Author Topic: RMC Type-B Engine Build  (Read 2491 times)

Offline Alyn Foundry

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2019, 06:44:58 PM »
Yes Jason, I did receive your email.

It seems I may have something in common with Nick, particularly his grandad....

Taken in 1985 my Spec 401 Lister of 1911 ( foreground ) sporting a Canadian style water hopper, seeing two together here in the UK is a very rare occurrence. Its mate belonged to the Late Mike Stokes of Bridgend.

Happy days....

Offline RayW

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2019, 09:27:41 PM »
Hi Graham,
By coincidence the back cover of the February 2020 edition of Stationary  Engine  magazine  features photos of two ball hopper Listers, one a J type and the other an L type, both photographed at the Great Dorset Steam Fair this year.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2019, 05:29:50 PM by RayW »
Ray

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2019, 07:48:48 PM »
Hi Jason

Did you forget to pay PhotoSuckit or are there other reasons why you profile and the rest of the pictures from you are gone ....?....  :embarassed:

Really looking forward to the rest of the build of this very interesting engine  :ThumbsUp: + perhaps some extra explanation on some of the rather special running options on this engine (yes I have read the article) that isn't the most self evident.  :cheers:   :popcorn:

Per
« Last Edit: December 18, 2019, 07:51:57 PM by Admiral_dk »

Offline Jo

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2019, 07:51:31 PM »
Did you forget to pay PhotoSuckit or are there other reasons why you profile and the rest of the pictures from you are gone ....?....  :embarassed:

 :facepalm:
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2019, 07:03:28 AM »
Says they are working on the site, I only see two missing images rest are coming up OK here and on ME

Offline Jo

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2019, 07:09:42 AM »
Only your YouTube link working here :(

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2019, 07:14:02 AM »
As I said only a couple not showing, Profile was but is not now.

And posted by PB, at least the user knows whats going on unlike some free sites that when they go down nobody knows.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2019, 07:20:09 AM by Jasonb »

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2019, 05:07:45 PM »
Jo will be pleased to know that PB us back up and running which just means I can get through the construction posts faster and then posts the videos of the engine running  :LittleDevil:

Offline Jo

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2019, 05:25:07 PM »
I hope you get a refund for this month  :stir:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2019, 06:59:48 PM »
Taking  a break from the castings I thought I would do the conrod next, this was roughed out from a piece of 5/8" steel. To produce the shapely big end I drew it out in Alibre and used that to produce a series of co-ordinates at 0.020" spacing which were cut with an insert parting tool





The stepped cut was then blended with files until a pleasing shape was produced.



As the distance between big and little ends was less than the width of my vice jaws I used a couple of 15-30-60 blocks as packing to hold the rod for drilling and reaming the ends, I also supported the big end with a make shift jack from some clamping nuts and a stud to make sure it did not deflect.



A couple of bronze bearings were turned up and fixed with 648 Loctite and the drilling for the oiler in teh big end carried through the bearing.



The carb is a fairly simple turning job with a few decorative beads that was then transfered to a 5C collet block to drill the cross hole for the choke and one half way in at 90deg for the fuel line nipple. I must stop taking such close up shots as it make sthe surface look rough!



The choke is just a spindle with a hole for the control lever at the end and then milled away either side to form a butterfly, not much metal left so a jack was used again.



The completed carb which looks a lot better from this distance ;) it's just a press fit into the hole in the cylinder side.



J


Online Vixen

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #25 on: December 22, 2019, 08:16:43 PM »
Taking  a break from the castings I thought I would do the conrod next, this was roughed out from a piece of 5/8" steel. To produce the shapely big end I drew it out in Alibre and used that to produce a series of co-ordinates at 0.020" spacing which were cut with an insert parting tool
J

Jason, You have made a nice elegantly shaped conrod for your Mr Whippy engine.

When i am profiling a smooth curved surface, like your conrod ends, I prefer to use a round nosed (1.0mm radius) insert type MRMN 200 in place of the square ended MGMN 200 insert. Both fit the same parting tool holder. The radiused steps are neater and easier to blend with a file than those cut with the square ended insert.

Both the MRMN 200 and the MGMN 200 will cut sideways as well as plunge cut, provided you do not too ambitious with the depth of cut. I often use them as a normal (but very narrow) turning tool, you can get into very tight places with them.

MIke

Mike
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 08:31:25 PM by Vixen »
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2019, 08:38:02 PM »
The square steps are a bit easier to workout the coordinates for and I find less likely to be deflected sideways, different for you using the CNC. But the 2mm round tip does usually live in my holder rather than the square one, I use it a lot when making "castings" as it leaves a nice fillet in the internal corners, also good for small conrods etc. That is also what I used to do the 1/4 and half circle concave cuts on the collet end of the carb body and was also using it this weekend to do a steam engine cylinder. Also got a 1mm one for my Nikole holder for really small stuff but often a 0.4mm corner radius insert tip will do.

.

Online Vixen

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2019, 08:47:21 PM »
The square steps are a bit easier to workout the coordinates for ....................

J

Draw a offset line, 1.0 mm from the curved surface. You can then pick off the coordinates to that line in the same way as before. Just remember to add the 1.mm to your tool zero position.

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #28 on: December 26, 2019, 06:56:20 PM »
I was just able to fit the jaws of the 3-jaw chuck between the spokes and counter weight of the flywheel casting which ran reasonably true and this enabled me to work on both sides and the edge all at once. The curved finished surface extends around about 220 degrees around the rim before stepping in slightly to the rest of the cast surface. I started by just taking off enough from front, back and edge to get a cleaned up ring and then measured the width. Armed with this size I worked out co-ordinates and machined the rim in 20 thou steps before blending these together with graver, files and finally some Emery.



I also took a light cut to define where the machined surface meets the cast and later blended that in with the Dremel. Hub was also machined and hole drilled and finish bored to a firm push fit on the PGMS that I used for the shaft.

The flywheel was then clamped to the mill table to have the crankpin hole drilled and reamed as well as a slot milled for the governor bracket and a tapped hole to hole said bracket in place. You may also just be able to see the mark on the rim to indicae where the governor pin hole needs to be drilled which was marked with a carbide point held in the mill chuck.



This mark made it easier to line things up when it came to drill the pin hole which is also counter bored and threaded so the threaded pin can be turned to alter the governor spring pressure.



The governor weight is made by modifying a 3/8" diameter bronze ball by adding a hole and turning a small shoulder.



The shoulder is used to locate the ball in the governor bracket while it is soldered in place. In use when running as in hit and miss mode the ball and bracket are thrown out by the force of the rotating flywheel which causes it to move away from the isolated ignition contact so the engine will miss, as things slow back down the bracket will again come into contact with the isolated point and it will hit (fire). governed speed can be adjusted by screwing the long pin in and out which alters the spring tension. To run as a throttler the nut retaining the bracket is simply tightened so it can't move outwards.



J

Online crueby

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Re: RMC Type-B Engine Build
« Reply #29 on: December 26, 2019, 07:43:02 PM »
Beauty of a flywheel, well done!    :popcorn: