how Nelson made his tanks for his Shay loco... http://www.nelsonslocomotive.com/Shay/Tanks/TanksI/TanksI.htm

His site is worth a read lots of good ideas form his making of the Shay & Heliser, both to Hozo Hiraoka design scaled up to 7 1/2". Nelson did the tanks slightly different, he had plastic welded inner tanks.

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on September 09, 2016, 01:19:37 PM
If it is caulked with soft solder that will flow over any cut edges and if wiped off cleanly will retail the galv look which would be typical of the original, you will need to wipe the solder over the rivit heads too as these tanks were made and then the whole thing dipped.

Brass would be easier to make it out of but then you face the job of getting a fake galv look. If you intend to paint it then brass sheet and copper rivits would be easiest to work thats how I have done traction engine tenders.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v156/jasonballamy/Fowler%20A7/PICT0114.jpg)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Ian S C on September 09, 2016, 03:41:19 PM
Quite a lot of those galvanized tanks came into NZ in the1850s, people packed all their goods in them for the long sea voyage from Britain, and a good many of them are still around serving as   water tanks, I think the average size is 500 gallons.  It's probable that the tanks found their way to Australia in a similar way, you'll probably find one on a sheep station, next to the windmill.
Ian S C
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 09, 2016, 04:21:39 PM
Thanks for the comments guys.

Pete; brass or copper would certainly would be easier to work with but I guess I'm trying to stick closer to the materials that would have originally been used. As Jason indicated the tank would have been hot dipped galvanized after fabrication. My plan is to use the galvanized sheet and after soldering there should be very little if any exposed bare metal. I'm sure the it will out last me and the next owner.

Kerrin; thanks for the link there is some interesting reading material there.

Jason I do plan to paint the tank when completed; I don't think I could ever come up with a fake galvanized finish that I would be happy with.

More to come,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on September 09, 2016, 04:46:54 PM
Jason I do plan to paint the tank when completed; I don't think I could ever come up with a fake galvanized finish that I would be happy with.

Hot dip it is a (leaded) soft solder tank  ;)

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 09, 2016, 05:20:48 PM
Jason I do plan to paint the tank when completed; I don't think I could ever come up with a fake galvanized finish that I would be happy with.

Hot dip it is a (leaded) soft solder tank  ;)

Jo

Not something easily done in these parts.  :lolb:
I'm not sure that I want to invest in the equipment to do it myself.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on September 10, 2016, 12:55:25 AM
Galvinized metal has been used in these parts for everything from livestock and potable  water tanks to roofing. I even have my grandfather's water cooler that was galvinized.  Back in the day the roofing contractors did your roof and guttering.  If you had money,  you bought copper gutters,  the rest of us poor turds bought galvinized,  however,  the installers were masters at soldering both.  The rivet and sweat joint was very common,  the solder sealed and the rivets prevented it from twisting loose.  My grandfather was a builder and I remember watching them solder the joints,  in the field and at their shop.  It was all done using an "iron "; I never remember seeing a torch.  See what memories you have brought back Dave :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:.

Cletus

PS: like those geese do you : if you or any of your pals play golf,  ask how they are liking them  :naughty: :mischief: :lolb:. Ask me why I ask  8)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 10, 2016, 04:31:20 PM
Hey Eric, thanks for checking in.

The tank parts have been punched out and folded up; I decided to make the outer shell from two pieces as it would have been difficult to do it in one piece on our press brake with available tooling.

The bottom in recessed so the rivets are not in the water space. To hopefully make assemble easier; I chose to install rails around the rim of the tank that will be riveted in place. This will give the top something to sit on and when completely assembled will appear that the top has been riveted in place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank002_zpstm9af0oo.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank002_zpstm9af0oo.jpg.html)
Tank Shell, rails and mounting feet. The feet are made from heavier .06Ē material.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank003_zpspuj9jijg.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank003_zpspuj9jijg.jpg.html)
Tank rear panel, top and bottom.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank005_zpshz5cq95v.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank005_zpshz5cq95v.jpg.html)

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank004_zpsjuaul79k.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank004_zpsjuaul79k.jpg.html)
The corners were filled in with some silicon bronze using a TIG welder. Iím not the best welder around so my coworker did this for me.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank010_zps9k2wsonm.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank010_zps9k2wsonm.jpg.html)

If you are wondering about the extra set of holes in the bottom they are because I decided after I had punched out the parts I wanted to increase the size of the bottom outlet flange. The flange will cover the smaller hole circle. I also added a second flange the well serve as the water return from the engine.

Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 10, 2016, 05:32:45 PM
Wow Dave, you already have a lot of it done!!  Looks great so far too!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on September 10, 2016, 08:32:49 PM
I'm keeping my eyes on you pal. :lolb: I'm thinking with that many rivets properly set,  no solder may be needed.  Maybe just a fine line of JB before you set the rivets :shrug:.

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on September 11, 2016, 08:48:44 AM
Cletus,
 Thanks for the tip! :ThumbsUp: hadn't thought to use JB weld to seal the tank seams, it's got be easier than solder.....providing it doesn't go off too quick! It looks like it has finally come available here

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: stevehuckss396 on September 11, 2016, 10:50:36 AM


Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave

With another flange inside the tank and a piece of tubing bent to suit, you can have the water return to anywhere you would like.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Ian S C on September 11, 2016, 01:55:43 PM
I still solder spouting,  for the joint I drill it for steel Pop rivets, tin the joint, rivet up then sweat the joint. Plumbers, and roofers these days just use rivets and RTV.
I seem to remember that the old galvanised water tanks had angle iron in the corners, and flat plates (probably around 10 to 12SWG) riveted on the angle.  The lid about 18" dia cast iron disc, locks with a short turn into the cast iron hole in the tank.
Ian S C
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 11, 2016, 02:01:41 PM
Dave, exceptional sheet metal work, or did you CNC those parts? Very nice.

Lost my computer so I've been off the grid for a while.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 11, 2016, 04:41:35 PM


Having the engine water return and suction inlet for the pump in the same place might not have been such a good idea.

Dave

With another flange inside the tank and a piece of tubing bent to suit, you can have the water return to anywhere you would like.

Hi Steve
That would be a good option. My initial plan was to tee the engine water return into the pump supply line under the display base. The pump would have most likely been able to suck air in do to the way I had planed to plumb the engine. There will be an open funnel on the engine where you will be able to see the water leave the engine and trickle into the funnel on a stand pipe. This is the way a lot of the large stationary engines were plumbed.
I think by just by giving the engine return water its own entry point will solve this problem.

Maury; Yes the sheet metal parts were punched out on our CNC punch at work and also folded up on our CNC press brake. The punch in an interesting beast to program and run. It sure is nice to be able to have access to this equipment for personal projects.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 19, 2016, 02:16:58 AM
Hi everyone.
Work continues on the water tank.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank009_zpselipcuwm.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank009_zpselipcuwm.jpg.html)
A set of brass flanges were made; two of them go in the bottom of the tank. One serves as a supply to the pump and the other is a cooling water return from the engine. The third is for the tank drain valve.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank011_zpsujwzg9az.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank011_zpsujwzg9az.jpg.html)
Starting the assembly; the rails that support the tank top are riveted in place. The copper rivets were annealed and pickled in Muriatic acid, then cut to length using a wood chisel in a fixture. Setting tools were made (and modified more than once) to set all the rivets in the tank.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank012_zpslkhpchs4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank012_zpslkhpchs4.jpg.html)
The four rails have been riveted in place; along with the upper rivets for the mounting feet.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank013_zpsgzkego17.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank013_zpsgzkego17.jpg.html)
The two flanges located on the tank bottom have been riveted in place.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank014_zpsjrmeqm5i.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank014_zpsjrmeqm5i.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the other side.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank015_zpsw88orfvn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank015_zpsw88orfvn.jpg.html)
Next the drain flange was installed.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank016_zpsw4rrp579.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank016_zpsw4rrp579.jpg.html)
Next in line was the rear tank panel.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank017_zpsgkkb3mqe.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank017_zpsgkkb3mqe.jpg.html)
Here is an inside shot of the set rivets; once theyíre covered in solder and the tank top installed this side (hopefully) will never be seen again.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank018_zpsupm2sdlj.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank018_zpsupm2sdlj.jpg.html)
The galvannealed steel was not as easy to solder as I had hoped. I think it goes through some post treatments that make it good for painting but not soldering. I picked up a small brick of Sal Ammoniac that made tinning it possible.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank019_zps6w8xrpnw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank019_zps6w8xrpnw.jpg.html)
I found that the soldering went better if the joints were tinned before assembly. I was able to get the rails and corners soldered after some experimenting; but I needed to come up with a better plan for the tank bottom. Pre-tinning was the solution. Each inside surface along with each mating surface on the tank bottom were pre-tined prior to assembly.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank020_zpspkja7i8l.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank020_zpspkja7i8l.jpg.html)
The tank just after soldering the bottom in and before any clean up; all the solder joints except for the top are inside the tank and wonít show after assembly.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank021_zpsep9fmmsh.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank021_zpsep9fmmsh.jpg.html)
The best part is that doesnít leak! :whoohoo:


Thanks for checking in.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on September 19, 2016, 05:57:53 AM
Beautiful work, as always, Dave.  And your rivets look simply stunning!  I don't know how you do it.  Can you post a picture of the setting tools you made? I'd love to see the tools you used, how many, etc.

