Author Topic: 1953 Ford standard transmission  (Read 2133 times)

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2020, 08:48:05 PM »
Hi George

Iíve built my version of Chuck Fellowsís helical gear cutting fixture and have used it on several projects now.  Making custom gear cutters is way beyond my skill set yet.  Iíve just been purchasing involuted cutters when needed, but the cost, as you know, can get high.  Granger tools in the best supplier (here un the US Iíve found) for purchasing involuted cutters.

I sure wish I lived near and could stop by and get a crash course on how you make the involute cutters; itís a skill Iíd like to add to my Ďtool boxí.

This is going to be a fastenating project; Iíll surely be following along.

Craig

Offline Don1966

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2020, 02:12:04 AM »
Craig I made a spreadsheet to help make cutters and Hobbs to cut gears with and all the diffent gear calculations. If you want it PM me with your email address and I will gladly send it to you. I tried to post it in plans and drawing but itís to large a file. If you havenít got the book ( gears and gear cutting by Ivan law get it. Amazon has it for about $10. Itís money well spent.

Regards Don

Offline Zephyrin

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2020, 09:14:18 AM »
I'm always impressed by the care with which you describe your machining methods, it's hard to find more useful than these posts...

I too was blown away by the ingenuity of the Chuck Fellows device for cutting helical gears, and of course I too embarked on making my own version of this device, which allowed me to make the helical gears of a mini 4T engine, my last one. I'm very proud of these gears even if they are hidden inside!

I have acquired new expertise thanks to these gentlemen, for which I am very grateful.



Offline mikemill

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2020, 09:46:31 AM »
For those interested in gear cutting this book is by a well respected engineer.
https://www.teepublishing.co.uk/books/gears/gears-and-gear-cutting/
I have used it for many years good referance.

Mike

Online Jo

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2020, 10:21:57 AM »
Yes that is the book Don was referring to   :)

Jo
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Offline gbritnell

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2020, 01:51:21 PM »
 I started on the gear case. It began with a block of aluminum. I squared it up to the required dimensions then added all the tapped holes, front, side and rear. The full sized box is a casting so therefore is enclosed on all sides, other than the access window and holes. To make this one I designed it so I could do all the internal machining from the front end and then make a cover plate that would match the contours. The case was rough drilled then bored to the proper size. The gear box has a tapered relief hole offset from the main centerline (countershaft gear clearance). It would need to be stepped into the block so there was 2 ways I could do it. One was to mount it on my rotary table and using a ball mill step the shape into the box. The other which I deemed a lot less work was to just use the boring bar and make steps similar to using the rotary table but wouldn't necessitate tearing down the vise and setting up the rotary table. I calculated the steps and started removing metal. When you're doing a job have you ever had the feeling that it sounds like your cutting more than you should be. Well that was the case with this operation. The first cuts were made with my larger boring bar but I needed to switch to a smaller one to finish the smaller tapered radius deep in the box. I made my setups the same but only subtracted the radius instead of the diameter dimension when adjusting the boring head. (head reads in diameter) I made a couple of cuts and it sounded like too much material was being cut and sure enough it was. After realizing my mistake I reset the boring head and finished the cuts. I ended up with a small circular notch in the taper which won't affect anything as the metal wall is thick enough to accommodate it but  it was one of those crap moments. I already had 4 hours in the part so I filled it with JB weld for no other reason than to make the tapered hole smooth.
 Next up is the front cover plate. I started with a piece of aluminum that was about 3/8" larger per side than the finished piece. This would allow me to clamp it for the needed machining. I started in the vise and put the holes in then transferred it to the rotary table. The back side has a raised boss that has the same shape as the window opening in the front of the gear box. I cut the radii and sides right to the calculated size then stepped the cutter down leaving about .008 from breaking through. I cut the perimeter shape then removed the piece and sawed the framing from the part. Even though the radii and sides were cut to the calculated dimensions (radius of part plus radius of end mill) they came out a bit large so some filing was necessary to get a good fit. As seen in the picture the front face has some countersunk holes. These will be to secure the cover to the gear box. When it's finished I will remove the temporary screws and make up aluminum countersunk screws. I thread the screws and turn the head diameter a little larger than the diameter of the countersink. Leaving the screw on the bar stock I then tighten it in the hole and cut it off leaving a small protrusion. This gets milled and filed flush so it will end up that the screws will be almost invisible and make like the gear box is a complete enclosure.
 The last piece for the day is the countershaft. All of the gear were made .250 wide but needed to be adjusted to the required dimensions so I made split bushing to hold them in the lathe and faced them to size. While running true in the split bushing I also opened up the center hole to the needed size. Two piece were needed to join the gears and make it look like one shaft. The pieces were turned with a shouldered diameter on both ends. I then used a tool with a radiused end to form the fillets up to the shoulders. The pieces were a light press fit into the gear and also had a coating of high strength Loctite applied.
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Offline gbritnell

