Author Topic: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine  (Read 5837 times)

Online cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #165 on: January 16, 2020, 05:43:12 PM »
I've bought continuous cast iron bar under Durabar trademark too.  Grey iron branded stuff may not be the same as Durabar or Meehanite. One thing to look for when you have the bar in your hand is that continuous cast bar will have visible bands like the bands on a palm tree trunk on the outside, and no parting lines along the bar.  Grey iron stick won't have the rings and may have parting lines along the bar.

Re the elves's dog colour change - must have been a small dog or a really big iron cutting job.  :Lol:

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #166 on: January 16, 2020, 05:54:26 PM »
Okay--Just talked to my supplier and the grey cast iron I buy is "class 40". I don't see any particular "banding" on the short pieces I have.---Just a fairly uniform grey color.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #167 on: January 16, 2020, 06:00:21 PM »
Great - thanks guys for your time!! A chunk is cheap enough, I'll get some and experiment with it.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #168 on: January 16, 2020, 07:54:43 PM »
With the cylinder caps done, next up is to bore the holes for the piston valve sleeves (after will start cutting the passages). Took the holding fixture off the faceplate and clamped it in the mill vise, and drilled a starter hole for the first valve. I left the bottom end caps on to keep the chips out of the threads.


followed by boring it out to 0.392", and .422" at the top to hold the shoulder on the sleeve.

Followed by, you guessed it, drilling the second starter hole:

Good place to stop for the afternoon...

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #169 on: January 16, 2020, 08:17:25 PM »
There is a complex equation that covers this, but when taken down to a point where the average machinist can understand it says "The  more complex the part being machined is, the tighter your butt cheeks are clenched with every further machining operation." :pinkelephant: :pinkelephant:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #170 on: January 16, 2020, 08:29:41 PM »
There is a complex equation that covers this, but when taken down to a point where the average machinist can understand it says "The  more complex the part being machined is, the tighter your butt cheeks are clenched with every further machining operation." :pinkelephant: :pinkelephant:
True!

Online cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #171 on: January 16, 2020, 09:41:03 PM »
Was that section of math called puckerometry?  :Lol:

These days you might be able to find wearable sensors to read that sort of pressure directly. Not that you'd want to, but for work at the stage you are at I'd suggest the type calibrated up to 10,000 psi.  :lolb:


Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #172 on: January 17, 2020, 06:09:47 PM »
This morning got the other valve hole bored like the first, the rest of the operations are a lot more straightforward with less pucker factor!

Started in on the other holes/ports/passages, starting with the top end plug hole. I assume this one is there for maintenance and cleaning out casting cores, it will be plugged for normal operation.

Then drilled/tapped the steam inlet hole in the side, then the smaller mounting holes around it. I need to look up what these other 4 were used for, if they held the inlet pipe flange, or were for mounting other case parts, maybe more passage cleanout plugs.

Now that those holes are located/drilled/tapped, I can go back and do more carving on the bosses around them to round them better.

Also started laying out the slots to be milled in to form the steam passages to/from the cylinders. The pairs of slots go through to the ports in the valve sleeves, and will be connected with holes drilled from the cylinder ends. The exhaust goes out the centered slotsat the ends.




Online cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #173 on: January 17, 2020, 06:12:15 PM »
 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Online Vixen

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #174 on: January 17, 2020, 06:19:50 PM »
Hi Chris,

On first sight that cylinder block looks just like the core of a Weber DCOE 40 carburetors as fitted to many sports and race cars.



Your Stanley735 engine block is a remarkable feat of model engineering, more so when you consider the machinary used to create it.   :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Mike
« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 06:39:22 PM by Vixen »
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #175 on: January 17, 2020, 07:32:14 PM »
Hi Mike,  I have noticed that it also looks like a small pair of binoculars. If the engine doesn't work, guess it can be repurposed!


 :cheers:

Online cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #176 on: January 17, 2020, 08:53:16 PM »
Hi Chris, I recall also that your shop elves were eyeing the 3D printed cylinder as the potential basis for an elf launcher system.........many purposes for it , it seems.  :atcomputer:  :Lol:

 :cheers: to Mike for reminding me of many days spent in my youth trying to get engines to run properly with Weber and SU carbs. When it was a nice sunny day in summer, not so bad. At -25 deg C in fog or snow here in Ontario Canada, not so much...... wise to have bus tickets or good boots if you had a car with Weber or SU here in that sort of weather!

A lot of makeshift inlet manifolds were made of exhaust tubing, plumbing parts new and used (and more than one musical instrument) to adapt US made Carter or Holley or Rochester carbs off Chevs and Fords, perfectly suitable for very cold weather to very hot,  to cars using Webers and SU's to enable more reliable very cold weather ops.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #177 on: January 17, 2020, 09:08:53 PM »
Ah, yes - Rochester Products car parts - used to be a couple of factories here in Rochester, got to take tours before they got shut down, and the buildings eventually burned down.   :(   The floors in some areas were wood block, like butcher block, and were absolutely soaked with oil over the years. Fascinating places to see back then.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #178 on: January 17, 2020, 09:21:10 PM »
Colder than a shop gnomes heart out there today, so good time to stay in and work in the shop. Got some more done on filing/sanding/sandblasting the outside of the cylinder block to smooth things out some more, then got started on the cover plate and port slots. Laid out and tap-size drilled the cover plate,

then used that as a drill guide on the cylinder block,

and then drilled the cover plate out to the clearance size for the screws.

Next is to drill/mill in the exhaust ports. These slots go through the cover plate and down into the cavities past the ends of where the valve sleeve will be. This connects the ends of the valve bores to collect the steam and run them out the manifold (to be made later). So, with the cover plate bolted down, drilled the slot locations first, through into the valve bores:

and used a 1/8" end mill to connect the holes.

Removed the cover plate so I could deepen the slots a bit more. These slots will take the exhaust steam after it comes out the ends of the valve sleeve when the valve piston is at the other end.

Next will be to mill the four slots in the cylinder block marked in blue in the last picture, which will connect the ports on the valve sleeves to the ends of the cylinders with some angled holes from the cylinders.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Build of a Stanley 735 Engine
« Reply #179 on: January 17, 2020, 09:25:32 PM »
Took another look at the original plans - those four holes around the steam inlet port were at the ends of passages, so makes sense they would have cleanout plugs to get the casting sand out.