It looks great and doesn't leak! What more could you ask for? :)
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 19, 2016, 12:58:41 PM
Dave, incredible workmanship! I'm trying to get a sense of the size, is it about 6" x10" x8" high?
I hope to see your Pacific project at NAMES next spring, it'll be a great hit.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on September 19, 2016, 01:15:16 PM
More stunning work, Dave - well done!!

(think I need to work harder on my riveting...  :-[ )
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on September 19, 2016, 07:49:06 PM
Hi Dave, great job and perfect as always.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 20, 2016, 12:31:00 AM
Every rivet is just perfect...amazing work Dave. The whole tank just looks fantastic!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on September 20, 2016, 01:59:58 AM
Dave,
I have to say that tank looks great, and I'm glad I didn't make it cause it wouldn't look nearly as good. I still have a partially complete chip tray on my lathe, and it doesn't need to hold water, only chips. :wallbang:
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 20, 2016, 11:36:51 PM
Thanks for all the kind words guys. Other than some test pieces this is my first riveting project; so it was a learning experience for me.

Maury the tank must look bigger in the pictures than it really is. It is 4Ē X 7Ēand 5Ē tall. I didnít want it to overpower the engine and pump, so it is a much smaller scale version of what it should have been. If it were full size it would have been almost as tall as the engine.

Kim, I learned a lot of what I know about riveting from your Steam tractor build. ;D  While doing some test parts I soon realized the creating a full domed head was going to be quite a challenge. I experimented with different lengths and determined that the full dome head took enough force to form that is was going to distort my relatively thin parts. All of the formed heads are hidden from view so I was ok with not going down that road. Looking at the picture of the tank I was using as a guide it appeared that they just smashed the rivets flat. I think this may be common practice for tinners rivets. I did find that once I got going that by reducing the length of the rivet I was able to achieve a nice, more flat dome; so this is what I went with. On the tank bottom I did just squeeze the rivets flat. This is not an easy area to work in and I guess that if I had taken the time to make a rivet squeezer I may have been able to dome the heads but I would really like to get this project completed someday. I have some pliers that came from my granddad (Plierwrench brand) that the jaws open and close parallel to each other on a rack and pinion. I used these to squeeze the bottom row of rivets; using a snap to protect and form the factory head on the outside and flatten the head on the inside. I will post a picture if you are interested in seeing them.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank022_zps7avlxaau.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank022_zps7avlxaau.jpg.html)
The fixture I used to cut the rivets is nothing more than a piece of CRS milled to the desired thickness with a couple holes drilled in it. A sharp wood chisel was used cut the rivets while using a finger to hold them in place

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank023_zpsafbgy1gz.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank023_zpsafbgy1gz.jpg.html)
The snaps (I guess that is what you call them) were turned from drill rod and used unhardened. The annealed copper rivets are very and easy on tooling. Some of them had to be modified for clearance.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank024_zpsbwzje4n0.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank024_zpsbwzje4n0.jpg.html)
These are the ones that got pounded on with a hammer.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank025_zpszrpaa76g.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank025_zpszrpaa76g.jpg.html)
The business end; the one with the hole was used to make sure the rivet and parts were all where they needed to be. After using this punch or snap I would use the small ball peen hammer to upset the head and tighten everything. Then use the dome snap to finish it off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank026_zpsuvdg3lyk.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank026_zpsuvdg3lyk.jpg.html)
This is my lash up that I used to set the rivets on the inside of the tank.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank027_zpsngjmnkuf.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank027_zpsngjmnkuf.jpg.html)
The snap was offset enough to allow access to rivets that are quite close to the corner. As you can see in the pictures of the snaps there is also one with a hole that was used first.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank028_zpsfff2loqc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank028_zpsfff2loqc.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the tank bottom; you can see how the rivets were flattened on the inside. When starting out I would use a tiny pair of parallel machinist clamps to draw the metal together. One clamp on each side of the rivet; this was repeated until enough rivets were installed to squeeze everything up tight. The rivets were first set with a long pin punch then finished up by squeezing with the Plierwrench.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank029_zpsozbovjb3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank029_zpsozbovjb3.jpg.html)
This is a picture of the tank that I was kind of using as a pattern. If you look close you can see that it appears the rivets on the bottom appear (at least to me) to be flat on the inside.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank030_zpspdk8ndxn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank030_zpspdk8ndxn.jpg.html)
One more shot of the original tank.

Thanks again for all the nice comments.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 21, 2016, 12:34:50 AM
Damm Dave that is some awesome work my friend. The tank turn out great........I .........like........  :Love:


Don.   :praise2:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on September 21, 2016, 05:53:13 AM
Thanks for that excellent write up and all the great pictures Dave.  Very interesting!

As others have told me already, I probably should have used copper rivets like you did here.  Next time, I will.  Your's came out beautifully!  And I'm certain it's the rivets that make all the difference!  :Lol: :ROFL: :lolb: 

You are an amazing craftsman Dave!  Maybe someday I'll work up to your standard!

Thanks for sharing,
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 22, 2016, 12:47:26 AM
Thanks Don & Kim

To finish up the tank I needed to make the lid and its flange.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank031_zpskyrhjles.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank031_zpskyrhjles.jpg.html)
The flange was turned from piece of12L14 leaded steel.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank032_zpslrniqwss.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank032_zpslrniqwss.jpg.html)
Then it was transferred to the mill to drill the holes for the rivets and then parted off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank032a_zpsrutyd3tp.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank032a_zpsrutyd3tp.jpg.html)
 The flange is the same thickness as the sheet metal the tank is made from; .036Ē.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank033_zpssvuxjt6y.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank033_zpssvuxjt6y.jpg.html)
The lid was made in similar fashion; first turning bottom side and parting off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank034_zpsiorrwozw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank034_zpsiorrwozw.jpg.html)
Then turned around and faced to thickness.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank035_zpsgqcytk38.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank035_zpsgqcytk38.jpg.html)
The arms were milled from .060Ē steel sheet; a tab was used to help hold them down to the fixture plate. The tabs were removed after the arms were cut out

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank037_zps3p4f0ghc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank037_zps3p4f0ghc.jpg.html)
Here are the finished arms ready to be silver soldered to the tank lid.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank036_zpsmnx8y5eh.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank036_zpsmnx8y5eh.jpg.html)
A fixture was needed to hold the arms in alignment and properly located on the lid.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank038_zpsbyixh7pw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank038_zpsbyixh7pw.jpg.html)
The lid has been assembled on the fixture and is ready to be soldered.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank039_zpsls3k8qt0.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank039_zpsls3k8qt0.jpg.html)
Here it is just after turning the torch off; Correction fluid was used to keep the solder from making a mess of the lid.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank041_zpsdbtja0t2.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank041_zpsdbtja0t2.jpg.html)
The yoke for the lid was made at the same time as the other sheet metal parts. It was riveted to the tank top using .062Ē copper rivets and also tinned and soldered.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank040_zpsnhjws8jr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank040_zpsnhjws8jr.jpg.html)
The tank top was a nice snug fit inside the tank and sits down on the rails. The lid was fluxed and soldered in place. It was filled to the brim with water and left to sit over night and continues to be leak tight. :whoohoo:

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Water%20Tank/Tank042_zpsyogryvwy.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Water%20Tank/Tank042_zpsyogryvwy.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the completed tank setting next to the Goulds pump. Its nice to have another piece of the project completed. :DrinkPint:

Thanks for checking in and continuing to follow along with my project.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 22, 2016, 02:10:10 AM
Dave that is a work of art my friend just awesome results.......l.......like........ :Love:


Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on September 22, 2016, 02:48:59 AM
Geez, that's just beautiful Dave!! Super nice workmanship. I've learned a few things here.....

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: terryzilla on September 22, 2016, 03:10:30 AM
Dave,

Looks great.  You never disappoint, both the workmanship and the method of fabrication.

Terry
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: gbritnell on September 22, 2016, 04:43:41 AM
Outstanding work on the tank and fittings Dave. It really adds character to the pieces.
gbritnell
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on September 22, 2016, 01:29:31 PM
WOW, what else can I say - a truly beautiful assembly  :Love:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on September 22, 2016, 07:09:38 PM
Hi Dave, very nice pure art.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on September 23, 2016, 12:13:41 AM
Fantastic work on the tank Dave!   :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
Excellent craftsmanship!
It's coming together nicely!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: joe d on September 23, 2016, 01:32:53 AM
I always look forward to more of this project, and you never disappoint...

Outstanding  attention to detail Dave!

Joe
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 24, 2016, 01:23:06 AM
Don, Pete, Terry, George, Dave, Achim, Yogi, & Joe

Wow, thanks for all the very nice comments guys; I really do appreciate them.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on September 24, 2016, 03:04:48 AM
Dave,
I inherited my dad's oxy-acetylene torch but I couldn't do that without extra parts to fix what I screwed up. I'm sure I could do it eventually but it would take a certain amount of practice on unimportant parts. Your tank looks beautiful, a work of art.  :praise2: Cant wait to see the finished product!
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on September 24, 2016, 03:33:06 AM
Your tank came out very nice Dave. Also great documentation and pictures.

Jim

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 24, 2016, 03:02:41 PM
Can't add to what has already been said Dave...just fantastic work!!

BIll
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jschoenly on September 26, 2016, 02:46:11 PM
Said many times, but WOW.  That is just fantastic work and I really hope I'm able to appreciate this in person sometime!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 11, 2016, 12:07:32 AM
Hi Guys

I have needed to get an update posted on the Pacific but first want to say thanks to Art, Jim, Bill & Jared for your comments and taking the time to follow along with my project.


