Author Topic: Stephenson's Rocket  (Read 14488 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2020, 02:38:48 AM »
Just don't get the plan sheets mixed up and stick a spark plug in!   :Jester:

Offline sbwhart

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2020, 07:02:59 AM »
Hi Bryan

I'v actually seen the original rocket when it was on display at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, can't remember if I took any pictures, I'll have a look in my files  just in case I did. One thing I did notice was that both valves were controlled by one eccentric the right had valve was direct off the eccentric with the left operated from same eccentric via lay shaft and levers.

Having read a few book about George and Robert Stevenson I know that Rocket went through many changes and rebuilds even after the Rainhill trials as they were striving to develop and perfect the locomotives many of the lessons they learnt they incorporated in there later locomotives.

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the way

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2020, 07:51:45 AM »
Julius' drawings are for a display model so unlikely to be fully details. You can buy a set of plans from Sarik here in the UK for a working model.

The photos here show the valve rods and linkages quite well and you can see the eccentrics on one of the front views

https://www.stationroadsteam.com/maxwell-hemmens-3-12-inch-gauge-rocket-stock-code-3815/

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2020, 02:31:28 PM »
Hi Brian,

I am sure you know about the Rocket model offered by Occre Models in Spain. It is probably far less sophisticated than the level of engineering you are discussing here. But it has an attractive appearance.

Quoting Occre advertising:

"In 1829 the Liverpool and Manchester Railway held the Rainhill Trials to find the best locomotive for their line.

The winner, from a field of five entries, was George Stephenson and his Rocket. This locomotive, which only weighed 4.2 tons, had a multi-tubular boiler, almost 6 ft long with a diameter of 3 ft 4 in, that was of great efficiency in terms of heat transfer. The pistons, in the cylinders, which were set at an inclined position, were coupled up to 4 ft 8 in diameter drive wheels, and she was capable of reaching speeds of up to 25 mph."


Cheers...John


Online Brian Rupnow

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2020, 02:36:42 PM »
Thank you Jason for the link. Those pictures do show a lot of detail.  Hi Stu, nice to hear from you. John, I've read about the Rainhill trials. wish I could have been there.---Brian

Online Brian Rupnow

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2020, 05:15:18 PM »
This mornings work consisted of modeling the engine base. It doesn't look like a lot, but all of the math data is embedded in the solid models. This afternoon I will recreate the cylinder and valve body and fit it to the engine frame.

Offline rklopp

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2020, 09:41:15 PM »
There is a great book, M.R. Bailey and J.P. Glithero, The Engineering and History of Rocket published by the [UK] National Railway Museum in 2000. It is an academic-level investigation with hundreds of references and exquisite drawings.

Online Brian Rupnow

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2020, 09:52:56 PM »
Thank you Rklopp---That clears up a lot of the mystery.---Brian

Online Brian Rupnow

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2020, 11:52:37 PM »
And as the day wears on, the components are beginning to get much simpler. More related to machining and silver soldering than a complex bunch of platework tig welded together.

Online crueby

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2020, 01:06:41 AM »
There is a great book, M.R. Bailey and J.P. Glithero, The Engineering and History of Rocket published by the [UK] National Railway Museum in 2000. It is an academic-level investigation with hundreds of references and exquisite drawings.
And another book to order for my library! Looks like a good one.

Offline derekwarner

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2020, 01:59:29 AM »
Hi Brian.......looking impressive, just one question........

I understand the Drawings depict the Z reinforcement beam in the base, however find it conflicts with tradition in design

We have a 3 1/2" gauge functional scale coal-fired model of the Rocket here in OZ.......masses of polished brass...it is an absolute gem

Derek  :cheers:
« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 02:03:19 AM by derekwarner »
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2020, 07:37:24 AM »

I understand the Drawings depict the Z reinforcement beam in the base, however find it conflicts with tradition in design

If Brian is going to be making a rocket then I expect that it will simply become a horizontal member when fixed to the side of the chassis once the cylinder and cross head guide assembly is mounted at an angle, a handed pair will be needed.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 08:40:49 AM by Jasonb »

Online sco

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2020, 10:52:41 AM »
This might be useful: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/52773

Towards the bottom of the page is a fully rotatable and zoomable model of the Rocket generated from LIDAR scans.

Simon.
Ars longa, vita brevis.

Online crueby

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2020, 12:56:30 PM »
This might be useful: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/52773

Towards the bottom of the page is a fully rotatable and zoomable model of the Rocket generated from LIDAR scans.

Simon.
That is an amazing scan/model!

Offline tangler

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Re: Stephenson's Rocket
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2020, 01:30:57 PM »
There is a Haynes Owners' Workshop Manual for Stephenson's Rocket.  It's  a bit of a coffee table book but does include quite a few detail drawings from the Glithero book

[https://www.amazon.ca/Stephensons-Rocket-Manual-1829-onwards/dp/1785210637/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=stephenson+rocket&qid=1588940780&s=books&sr=1-3]

Stay well,
Rod