Author Topic: Old School Sawmill Edger  (Read 7929 times)

Offline mike mott

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #60 on: November 02, 2019, 04:24:49 PM »
Just catching up Brian, a very interesting project and is inspiring me to get on with the Deal sawing machine that I have intentions of making after the loco is finished.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline awake

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #61 on: November 02, 2019, 07:40:13 PM »
It's not brazing---it's silver solder. Those sprockets are sold as just the outer rim and teeth, but no hub. I make my own hubs "to suit" and silver solder them into place. You're right though, it certainly looks like brazing.--Brian

Ah, that makes sense. I had forgotten that you had to solder in a hub.
Andy

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #62 on: November 02, 2019, 08:49:42 PM »
Today we have something very slick!! The man running the edger has to look at each board he puts through the edger, and estimate how wide he can make the board, and still not leave any wain (bark) on the edges. For the side of the board closest to the fence, he can move the adjustable fence in or out. For the other side of the board, he must be able to move the other saw closer to or farther away from the stationary saw. I've just finished with the mechanism which moves the non-fixed saw, and it is so neat I figured it was worth a short video.

Online crueby

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #63 on: November 02, 2019, 09:06:06 PM »
Oh, that is excellent!


Wish I was more Southern, would have a 'it is slicker than ....' quote.  That is okay to quote here, at least...  Don!  Whiskey! One of you guys should have a good one for us!!

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #64 on: November 03, 2019, 05:51:46 AM »
Slicker than wet leaves on a tin roof.

Really neat project, Brian.

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #65 on: November 03, 2019, 05:58:40 PM »
I'm having a lazy day today. I used my broach to put a 1/16" keyway thru the hub of the moveable saw blade, and milled a keyseat in the saw shaft. I have to try and find some 1/16" keystock tomorrow. This is a tricky business, because although the key must be there to transfer torque from the shaft to the blade, it must still allow the sawblade and hub to move along the length of the shaft as shown in the previous post to let the edger-man set the distance between the moveable saw and the fixed saw to select the width of board he wants to "edge".

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #66 on: November 03, 2019, 08:17:16 PM »
Hello Brian,

Can you put a small radius on the top two edges of the Key Stock?

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #67 on: November 03, 2019, 08:19:44 PM »
Yes Thomas, I can. I have about six different sanding machines here, and I'm sure one of them could do it with little effort.

Offline Art K

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #68 on: November 04, 2019, 03:23:27 AM »
Brian,
Good to see more progress, the lever that moves the blade works quite well. You'll be edging boards in no time.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #69 on: November 05, 2019, 06:09:12 PM »
This mornings work was to machine a "cap plate" for the gear reducer, and the riser which will support one end of the overhead shafts. The reducer output shaft was shortened, and a sprocket which formerly had a 3/8" bore was "sleeved" to go on the 1/4" reducer output shaft. I am rapidly approaching the point where I have to make a firm decision on whether I use toothed belts and pulleys or machine my own pulleys from aluminum and use rubber O-rings as drive belts. Seeing as I just spent over $500 yesterday for a new milling vice, I'm pretty sure what the answer is going to be.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #70 on: November 05, 2019, 08:54:45 PM »
An executive decision has been made. I'm going to make my own pulleys and use o-ring drive belts. Originally I had all the pulleys at 2 1/2" diameter, but I have changed that to 2.0" because that is what stock I have. I have stolen the 25 tooth gears off of the reversing winch, because I doubt that I will ever use the reversing winch again.

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #71 on: November 05, 2019, 10:41:24 PM »
An executive decision has been made. I'm going to make my own pulleys and use o-ring drive belts.

Brian; you know... you can't take it with you  :lolb:

I'm sure the o-rings will work just fine. :ThumbsUp:
Craig

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #72 on: November 06, 2019, 02:26:15 PM »
I have an issue. The roller chain that connects the reducer output sprocket to the two textured rollers has no method of tensioning the chain. That's okay, because I can adjust the tension by moving the entire reducer up or down by using spacer blocks until the correct chain tension is reached. (Note that the actual chain itself is not shown in this model.) The problem comes from the fact that the overhead shaft bearing support which is bolted to the reducer moves up or down as the reducer does. The other bearing support which bolts to the side of the edger frame does not. This is a perfect application for self aligning bushings, which are a two piece affair, where the bushing has a spherical outside and the housing it sets in has a spherical inside, but a normal round outside diameter. I need four of these, to support the two 1/2" diameter overhead shafts. There are other things that I can do, but not as neatly as these self aligning bushings would allow. I'm looking for a source for these self aligning bushings that are inexpensive and available in Canada, and I haven't been able to find one.---Brian

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #73 on: November 06, 2019, 05:50:17 PM »
That seems to work out just about perfect with the #35 chain in place and 1/4" of spacers underneath the gear reducer. I am going to make a plywood sub-base to mount the edger and the reducer to, as seen in the previous post. I can then fine-tune the spacers to give the proper chain tension.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Old School Sawmill Edger
« Reply #74 on: November 07, 2019, 01:11:31 AM »
It keeps growing and growing---Tomorrow I will build the plywood sub base and get everything anchored to it before I start messing with shafts and bushings. I haven't built any of the anti-kickback system, but I do have holes drilled and tapped on the infeed side of the main frame. My kid who works at Fastenal is supposedly getting a piece of 1/16" square keystock for me---if he remembers.