Next; I decided to work on a muffler for the engine; there are no plans for a muffler and I have never seen a picture of an original, either in the flesh, or on copies of original advertisements. Maybe Pacific never offered a muffler for their engines.
Not being one that enjoys listening to the bark of a straight pipe all day long at a show; I decided early on that my engine would have a muffler. I wanted to create something that looks like it belongs on the engine; so using modern pipe fittings wasnít going to work.


Hiding in this nice US made ľĒ elbow; hopefully is the start of the base casting for my muffler.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_002_zpsobcrezkh.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_002_zpsobcrezkh.jpg.html)
The elbow was Loctited to a brass nipple and indexed so that both sides could be surfaced. Each side was surfaced using a 3/32Ē carbide ball end mill.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_003_zpsuzccpy3o.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_003_zpsuzccpy3o.jpg.html)
Here the first side has been completed; then it gets flipped over and the other side gets the same treatment.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_004_zpsidpz0mce.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_004_zpsidpz0mce.jpg.html)
Here is the elbow after surfacing both sides. Fortunately there was enough material on the fitting to allow this to be done.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_005_zpstbel5qoc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_005_zpstbel5qoc.jpg.html)
Before removing the nipple from the elbow it was put in the lathe, dialed in, and a register machined to accept the muffler mounting flange.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_006_zpszssucj6m.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_006_zpszssucj6m.jpg.html)
The elbow was heated to release the Loctite and removed from the nipple and shown here with the start of the flange.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_007_zpsotxaraon.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_007_zpsotxaraon.jpg.html)
The elbow and flange are silver soldered together.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_008_zpsflxfbm9n.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_008_zpsflxfbm9n.jpg.html)
After a little clean up, the assembly is remounted to the pipe nipple and indicated in on the mill.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_009_zpsusaaycmm.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_009_zpsusaaycmm.jpg.html)
The mounting holes are drilled and the profile of the flange has been machined.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_011_zpstrnj8pa5.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_011_zpstrnj8pa5.jpg.html)
Test fitting the assembly on the engine. I probably used too much solder but it is going to be painted and I wanted a nice fillet.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_012_zpsa686tmce.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_012_zpsa686tmce.jpg.html)
The muffler bottom started out with a 3Ē piece of cast iron bar stock. Thatís what I had on hand and didnít want to wait for something smaller to be shipped in.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_013_zpsiyxkccmp.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_013_zpsiyxkccmp.jpg.html)
The first operation in the mill included profiling and adding the holes.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_014_zps6xmcxaw6.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_014_zps6xmcxaw6.jpg.html)
The piece was removed from the stock in the band saw, then placed in my Sherline 4 jaw chuck. It just worked out that the jaws of this chuck cleared the raised feature on the back.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_015_zpscsxke1a8.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_015_zpscsxke1a8.jpg.html)
The muffler bottom was faced to length and the recess added.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_016_zpsvvkyhnne.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_016_zpsvvkyhnne.jpg.html)
The muffler top was made using a slice of the same 3Ē cast iron material. The top was faced and the recess added.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_017_zpsv4l7wtd9.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_017_zpsv4l7wtd9.jpg.html)
Then it was flipped around, turned to the finish diameter, and faced to length. The holes were drilled after the top was finished in the lathe.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_018_zpsvwt5lem6.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_018_zpsvwt5lem6.jpg.html)
To help reduce the noise an internal baffle pipe will be included. Starting with a ľĒ brass nipple; the diameter was reduced and here the holes are being drilled.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_019_zpsixteqrhs.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_019_zpsixteqrhs.jpg.html)
The pipe was cut to length and a plug silvered soldered in the top; then a hex was added.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_020_zps1pjqzekp.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_020_zps1pjqzekp.jpg.html)
The muffler shell is rolled from .024Ē galvanized sheet metal. I rolled a few test pieces to determine the exact length for a flat pattern that would give me the desired 3/8Ē overlap; and a nice fit in the top and bottom plates. Once the length was determined a blank with the holes was punched.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_021_zpsd9q93xrc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_021_zpsd9q93xrc.jpg.html)
Our small slip rolls at work were too large to roll this little part so I had to purchase a new tool. I really didnít want to take the time to build my own and I didnítí want to spend over a thousand dollars for a set of US made rolls; so I ordered these 1Ē slip rolls from Grizzly. Iím quite happy with them and they work surprising well.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_022_zpscji7wfv3.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_022_zpscji7wfv3.jpg.html)
The new slip rolls made short work of rolling the muffler shell.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_023_zpsddzegrdr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_023_zpsddzegrdr.jpg.html)
Then using some of the snaps and tooling from the water tank project; the shell was riveted together.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_024_zps8n3ld8lq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_024_zps8n3ld8lq.jpg.html)
A proper set of studs and square nuts were machined.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_025_zpsqaqojyh4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_025_zpsqaqojyh4.jpg.html)
Test fit of all the pieces.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_027_zps1ymsftno.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_027_zps1ymsftno.jpg.html)
Here is a shot of the muffler installed on the engine.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_026_zpsbozgsfuf.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_026_zpsbozgsfuf.jpg.html)
And a little different view; Iím really pleased with the way it turned out.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_028_zps3tapabzn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Muffler_028_zps3tapabzn.jpg.html)
The family shot.
I have started thinking about the base to mount all the pieces on; I have some vacation coming up and hope to either get started on the display base or maybe the vapor carburetor.


Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on November 11, 2016, 12:24:36 AM
Well done Dave!!!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
The muffler really looks like it belongs to the engine.
Thanks for sharing your techniques. It's very informative, as always!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 11, 2016, 12:32:32 AM
Poetry in motion Dave, awesome results on all parts. This engine is just gorgeous buddy and will be glad to see it all together on and nice base. Beautiful work..... :praise2:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: gbritnell on November 11, 2016, 12:33:47 AM
I have to agree with Yogi. The muffler looks like something that might have come on the original. Great work as always.
gbritnell
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on November 11, 2016, 12:58:25 AM
Wow...exquisite work Dave. That elbow machined far better than I would have thought too. Just beautiful!!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: crueby on November 11, 2016, 01:30:17 AM
Dang, that muffler came out nice!   :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on November 11, 2016, 02:45:13 AM
Dave,
I think that's an OEM muffler! Wow, that looks great. I think they will be Photoshoping your muffler into the originals, it looks that good.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kuhncw on November 11, 2016, 02:58:36 AM


Beautiful work, Dave.  Thanks for posting the photos as there is a lot to learn from them.


Chuck
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on November 11, 2016, 03:49:43 AM
Another great installment.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on November 11, 2016, 04:41:38 AM
Hi Dave, another perfect made and beautifull detail at this exquisite model.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on November 11, 2016, 06:59:49 AM
Looks good dave, similar to the ones I have done on the IHC and Domestic but I use tube rather than rolling my own. Pity you can't get nice looking elbows we can get brass/bronze ones in 1/4" that look nice and don't need any work to them.

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: sshire on November 11, 2016, 01:21:13 PM
Dave
Absolutely astounding. Magnificent!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on November 11, 2016, 02:33:57 PM
They say some have got it and some don't; you my friend, have it :NotWorthy:. You've mentioned paint a time or two: man with that fit and finish I'd just keep it wiped down like a presentation grade firearm. Putting paint on that would be like painting over the engraving on a nice pocket watch. JMO.

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on November 11, 2016, 02:43:10 PM
Dave, your muffler is another great looking "project within the project"!  :ThumbsUp:

I agree with the others on how it looks just like a muffler that would have been on the original. I also agree with Cletus regarding painting. I'm sure it would look wonderful painted, but it would be stunning left unpainted. IMHO

Jim

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on November 11, 2016, 02:59:09 PM
Amazing work, as always, Dave!
Thanks for taking the time to share your process photos with us.  I always learn a lot reading your thread!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on November 11, 2016, 07:08:43 PM
Wow. That is just a beautiful machine, Dave. Just beautiful...   :praise2:

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 12, 2016, 12:57:03 AM
Thanks for all the very nice comments everyone; I do appreciate them.

Eric I have thought long and hard about paint and the inner me would really like to see it painted; I'm not talking about a dipped in plastic shiny show car finish, but something a little more subdued. I haven't completely made up my mind what I'm going to do but hopefully I won't botch it too bad.
I do like all the bare surfaces like you and Jim; but when these engines left the factory they did have paint on them. :lolb: Even with paint there will still be lots of exposed machined surfaces. Hopefully this engine and display will be kicking around for many years to come and I feel that it deserves a nice paint job.

Jason; are these fittings available online some where? I need some 1/8 NPT beaded elbows for my pump discharge plumbing.

Thanks again guys.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on November 12, 2016, 05:45:09 AM
Awesome Dave, just awesome.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on November 12, 2016, 08:53:49 AM
Dave, the only problem is that ours come in 1/8" BSP which is 0.383OD x 27tpi but this is the supplier I used for the last ones I bought

https://www.ekpsupplies.com/bsp-brass-fittings.html

As you can see from the intake and fuel filler these look nice straight out of the box, the emblem and mould part line can easily be removed. The smaller stuff is PM Research

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v156/jasonballamy/Hit%20n%20Miss/Half%20scale%20Domestic%20Stovepipe/DSC05396.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v156/jasonballamy/Hit%20n%20Miss/Half%20scale%20Domestic%20Stovepipe/DSC05404.jpg)

Even our iron ones look better, this is 1/4BSP still with original GAV finish

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v156/jasonballamy/Hit%20n%20Miss/Half%20scale%20Domestic%20Stovepipe/PICT0353.jpg)

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on November 13, 2016, 10:12:41 PM
Dave, Excellent work, the whole build is a magnificent work of art!
My hope is you will fond a way to get the engine to NAMES next spring and share it
with us.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on November 15, 2016, 01:27:49 PM
As ever, simply stunning workmanship, Dave  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 23, 2016, 06:53:58 PM
Vince Jason Maury & Dave, here is a belated thanks for checking in and your nice comments.
Jason do you think the BSP fittings could be re-tapped to NPT? I need two 1/8Ē beaded fittings for my pump plumbing. I have some bronze fittings that I can re-profile if I have to; but it would be nice to find a couple that wouldnít need so much work to make them look correct.

