Author Topic: A Simple Uniflow Engine  (Read 7144 times)

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11143
  • Rochester NY
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #165 on: October 14, 2020, 11:13:34 PM »
A few years ago I tried a few different blueing compounds on a variety of steels, worked good on some alloys, not on others. Tough to predict.

Offline gary.a.ayres

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 862
  • British Isles & sometimes France
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #166 on: October 14, 2020, 11:21:22 PM »
What kind of alloys Chris?

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11143
  • Rochester NY
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #167 on: October 14, 2020, 11:25:46 PM »
What kind of alloys Chris?
Tried it on cold rolled, drill rod, couple stainless, forget the details. Its back on a thread. Somewhere. Bottom line, needs experimenting like you did, as I recall there was no predictable results.

Offline gary.a.ayres

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 862
  • British Isles & sometimes France
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #168 on: October 14, 2020, 11:29:45 PM »
Ah ok.

I found that the silver steel responded better than the cast iron did. Very dark, even colour with almost zero effort.

Certainly warrants further exploration in due course though.

Online Kim

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4159
  • Portland, Oregon, USA
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #169 on: October 15, 2020, 05:52:57 AM »
There are various chemical blackening agents designed for brass also.  I've used them on other projects.  They also have varying results.  I found that I got the most consistent results by doing a thorough fairly careful process (a good cleaning of washing, then rinsing in acetone, allowing them to dry thoroughly (without touching), then submerged in thinned brass black for a specific amount of time, followed quickly by a gentle water rinse and allowed to dry).  With that process I got pretty consistent results on the brass.  I tried three different types of brass black to see what I liked.  Don't remember exactly what I ended up using, but if you're ever interested I could look it up.

Anyway, you're not trying to blacken brass, but since you tried your stuff on brass and found it didn't work, I wanted to let you know that they are available!

Kim

Offline gary.a.ayres

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 862
  • British Isles & sometimes France
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #170 on: October 15, 2020, 11:03:00 PM »
Hi Kim -

Thank you for this. I probably won't be looking to blacken brass in this build, but it's always a possibility in future projects. Now that I know that it exists, it might get my mind ticking over. I'll come back to you for advice on which one was best if and when I decide to try it.

All good info, for me and perhaps others looking in too!

I'd be very interested to know if there are any compounds out there that will impart colours other than black to metals (other than plating or anodising I mean).

I'd love to get into anodising aluminium, but I don't have room for the gear. Mind you, lack of space has never stopped me before...

Offline gary.a.ayres

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 862
  • British Isles & sometimes France
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #171 on: October 18, 2020, 11:19:20 PM »
Made a start on the base today. The two big pieces of oak were joined together using jointing biscuits and exterior grade wood glue:



I love the smell of oak when it's being worked.



In the following photo the glue hadn't yet been applied - this was a trial fit to make sure the biscuits lined up:



It has now been glued up and laid somewhere flat indoors. I'll release the clamps tomorrow. The pieces of oak are the shape they are because they were initially intended for another project, for which they were mitred. The pointed ends will either be cut square or shaped in due course, though it may be useful to keep a bit of extra length so that accessories can be mounted on them.

I then began marking out the blanks for the sides of the engine frame on a piece of 5mm thick aluminium plate:



The sides will be made from the narrow rectangle at each end of the sheet of plate. The sheet is very precisely cut as purchased, so the existing edges will be good as reference lines for machining. A lot of the machining will be on the two sides at the same time, bolted together.

There will be more than enough plate left in that middle section to make a piece which will be fixed flat to the oak base under the engine, like a floor.

It was late afternoon by this time so I decided to leave setting up the saw to cut the plate for another day. This evening, I did a thorough clean-up of the mill to get all the cast iron swarf off it. Pleased to say it scrubbed up nicely. The lathe will be getting the same treatment, probably tomorrow.


Offline MJM460

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1206
  • Melbourne, Australia
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #172 on: October 19, 2020, 12:20:51 AM »
Wow, Gary, that ought to be enough biscuits! 

A pity. That so much of the oak will be hidden, but it should definitely be heavy enough to hold the engine down.

Good to see the progress.

MJM460

The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!

Offline gary.a.ayres

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 862
  • British Isles & sometimes France
Re: A Simple Uniflow Engine
« Reply #173 on: October 19, 2020, 09:30:30 AM »
Ha, yes... as I have previously admitted I do tend to somewhat over-engineer things. That said, these are big heavy pieces of wood, so better safe than sorry.

Agree that it's a shame to cover so much of the wood, but I'd rather any oil and water fall on to a metal surface. Also, the wooden base will be quite a bit wider than the frame so there will still be a fair amount of oak visible.