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2020, 01:55:35 PM »
If someone notices that the small gear on the end of the shaft has the teeth going the other way that because that's the reverse gear. It drives the idler gear which needs to mesh with the first/reverse slider gear on the mainshaft. So it's left, right, left. The outside diameter of this gear is just slightly smaller than the root diameter of the gear ahead of it. The first/reverse slider gear meshes with the second gear from the right (low gear) then it slides on splines to the rear where it will mesh with the reverse idler gear.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 02:02:20 PM by gbritnell »
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline bernienufc

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2020, 02:10:38 PM »
Threads like this one are a goldmine, long live the forums. I know George has answered some of my questions via email in the past but how can you not love reading these threads again and again, i just wish i could have spent my youth in better ways when i see what is capable with the skills shown here.
Following with avid interest :-)
Bernie

Offline nj111

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2020, 08:32:11 PM »
Great progress, especially love that little cluster of helical gears.  You made a minor machining error so you are human after all!  Myself, I  have to make 2 or 3 of everything to get one item correct!
Nick

Offline gbritnell

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2020, 03:17:43 PM »
I have all the gears, splines, shafts and collars finished and installed in the gear box. I had to make two cutters up to cut the splines on the input shaft and the output shaft. The spline (male) were cut from a length of spline shaft I had purchased when I was building the Borg-Warner T-5 transmission. I purchased a piece of spline bushing to match and cut 2 pieces from it, one that was pressed into the low gear gear and the other for the 2-3 shift collar. It took a little modifying and hand work to get the reverse idler gear meshing properly with it's mate on the countershaft.
First picture the input spline shaft.
Second picture looking into the gear box toward the front end with the countershaft and the input gear with spline.
Remaining pictures are a box full of gears and a couple of overall shots.
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline Don1966

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2020, 03:47:46 PM »
That is awesome George love the gears and all the work that goes into them.... :Love:




 :cheers:
Don

Offline Roger B

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2020, 08:04:56 PM »
Excellent  :praise2:  :praise2: Can you put a ruler or similar in a shot to give me an idea of the size of the gearbox?
Best regards

Roger

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2020, 08:52:38 PM »
Excellent  :praise2:  :praise2: Can you put a ruler or similar in a shot to give me an idea of the size of the gearbox?

I was about to ask too Roger, but you beat me too it.  Fantastic work as usual George. :cheers:

Craig

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2020, 09:22:51 PM »
Fantastic work George  :praise2:

As I never saw one of these before, I have to ask if I got the function right ....
I know that the shift forks are not installed yet - am I right in guessing that the pictures show the box in neutral ?
If we move the left fork all the way left it's in top and the power goes straight through (1:1) ?
Move the left fork as far right as it should go and we are in second gear ?
Move the left fork back to it's middle position, and if we instead moved the right fork as far left as it should go, the box is in Low or first ?
Finally move the right fork all the way right and it's in reverse ?

Or have I got it completely wrong ?

Best wishes

Per

Offline gbritnell

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Re: 1953 Ford standard transmission
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2020, 09:41:49 PM »
Hi Per,
You are 100% correct.
Talent unshared is talent wasted.