Another small piece to be made for the engine is the battery saver assembly. This is a set of contacts that are operated by the swing arm; this will keep the ignitor points from sparking on the exhaust stroke.
(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_001_zpsstvuq1vp.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_001_zpsstvuq1vp.jpg.html)
The springs were cut from .02Ē beryllium copper sheet. I also made a couple spares.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_002_zpsvy1ul0py.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_002_zpsvy1ul0py.jpg.html)
A couple hours at 600įF brings the material to a full hard condition and makes them nice and springy.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_003_zpshwafzs5p.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_003_zpshwafzs5p.jpg.html)
The wire connection clamps were turned from brass and get screwed to the contact springs with a 2-56 round head screw. The insulator bushings were turned from linen phenolic


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_004_zpsgq1cqpj4.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_004_zpsgq1cqpj4.jpg.html)
A single contact point was turned from some nickel based mystery metal and riveted in place. This contact opens and closes with no current flowing so Iím not concerned about arcing.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_006_zpsvx1bs1j0.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_006_zpsvx1bs1j0.jpg.html)
Here the assembly is mounted on the engine. I had spot faced the location and taped the hole earlier when I had the engine set up in the mill to mount the bull gear bracket.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_005_zps8xeamn8z.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_005_zps8xeamn8z.jpg.html)
You can see here how the points are operated by the swing arm. This is just the way it was done on the original engine.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_007_zpsw9uumw1e.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Battery%20Saver_007_zpsw9uumw1e.jpg.html)
A different view showing the contact points and tight space in which they operate.



Thanks for checking in,
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on December 23, 2016, 07:21:29 PM
Hi Dave, I do love these details. The entire engine is a masterpiece.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on December 23, 2016, 09:46:31 PM
Dave always outstanding work coming from your stable buddy.... :praise2:

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on December 23, 2016, 07:52:46 PM
Nice contacts Dave

I should think it would be OK to retap the fittings NPT, it's not as though you will be trying to retain high pressures so with a good drop of pipe sealant I'm sure they will hold OK. I'm sure I have done similar on a part supplied with one of the American kits so that I could use my BSP tooling.

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on January 05, 2017, 03:37:24 PM
Looking good, Dave, looking good  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 07, 2017, 12:56:21 AM
Achim, Don, Jason & Dave
Thanks so much for following along and the nice comments; always appreciated.

I will try to get an update posted this weekend.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on January 07, 2017, 11:14:24 AM
Nice work as usual Dave!      Those are great castings!

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on January 07, 2017, 01:53:34 PM
Beautiful Dave, what a gorgeous engine in every regard!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on January 08, 2017, 02:01:38 AM
Fun with the brown stuff!

I wanted the water tank to be mounted on a skid that would represent that it is portable and would have been slid into position under the pump outlet for filling. Then it could be taken to some other location for use or storage. I recently learned that galvanized riveted tanks were used on ships to transport goods and fresh water. There was thread over on Smokestack where they were talking about this.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_001_zpsrzt353w9.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_001_zpsrzt353w9.jpg.html)
All the wood parts for the skid were cut from a piece of fir stair tread that came from an old house that a friend of mine was remodeling. This wood is from the 1930ís.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_002_zpsdltgpehs.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_002_zpsdltgpehs.jpg.html)
On the bottom of the runners Heli-Coils were added for the hardware that will hold it down to the base.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_004_zps44amiqfi.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_004_zps44amiqfi.jpg.html)
All the parts have been glued and screwed together with #2 flat head wood screws. The screws were striped of the zinc plating bead blasted and black oxide coated. I havenít decided if Iím completely happy with the black screws; it will be an easy task to remove it if I change my mind.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_005_zpszmpsjq78.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_005_zpszmpsjq78.jpg.html)
Here are a couple shots after the oil finish was applied.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_006_zpskgknboty.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_006_zpskgknboty.jpg.html)
I decided that it would look more authentic with some proper hardware. I spent a couple days messing around getting the hoisting rings made to my liking.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_009_zpsk5qh5kbd.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_009_zpsk5qh5kbd.jpg.html)
Here are a few shots of the tank mounted on the skid.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_010_zpsicz6mypc.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_010_zpsicz6mypc.jpg.html)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_008_zpsbhlfvvaq.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_008_zpsbhlfvvaq.jpg.html)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_007_zpsan462664.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Water%20Tank%20Skid/Skid_007_zpsan462664.jpg.html)
Next on to the display base.

Thanks for looking in.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on January 08, 2017, 05:37:26 AM
That looks great, Dave!  You're pretty handy with the brown stuff too :)
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on January 08, 2017, 05:43:09 AM
That's fantastic Dave!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
I love the detail with the square nuts and bolts, and the rings. Well done!  :praise2:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on January 08, 2017, 02:09:08 PM
That is some very nice work, Dave!  :praise2:

I loved the story about where the wood came from. I was hauling some scrap lumber, from a house I was remodeling, to the dump one time and saw a pile of bleacher seat wood (clear fir) that had come from the local school. I came home that day with more material in my truck than I took. I made all the window trim for the remodel out of that wood.

Jim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on January 08, 2017, 04:07:53 PM
Damn Dave you talents are not bad a woodworking either buddy! Nice work as usual coming from your stable........I...........like........ :Love:


Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on January 08, 2017, 07:34:41 PM
Hi Dave, just beautiful.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 12, 2017, 11:10:45 PM
Hi guys

Things have been a little crazy lately and I neglected to say thanks, sorry about that.
Kim. Yogi, Jim, Don, & Achim, thanks guys for checking in and all your nice comments. as always I do appreciate them.


I'm going to try to get an update posted in the next day or so.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 90LX_Notch on February 12, 2017, 11:49:19 PM
Looking forward to the update Dave.

-Bob
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on February 13, 2017, 02:56:48 AM
Dave,
You are even good with the brown stuff. :lolb: The skid looks great with the tank on it. I've been busy my self.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 14, 2017, 01:14:16 AM

Thanks Bob and Art.
I have made a start on the display base for the engine & pump assembly. It is probably overkill but I wanted something substantial enough that would maintain the relationship of the engine, cross head, and pump. I didnít want an all wood base that might not stay flat.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_001_zpsowwlbrsr.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_001_zpsowwlbrsr.jpg.html)
I chose to make the base plate out of a piece of 3/8Ē thick cast aluminum tooling plate. I knew where on the plate the engine would be located as well as the water tank. So the engine and tank holes were put in when the plate was machined.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_002_zps5buwrocw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_002_zps5buwrocw.jpg.html)
ĺ X 1/8 structural aluminum angle was added to increase the rigidly of the plate and also serve as a place to mount the wood trim that I plan to wrap around the outside.
Because of the size of the engine and pump, to make everything fit it ended up being quite large 26Ē inches long X 12Ē wide

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_003_zpsqgmr5abn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_003_zpsqgmr5abn.jpg.html)
Six steel legs with rubber feet were added to create some space under the display and give a place to lift from. There is some plumbing and maybe electrics that need to share that space.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_004_zps3amyfyor.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_004_zps3amyfyor.jpg.html)
Once the engine was mounted and squared with the base the exact location for the cross head could be determined. After careful measurement and double checking the cross head hole pattern was drilled and taped.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_005_zpsvmc3bk5z.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_005_zpsvmc3bk5z.jpg.html)
After the crosshead was mounted then it was possible to spot the location of the pump. The pump had to be positioned carefully to keep the piston from hitting either end cover. There is only about .03Ē to spare; I may relive the inside of the covers to create a little more space inside the pump.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_006_zpsxhb95clx.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_006_zpsxhb95clx.jpg.html)
The locations of the pump mounting holes were carefully transfer punched then indicated in before drilling and taping. When I machined the pump base casting I centered the holes on the boss so the dimensions arenít exact; so I couldnít just work from coordinates like on the engine and cross head. Iím pretty happy with it; it all goes round and round and back and forth without any binding.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_007_zpsgaj76yvd.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_007_zpsgaj76yvd.jpg.html)
Next up was to add holes for the piping. After a bunch of mocking up and head scratching I decided where I wanted the supply and return pipes for the engine to be located.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_009_zpshumsu8gp.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_009_zpshumsu8gp.jpg.html)

This brass manifold block will give me a place to attach the 5/16Ē engine piping to and also the tube fittings that are under the base.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_010_zpshymb7x6o.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_010_zpshymb7x6o.jpg.html)
Here it is mounted in place. 1/8Ē NPT fittings will be used for the tube adaptors.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_012_zps193tsyqk.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_012_zps193tsyqk.jpg.html)
Getting all the nipples cut and threaded the proper length took some time and I had to account for the wood that will cover base. Everything is long at this time but when the wood is added all the fittings will pull up closer to the base.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_008_zpsyhnneaxo.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_008_zpsyhnneaxo.jpg.html)
Extra long mounting hardware also needed to be made for the engine, crosshead, and pump; these bolts are long enough to pass through the wood and thread into the aluminum base.

I will try to get a family shot posted in the next few days.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave


Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 90LX_Notch on February 14, 2017, 01:39:55 AM
Wow Dave; that is an impressive base now.  Lookout once it is completed.

-Bob
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on February 14, 2017, 01:58:11 AM
Bomb proof!!!  :Love:

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on February 14, 2017, 05:33:21 AM
At least your family will be safe during an earthquake; you can all duck & cover under your Pacific base!  :lolb:

Beautiful work Dave.  Even theh placement of your pipe fittings look artistic!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: vcutajar on February 14, 2017, 06:02:05 AM
Thanks for the update Dave.

Vince
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on February 14, 2017, 12:46:58 PM
Excellent, and a good way to hide the pipework  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:

What is the taping guide you are using?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: tvoght on February 14, 2017, 02:21:45 PM
Thanks for the update Dave. That is going to be an impressive display.

--Tim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 15, 2017, 12:28:10 AM
Thanks for the nice comments guys.

Roger the tap guide is made my OMW and can be purchased through Little Machine Shop, http://www.omwcorp.com/tapping-block.php
I have one at work and also the one at home, they both get used quite often.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 15, 2017, 01:51:45 AM
I'm watching Dave.

Have to.

Gotta keep an eye on you.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Rivergypsy on February 16, 2017, 01:30:31 PM
Push fit pipework, Dave? I thought you'd have had at least bolted flanges  :ROFL:

Seriously though, excellent work as usual!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on February 16, 2017, 06:14:23 PM
Thank you  :ThumbsUp:  I will have to see if I can find a supplier/agent this side of the pond  :headscratch:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 19, 2017, 06:42:30 PM
Thanks Zee & Dave

Dave sorry to disappoint, I did think about hard plumbing but I wanted something that was easy to service and the push lock fittings and tube will make it easy to drain water from the suction side of the pump. I tend to fuss over things that some people will never see but in this case I took the easy way out.

Next up a clamp was needed to secure the water return pipe to the supply; as you will see in the following photos it would have been standing there unsupported. I have wanted to try 3D printing a punch and die for light gage metal forming and this seemed to be the perfect opportunity.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_013_zpshonolfqg.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_013_zpshonolfqg.jpg.html)
This simple tool was designed and printed the other day. It is sized for .036Ē material with no allowance for spring back.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_014_zps7rbz6cvu.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_014_zps7rbz6cvu.jpg.html)
A strip of stock is laid in place and the punch put in place over the pins.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_015_zpsbymgd68j.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_015_zpsbymgd68j.jpg.html)
A small arbor press was used to do the forming. It takes very little pressure to form this small thin sheet metal. The material was left long to be able to finish folding the ends into the channels of the punch.
After forming the clamp required trimming and some hand work to finish it off.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_016_zpsdw3hykwn.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_016_zpsdw3hykwn.jpg.html)
Here it is installed on the pipe work.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_017_zpsnlknkjho.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_017_zpsnlknkjho.jpg.html)
This picture shows how the cooling water supply and return pipes come from under the display base. The pipes are 5/16Ē OD.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_018_zpsei8bqgpv.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_018_zpsei8bqgpv.jpg.html)
This picture shows how the water is going to get from the pump over to the engine. My plan is, if needed to restrict the outflow from the pump back to tank to force some water up through the engine. It will only need a trickle. The tee fitting is one that I had around and modified it to match the other fittings. The hex on the short nipple will probably be removed on final assembly.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_019_zpsu7snfiom.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_019_zpsu7snfiom.jpg.html)
This picture shows the inlet plumbing for the pump; the pipe and fittings will be painted.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_020_zps9t5pcarw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_020_zps9t5pcarw.jpg.html)
I wanted to use a water return funnel that sometimes you see on stationary engines. Here is the start of the funnel in the lathe. It was first modeled in Geomagic to come up with a desirable shape.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_021_zpsusbb5ajj.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_021_zpsusbb5ajj.jpg.html)
Transferred to the mill where the hex was cut.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_024_zpsme5qehxd.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_024_zpsme5qehxd.jpg.html)
OK well I got busy and forgot to take any more pictures so here it is installed on the engine.

Also note the square socket pipe plug in the exhaust valve chest. The engine needed three of these, two for the valve chest and one for an extra port on the bottom of the cylinder. These plugs were made last weekend but I neglected to take any pictures of their construction.

Soft copper sealing washers have also been made for the intake and exhaust valve caps.

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_023_zpsegoczbsf.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_023_zpsegoczbsf.jpg.html)
The valve will allow control the water flow from the engine.


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_025_zpstcj6vehw.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_025_zpstcj6vehw.jpg.html)


(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_026_zpsipogyl26.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_026_zpsipogyl26.jpg.html)

(http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff451/idahoan_1960/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_027_zpso914wvbo.jpg) (http://s1236.photobucket.com/user/idahoan_1960/media/Pacific%20Vapor%20Engine/Pacific%20Display%20Base/Base_027_zpso914wvbo.jpg.html)
Here are a few family shot pictures; it is getting to be quite a hand full. I need to temporarily seal all the pipe fittings and check out some things on the engine but is getting close to seeing if she will go bang! The bulky elbows on the pump discharge piping will be fixed in the future.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 90LX_Notch on February 19, 2017, 08:24:42 PM
Dave-

Wow, everything looks beautiful mounted on the plate.

Printing the die for the clamp is very slick and the results are very impressive.

-Bob
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Flyboy Jim on February 19, 2017, 09:09:13 PM
Dave, this just gets better and better!  :praise2:

Jim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on February 19, 2017, 09:49:30 PM
Wow wow and wow. Truly awesome.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Fantastic pictures.

And happy about the reminder of using 3D printing.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on February 20, 2017, 02:08:06 AM
Man, wow... Yes, what everyone else said Dave!  Your engine is looking amazing!
I hope they re-institute GEARS this year so I can see your beautiful engine in person!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on February 20, 2017, 02:31:19 AM
Dave,
I really like your clamp bending jig. I think that is one of those things where you need the experience or like me I wouldn't even think of it. It is starting to look a bit on the heavy side, you might need a cherry picker to lift it. :lolb:
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on February 20, 2017, 11:49:22 AM
That's going to be a handful to transport to shows.  Hope to see it in person one of these days.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on February 20, 2017, 11:53:48 AM
Gorgeous Dave. You have really outdone yourself on this one. Every detail is just perfect!!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on February 20, 2017, 05:26:44 PM
An engine like a dream.
Just beautiful.
Your love to the details is remarkable.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on February 20, 2017, 05:44:27 PM
Nice bit of plumbing Dave and I like the tundish (funnel) should come in useful to see how much water is flowing through the engine.

J
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on February 21, 2017, 12:44:45 PM
Stunning, museum quality, and I could go on and on. Builds like this are what should give us mere mortals something to strive for. Can't wait to hear it chooch.

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 21, 2017, 07:13:33 PM
Hi guys,
I wanted to take a minute to tell everyone thanks for all the very nice comments and also for continuing to follow along with my long drawn out project.

Interesting term Jason, I learned something new.

Hopefully it won't be tool long before I can post a video of the first pops and splashes. :Lol:


Thanks again guys,
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on February 21, 2017, 09:18:25 PM
First astragal now tundish.  Jason's words of the month.   :)
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on February 21, 2017, 10:24:50 PM
Damn Dave true art at it's finest buddy! You know .....i..........like.......... :Love:


 :drinking-41:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jeff l on February 22, 2017, 01:50:35 AM
a work of art for sure.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on February 22, 2017, 10:42:28 PM
Thanks Don & Jeff
Much appreciated.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on February 27, 2017, 11:29:30 AM
Beautiful  :praise2:  :praise2: The tools in the background show just how big (and probably heavy) it is  :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on March 01, 2017, 01:30:28 AM
Thanks Roger,

I can still lift it, but it is a handful.


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: rklopp on March 01, 2017, 03:03:09 AM
Dave,

Your work is very inspiring. I can only hope to aim for that level of quality.

Regards,

RKlopp
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 15, 2017, 12:27:17 AM
Thanks for the kind words rklopp, a little belated sorry.

Hi guys, wow where does the time go? I havenít posted anything on my projects since February, I have been busy with other project and more than the usual customer jobs this year. Iím still hoping to get this project finished up by springtime.
Not that I havenít been in this shop (I am most everyday) I just havenít been able to spend any time on the Pacific.

I only have a couple outstanding items to finish up before I can take it down for paint and some brown stuff. One of these items is the belt pulley, the engine doesnít really need a belt, pulley but with the crank shaft sticking out there it was just begging for one. I couldnít find any suitable castings for one so I decided to just make one from scratch.

I liked the size of the Mery pulley but I really wanted a six spoke pulley, the Mery pulley only has five spokes.
The center was made from a slice of 6Ēcast iron round bar and the rim from a piece of 5Ē Sch. 40 pipe.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_001.jpg)
Here the first side of the center is turned.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_002.jpg)
Then flipped around and the other side turned. The hole for the crank shaft is drilled under sized and will be bored to fit after the pulley is assembled.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_003.jpg)
The pipe is bored for a.005Ē to .006Ē interference fit, the width is left a little long so that it can be squared up after assembly.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_004.jpg)
Using soft jaws to hold the center the spokes are machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_005.jpg)
All the spokes have been machined and ready for some fillets.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_006.jpg)
Using a 3/16Ē ball end mill and a Z Level Finish tool path, the fillets were machined on both sides.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_007.jpg)
Here are the parts ready for assembly.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_008.jpg)
The center is taking a swim in liquid nitrogen; the all thread was added for use as handle.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_009.jpg)
The rim was heated to 400 degrees f using a rose bud and checked with a temp stick. The bronze spacer was machined to keep the center in the middle and square. Heating the rim only probably would have worked but using the LN2 gave me an extra .02Ē of wiggle room. The center dropped right in.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_010.jpg)
I was very happy with the results everything ran nice and true, within a thou or two.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_011.jpg)
Once brought to proper width the outside was turned to size and the crown added. Using my CAD software I created a step and cut chart to cut the crown. Working from the center out, each side was roughed out. In this picture the finish work has been started.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_012.jpg)
After the lathe work was completed the tapered key-way was put in using the same tapered bushing and broach that was used on the flywheel. I didnít take any pictures but a proper Gib head key was also made.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Pulley_013.jpg)
Here is the pulley installed on the engine, Iím quite pleased with how it turned out. When the finish work is done it will get a small fillet where the rim meets the center, using some sort of filler.

Well hopefully it isnít another nine months before the next update.
Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on November 15, 2017, 12:42:20 AM
That looks beautiful Dave. The whole engine does in fact. Thanks for the update no matter how long it has been.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on November 15, 2017, 05:06:49 AM
Wow Dave, that really looks nice.
You always seem to have a way to make things look so easy...  Just do this, and that, and bingo, just like that, its done!  I learn a lot by reading your posts.
Thank you for sharing!
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on November 15, 2017, 11:44:34 AM
Where/how did you get the liquid nitrogen?  I was thinking of using dry ice for a similar shrink fit.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 15, 2017, 11:21:51 PM
Guys, thanks for checking in, and the nice comments I appreciate it.

Kirk we have LN2 at work so I just took my parts there to do the assembly; have you checked with your local gas supplier to see if you could beg/buy a small quantity?

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 16, 2017, 12:13:16 AM
Awesome work Dave love how it turned out.... :Love:



 :cheers:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 16, 2017, 12:16:03 AM
Thanks Don!
I'm looking forward to seeing some work come from your shop again??

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 16, 2017, 12:18:37 AM
Thanks Don!
I'm looking forward to seeing some work come from your shop again??

Dave
Yeah Dave I really need to get of my butt and do some work. Been having home projects going on but getting close to completing them so maybe next year I get started again.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 90LX_Notch on November 16, 2017, 12:39:58 AM
Outstanding work with the pully Dave.  The fillets on the spokes really make a difference.  Just  beautiful, if I were currently making the flywheels for Tiny, I would add fillets.


-Bob
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jeff l on November 16, 2017, 01:29:48 AM
outstanding !
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on November 16, 2017, 02:27:57 AM
Dave,
I really love that pulley, I'm going to file away the liquid nitrogen/dry ice idea. It looks like you turned a monster chunk of steel on the lathe.
Don,
Next year is only a month and a half away. We expect to see something soon. :ROFL:
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 16, 2017, 04:32:04 PM

Don,
Next year is only a month and a half away. We expect to see something soon. :ROFL:
Art
Yeah I hear you Art and I do need some motivation thanks.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 16, 2017, 11:41:43 PM
Bob, Jeff & Art, thanks for the nice comments, always appreciated.
Don do you have a project in mind, or one that needs finishing?

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on November 18, 2017, 12:00:23 AM
Don do you have a project in mind, or one that needs finishing?

Dave
Dave I started this Civil War cannon a while back and it need finishing before i make any engines.

Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on November 18, 2017, 12:19:20 AM
Oh, cannon! I love cannon. Large or small, I love 'em all.. but only coal burners!

The techniques needed to make cannon spurred the rest of everything.

That looks like it will be quite proper and complete when finished. Nice work!

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on November 18, 2017, 12:34:33 AM
Looks like you are off to a very good start!
Be sure to keep us posted on the progress.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on April 29, 2018, 10:49:15 PM
Dave, you make everyone involved with the Pacific Project proud.  You got the first set of castings from the Silverton Foundry cast personally by the late George Field.  These were from the matchplates I made using Lester Bowman's beautiful but fragile wooden patterns.

Lester hand drew the blueprints using a pencil and "T" square just like the original.  Going back even farther, it was from Buzz Setler and Larry Snow that I received Pacific factory drawings that were useful in convincing Lester to model a Pacific.

Reading your complete forum is the equivalent of two years of a machining apprenticeship under a Master Machinist.  Your detail is exasperating with spectacular results.

But you are not finished:  look what Jan in the Netherlands has done.  His Pacific runs like a clock and is the utmost in precision and then he painted it and let it weather 100 years to get a perfect patina.

Maybe the most amazing thing is it still runs after it was painted.  All of my projects either run OR they are painted.  Good luck with that.

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on April 30, 2018, 01:11:29 AM
Roland, does there happen to be a video of it running ? Would love to see it if there is one.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on April 30, 2018, 01:36:03 AM
Surely, by now Dave has a video of his engine running.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on April 30, 2018, 07:11:21 AM
Thanks for posting those photos Roland, what a great finish and far nicer than a shiny blinged up engine.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on May 01, 2018, 12:13:41 AM
Roland thanks for the nudge, it's hard for me to believe that it has been almost 6 months since my last update on this project. I have had numerous things taking up my time including the day job.

I was able to spend some time this last weekend working on a battery box design and actually got some wood blanks cut up ready for machining. Maybe with a little luck I will be able to post a video of it running in the near future.

Jan is an exceptional model engineer; he has created one of the nicest models of this beautiful and unique engine. Iím not sure that Iím up to the task of making my engine look 125 years old, but I do have some ideas that donít include shiny paint and polished brass.

Bill, I found a video of Janís engine, hopefully mine will run just a nice. Because of the pump my engine does not have the hit and miss governor.


Thanks for checking in.
Dave

B5XManbBYlo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on May 01, 2018, 12:37:00 AM
Thanks Dave, what a lovely sounding engine. I have no doubt yours will sound just as good even without the hit and miss aspect.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: RolandMM on May 04, 2018, 03:38:00 PM
Dave,  Thank you for answering Bill with a video of Jan's Pacific.  There are other Pacific videos on my website MorrisonandMarvin.com   at   http://www.morrisonandmarvin.com/pacific.php

There is a video of Lester Bowman's prototype Pacific and also one that gives an explanation on Regan's vapor carburetor.

Jan's video shows his Regan carburetor but not close up.  I have a picture of it somewhere and it looks even older than Jan's engine.

Roland
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 23, 2018, 12:47:29 AM
Hi Guys

Well I was thinking that it was about time for my quarterly Pacific update. :lolb:

I have been able to carve out some shop time in the last few weeks to work on the battery box. The battery box is one of the last pieces that I wanted to finish before I pull the whole thing down to complete the wood work on the base and painting of the engine and pump.

I decided to use the same vintage Douglas fir that I used on the water tank skid. This is real nice material that was cut 75 plus years ago. It was salvage from an old house that my friend was re-modeling.

The box was modeled in Alibre design including all the hardware. I did search for some proper hardware but couldnít find anything that I liked, so I decided to make it.
The wood was re-sawn and the blanks band sawed oversized. I donít have any wood working tools so all the wood parts were done on my CNC mill at work.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_001.jpg)
Here are all the pieces ready to be assembled, the display base has already been drilled and taped for the box and the large hole is for the hall sensor connector on the S&S ignition module. All the nail and screw holes were pre drilled to insure alignment and keep from splitting the thin panels.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_002.jpg)
The box was carefully glued and clamped together. The bottom screws to the sides with #2 flat head wood screws and the sides are nailed. I inserted the nails just far enough to align all the parts; then after the glue had set enough to hold, the holes were cleaned out with a drill bit in a pin chuck and the nails pressed into place.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_003.jpg)
I wanted to dress it up by adding some lettering to the lid. Using my hobby vinyl cutting machine the text was designed and a stencil cut. The font I chose matches what was used on some early Pacific advertizing that have; I used some black decal vinyl that I had on hand to make the stencil. Here the transfer paper has been applied to the stencil the letters carefully removed and then applied to the lid of the box.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_004.jpg)
The transfer paper is then removed exposing the wood and the letters sprayed with some rattle can black paint. The sides were also masked with tape to protect from overspray.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_005.jpg)
After the paint had dried the stencil was carefully removed. At this time the letters were very dark and bold. 320 grit sandpaper on a small block was use to carefully sand all the letters down until the wood grain just started to show through, kind of hoping for the old faded look.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_006.jpg)
After all the assembly and painting the wood parts were all treated with linseed oil thinned 50/50 with turpentine.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_007.jpg)
With all the wood parts pretty much finished it was time to get going on the hardware. The hinges and hasp are the same width so I was able to combine some of the machining operations. I didnít take any pictures but as you can see the stock has been thinned down and the boss formed where the pin goes. I decided to cheat a little and just machine everything from solid, instead of forming sheet stock.
In this picture one of the hinge halves is set up to drill for the pin. The one being used for a spacer is a scrap one that the hole wandered.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_008.jpg)
Here one of the halves has been drilled for the pin. I ran a few test pieces and was having trouble with the drill wondering, so I decided to drill half way from each side which worked better. Itís just a hinge after all.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_009.jpg)
This is my set up for slotting the fingers. The shim is removed before the slots are machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_010.jpg)
Here is one of the parts after slotting.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_011.jpg)
All the parts have been slotted and ready for the mounting holes to be drilled and counter sunk for the #1 flat head wood screws.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_012.jpg)
The assembly process begins, 1/16Ē welding rod was polished down for a nice fit in the bore. It was left just a squeak large on the end to be a press fit. The milling machine vise was used to press the pin home after it was cut to length in the lathe. Here the fit is being checked after polishing.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_013.jpg)
All the parts are complete and ready for final assembly. I didnít take any pictures of the hasp catch; but it was pretty simple construction. After the plate was machined the hoop was formed from 3/32Ē stock and silver soldered in place. Left a bit long on the back sided and filed down to the plate.

Below are some pictures of the completed box ready to be mounted on the display base. Iím pleased with how it turned out considering how much I dislike working with the brown stuff.
(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_014.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_015.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_016.jpg)

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_017.jpg)

Hopefully it wonít be too long now and I can post a video of it running. Then the fun begins taking it all apart to do the finish work.
Thanks for checking in.
Dave

Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: tvoght on June 23, 2018, 03:14:42 AM
It was worth the wait for the update, Dave. The box looks amazing.
--Tim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on June 23, 2018, 06:58:09 AM
Dave, that is some really nice work there! The wood, the decals, the hardware, it all looks stunning!

Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on June 23, 2018, 07:18:03 AM
very nicely done Dave.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on June 23, 2018, 09:43:48 AM
Dave,
 Very nice! For somebody who doesnít like working in the brown stuff, you done good!
About the only thing missing is the greasy finger marks... :naughty:

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on June 23, 2018, 08:06:06 PM
Very nice work Dave; Pops would be proud. Kerrin, he doesnít even produce swarf when he machines, no way youíre going to see greasy fingerprints  :lolb:

Cletus
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on June 23, 2018, 08:43:18 PM
That looks great Dave. I hope you're going to stick a plaque on the bottom. Someone down the line will want to know.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Box_007.jpg)

Is that a dimple I spy on the vise?  :mischief:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on June 24, 2018, 04:38:55 PM
Thanks for all the nice comments guys.

Zee, that dimple is a detent stop for a custom vise stop I.m developing. ;)


Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on July 03, 2018, 10:24:21 AM
Very nice work Dave; Pops would be proud. Kerrin, he doesnít even produce swarf when he machines, no way youíre going to see greasy fingerprints  :lolb:

Cletus

Cletus,
Your right I forgot about Daveís swarfless machining! Itís still a very nice box

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: steamer on July 03, 2018, 02:32:43 PM
Thanks for all the nice comments guys.

Zee, that dimple is a detent stop for a custom vise stop I.m developing. ;)


Dave

 :lolb:

I seem to have a multi station version of that stop!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Roger B on July 11, 2018, 08:35:07 PM
What a wonderful box  :praise2:  :praise2:  :wine1:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: jeff l on July 12, 2018, 01:55:02 AM
your work is always top notch .
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 14, 2018, 12:41:22 AM
Thanks Guys, I have had some other work going on but hope to get back to the Pacific in the near future.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on July 14, 2018, 12:50:08 AM
Thanks for all the nice comments guys.

Zee, that dimple is a detent stop for a custom vise stop I.m developing. ;)


Dave

 :lolb:

I seem to have a multi station version of that stop!

That was the first thing I did when I got my mini-mill.
I put two in.
I just didn't know what they were for yet.  ;D
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 14, 2018, 01:53:00 AM
The CNC makes them easy to create, I would think with a manual mill you would have to think about it for a bit,  :lolb:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on July 14, 2018, 02:58:59 AM
The CNC makes them easy to create, I would think with a manual mill you would have to think about it for a bit,  :lolb:

That was the problem. I didn't think at all.  ;D

It just came naturally.  :lolb:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on July 14, 2018, 01:48:50 PM
Beautiful box Dave. Looking forward to the video as well. Love the hinges and Hasp you made too!!

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on July 14, 2018, 04:49:53 PM
Awesome workmanship Dave but did you have to flaunt that .5 inch micrometer at us .....LOL
and you know .......I.........like......... :Love:



 :drinking-41:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on July 14, 2018, 09:39:52 PM
Dave,
That's some great work on the brown stuff. It will be good when you can clear some time to finish it and fire it up.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on July 18, 2018, 12:34:12 AM
Bill, Don, & Art

Thanks for checking in and the nice comments, they are always appreciated. I have been crazy busy lately, hopefully it won't be too long and I can get back to work on the Pacific.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: J.L. on August 14, 2018, 10:35:49 PM
Hi Dave, I have not been following this thread. My loss.

Your attention to detail is astounding - handmade pintles and gudgeons on the hinges and hasp; customized stencilling.

You are at the top of your game.

Best regards,

John


 
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on August 15, 2018, 12:25:26 AM
Thank you for the very nice comments John, they are much appreciated; I learned some new words too.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 22, 2018, 11:40:32 PM
Hi Guys

I had some time today to make a video of the Pacific actually running. It's not the best quality, as I was using my digital camera, maybe there is a better way.
Anyway here it is.

I4mfFIq-e7w
Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Ye-Ole Steam Dude on September 22, 2018, 11:49:09 PM
Hello Dave,

Beautiful engine and a very nice video. :ThumbsUp:

Have a great day,
Thomas
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: crueby on September 22, 2018, 11:52:52 PM
That's simply stunning Dave!


 :NotWorthy:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Don1966 on September 23, 2018, 12:40:43 AM
Dave that is just stunning buddy an awesome built and she runs a treat. Did I say .......I.........like..... :Love:


 :drinking-41:
Don
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on September 23, 2018, 12:41:00 AM
Awesome Dave. Absolute beauty. Great sound and great video.   :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 23, 2018, 01:38:33 AM
Dave, stunning work! That pump sure pumps a lot of water.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 10KPete on September 23, 2018, 01:40:33 AM
Wow, wow, wow! Can't even tell the flywheel is turning by looking at the rim...so smooth. Just beautiful, Dave!
 :NotWorthy: :praise2: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Pete
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on September 23, 2018, 02:08:39 AM
I've been waiting for that video for 5 years.  Thanks for the ride.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on September 23, 2018, 02:25:54 AM
Dave,
That ran & sounded GREAT! Here I thought I'd missed you running it and realized the video was from today. I've spent the day in the garage trying to make room for 2 cars. I have an 1988 xr4ti, the plan is for it to come home soon.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: 90LX_Notch on September 23, 2018, 02:36:01 AM
Dave-

It is simply stunning.  It is very hypnotic watching it run.   Absolutely gorgeous work and execution.

-Bob
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: tvoght on September 23, 2018, 03:35:31 AM
Echoing your thums up, Dave. The wow factor is high on this one.--Tim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on September 23, 2018, 05:07:36 AM
Hi Dave, a beauty and running so smooth. A real masterpiece.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on September 23, 2018, 06:24:44 AM
Wow, Dave!  That's just amazing!  I love that little cam follower thingy that does the every other cycle bit.  I remember you giving me a demo of that 4-5 years back at GEARS.  and now, seeing it in action is quite cool.
Thanks for sharing the video.
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on September 23, 2018, 07:35:39 AM
It's been a long time coming but certainly worth the wait. Runs really nice and smoothly and at a very pleasing speed. Pump is certainly working well too even if the water has turn a bit rusty coloured!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jo on September 23, 2018, 07:44:58 AM
8)

Looks like you deserve a new set of model engine castings Dave  :ThumbsUp:

Jo
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: sco on September 23, 2018, 11:10:51 AM
That is exquisite - beautiful work and lovely smooth runner!

Simon.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Alyn Foundry on September 23, 2018, 11:22:46 AM
Another " awakening " superb craftsmanship. It's a credit to you!

Cheers Graham.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on September 23, 2018, 10:44:18 PM
Absolutely stunning work Dave. This build log I give credit to for a lot of the way I try to do things today. Your attention to detail, the care of your machines, the quality of your parts, and of course, swarfless machining  8), has been quite an inspiration. Canít wait for the next ďmulti-yearĒ build, this one has certainly been worth it. Just awesome

Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 24, 2018, 12:51:00 AM
Thank you everyone for all the very generous comments, they do mean a lot to me.
It is nice that everyone has continued to follow this years long build. I'm not finished quite yet, now it is time to tear it down for the wood work on the base and painting. I know some will say no leave it bare, but I made up my mind (right or wrong) that the engine and pump will be painted, as they would have been when they left the factory.

I'm pretty happy how the engine runs except that it loves to eight stroke, I was hoping that the pump would supply enough load that the engine would settle down to a regular four stroke cycle. I can load it down by pinching the flywheel and fiddle with the mixture and get it to four stroke, but with the gear reduction the engine doesn't know the pump is even there. With some care adjusting the mixture and throttle I can get it down to 250 to 300 rpm, she likes to run in that range and is pleasing to watch. Any slower and it will just cost to a stop, the mixture is super critical running on propane. Maybe with the proper vapor carburetor I will be able get it running slower.

Maury, it does pump really well; I thought that I may have to restrict the output to force some of the water up through the engine, not the case. Even with the output wide open I need to throttle the cooling water output from the engine to get it to heat up.

Jason, The pink water is from some automotive coolant that I added to the water. One of the pieces of literature that I have indicated that this was a wine pumping outfit, and there are some testimonials from some vineyards on how well they liked their engines. Maybe I should just die my cooling water purple?

I'm looking forward to getting the project finished but there is still much to do.

Thanks again everyone, for all your very nice comments.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 24, 2018, 01:17:20 AM
Absolutely stunning work Dave. This build log I give credit to for a lot of the way I try to do things today. Your attention to detail, the care of your machines, the quality of your parts, and of course, swarfless machining  8), has been quite an inspiration. Canít wait for the next ďmulti-yearĒ build, this one has certainly been worth it. Just awesome

Eric

Eric, I forgot to mention you in my previous post, I'm glad that I have given you some inspiration and maybe even a little help a little on your ME projects; at least you will have nice nuts!  :lolb:
Seriously I just do my thing and if our ME community is able to benefit somewhat from it, that is just icing on the cake. You have a way with words, I don't, so I will just leave it there.

Thanks buddy,
Dave



Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 24, 2018, 01:32:37 AM
Dave, if you want to put a bit more load on the engine, throttle the water a bit more. The pump was made to pump at fairly high pressure.

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Craig DeShong on September 24, 2018, 01:57:52 AM
Exquisite Dave, Love the sound !!!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 24, 2018, 07:32:53 PM
Thanks Craig, I appreciate the nice comment.

Maury I may give that a try, but increasing the pressure at the pump would increase the load on all the related components; so in the long run I'm not sure that it is worth it.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Johnmcc69 on September 24, 2018, 09:07:41 PM
 :ThumbsUp:
 Just beautiful work Dave!
 A fine runner & I think it will be pretty nice all painted up.

 John
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: maury on September 24, 2018, 10:55:44 PM
Dave, one other question. I know you are painting the engine, but I'm wondering how you kept the rust off of it all this time?

maury
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on September 24, 2018, 11:24:50 PM
Itís Dave: no swarf, no rust  :lolb:

Whiskey
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 24, 2018, 11:54:45 PM
The high desert of southwestern Idaho where the humidity is rarely over 25%.  :lolb:
The heated and air conditioned shop also helps.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: b.lindsey on September 25, 2018, 12:38:49 AM
I missed a few posts and the video Dave. Just amazing in form and function. Sorry to be late to the party.

Bill
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 25, 2018, 01:58:01 AM
:ThumbsUp:
 Just beautiful work Dave!
 A fine runner & I think it will be pretty nice all painted up.

 John

Thank you,
John
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 25, 2018, 02:00:49 AM
I missed a few posts and the video Dave. Just amazing in form and function. Sorry to be late to the party.

Bill

Thanks Bill, much appreciated.

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kuhncw on September 25, 2018, 02:33:58 AM
Beautiful piece of work, Dave!

Chuck
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on September 25, 2018, 04:13:38 PM
Hi Dave,
 Stunning piece of work. Art in motion!

Likes been said whatís next? What ever you decide Iíll be along for the ride

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Chipmaster on September 25, 2018, 05:45:14 PM
Terrific engine and a nice video that gives us the opportunity to enjoy the action. :ThumbsUp:

Andy
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on September 25, 2018, 07:54:21 PM
I guess I might have missed it or forgot ( consequences of the 70ís :lolb:) but, what is the next build from the ďland of swarfless machining and no rustĒ ? 8) :stickpoke:

Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on September 26, 2018, 12:54:12 AM
Chuck, Kerrin, and Andy, thanks guys I appreciate the nice comments.

Eric, let me say that there is a new IC engine project in the works, no, I haven't started on it, and yes it will most definitely be a multi year build. I'm looking forward to getting going on it, but there is much to do first; including slopping some paint on the Pacific and pump.  :lolb:

Stay tuned,
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on September 26, 2018, 02:34:26 AM
We need a Merlin build here.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 14, 2018, 11:20:22 PM
Hi guys
When I first built the drive gear assembly for the pump there were quite a few comments about how the gear covered up the nice lettering on the base of the engine. I really wanted to stay true to that advertisement that I had used to model the pump assembly.

Well after looking at it for a while now and watching it run I have decided to go ahead a put some spokes in the cast iron bull gear. I feel that it will give the engine more visual interest both running and static. Being able to see the Pacific logo will also be a plus.

Some of the early California engine builders used webs between the flywheel spokes for counter weights. Mery is one that comes to mind. I decided that the web approach would be a good way to create the boss where the drive pin will be located.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/120_tooth_gear_new.jpg)
The gear was modeled in Alibre to see how it would look. I printed one at work so I could put it on the engine and think about it for a while. I kind of liked it.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_001.jpg)
Starting out a pair of soft jaws were machined to hold the gear.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_002.jpg)
Then the gear was indicated in.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_003.jpg)
The first side of the gear is machined. I used a .03 radius carbide bull mill for all operations. This way I could use this cutter to surface the radius in and not have to change tools. A, (Z Level finish) tool path was used with a .005Ē step down. Iím a long time user of BobCAD and really liking the current version #31, I believe it is their best yet.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_004.jpg)
The gear was flipped over indicated in, and machined.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_005.jpg)
Here it is fresh from the mill to see how it is going to look.

(http://listerengine.com/coppermine/albums/userpics/10012/Gear_Mod_007.jpg)
After a little bench work to remove the tool marks and a light bead blast. Iím quite pleased with how it looks on the engine.
One other concern I had was how to keep that large machined solid gear looking nice, now it can be painted with just the outer rim left bare.


Thanks for checking in.
Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Art K on December 14, 2018, 11:37:51 PM
Dave,
The job on the gear is great. Looks good on the engine as well. I have to admit not owning any bull endmill. Standard and a few radius emill's.
Art
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: cnr6400 on December 14, 2018, 11:47:09 PM
That last photo is great Dave, and fine work on the gear and other engine and pump parts. Staying tuned here!  :popcorn:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: kvom on December 14, 2018, 11:59:43 PM
I see a few chips in a couple of the photos.  Dave's work is slipping.   :stir:

Gear is great anyway.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Steamer5 on December 15, 2018, 12:10:43 AM
Hi Dave,
 Just been back to check the before shot!
This steps it up yet another level! Very very nice.

Cheers Kerrin
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on December 15, 2018, 04:32:18 AM
Hi Dave, very impressive. Ist there any picture of the operation itself available, with the cutter ?
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Kim on December 15, 2018, 06:44:47 AM
Wow Dave! That looks amazing!  Very slick indeed.
So, I'm not familiar with the term Bull Mill.  What's different about a bull mill compared to a regular end mill?
Kim
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Jasonb on December 15, 2018, 07:11:44 AM
Sounds like what we call a radius end mill, just the corners of the tips have a convex radiused, I have freehand ground them from blunt standard cutters when wanting an internal fillet as they remove metal far faster than a round nose (which we call bull nose) cutter.

Wheel looks good Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: yogi on December 15, 2018, 02:14:35 PM
Beautiful gear Dave!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
It adds even more character to an already impressive masterpiece!  :popcorn:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Tennessee Whiskey on December 15, 2018, 04:01:17 PM
Beauty on top of beauty  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: 

Eric
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Ye-Ole Steam Dude on December 15, 2018, 04:01:29 PM
Hello Dave,

OK, that gear is way too pretty to cover up any part of it with paint, how about anodize it?  :praise2:

Have a great day,
Thomas
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: zeeprogrammer on December 15, 2018, 05:52:24 PM
Your finishes are always astounding.
I'd like to know more about your bead blasting system and other tips/techniques for getting those awesome finishes.

P.S. Chips on the table? tsk tsk
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on December 16, 2018, 05:10:48 PM
Thanks for all the very nice comments guys.

Yesterday was a busy day for us, my daughter graduated from BSU with her degree in Mechanical Engineering, her mom and I are very proud of her. She already has a great job at a local robotic and industrial automation company where she has worked for the last couple of years first as a summer intern and then an engineer in training. https://thehouseofdesign.com/

As Jason has indicated a bull end is just a different name for a flat end mill with radiused corners. Lots of times it is nice to have both the flat cutting ability and the radius combined in one tool. They are very nice for 3d surfacing in some applications.

Achim, I didnít take any pictures of the cutting operation but I have attached a picture of the tool path used to radius the spokes. Because of the radius on the tool the steps are blended and only take a quick rub with some sanding cloth to remove the tool marks.

Zee, I have also attached a picture of my little blast cabinet. Itís nothing very fancy, I built it many years ago. The upper box with the arm holes I purchased at an employee auction. It was a small self contained bench top unit for doing very fine cleaning of vacuum system components; all I got was the sheet metal box. I fabricated stand and lower hopper and assembled what you see here. A small gun was purchased and I had scrounged a foot pedal air valve. The fancy stainless steel cyclone separator was added later down the road. It came off a piece of high tech equipment that a friend was scrapping out.

But what matters is the media, I use very fine glass bead (https://www.mcmaster.com/3337k59) to obtain that nice satin look. The prep work is done with fine files, sanding sticks and sanding cloth rolls.

Thanks again guys, I will try to do a better job of the swarf-less machining that I seem to be known for. :Lol:

Dave
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: fumopuc on December 16, 2018, 06:25:46 PM
Hi Dave, thanks for the toolpath picture, it makes it easier for me to understand.
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Craig DeShong on December 19, 2018, 12:57:37 AM
That last photo is great Dave, and fine work on the gear and other engine and pump parts. Staying tuned here!  :popcorn:

Ditto here also Dave.  Great work !!
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: gary.a.ayres on October 07, 2019, 11:52:58 PM
Way above my level but that doesn't stop me from appreciating it.

Great looking engine + beautiful photos.

 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
Title: Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
Post by: Dave Otto on October 08, 2019, 12:38:58 AM
Thank you Gary, and Craig who I missed last December.

The poor thing has been neglected for far too long.
I have been doing some workshop improvements lately among other things, but I'm hoping to be able to get back to work on it and finish it this winter.
We'll  see how that works out for me.

Dave