Author Topic: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864  (Read 5190 times)

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #45 on: October 16, 2019, 04:32:33 PM »
Hi Jim,
You are right; 1:24.

The overall length of the steam launch is 22 1/2". Its width is 5".

I have made only one ship previous to this one, but from what I read, fairing is usually done when the bulwarks are glued in place on the keel. The buwarks can then be 'faired' to follow the curve of the ship.

This model is constructed in a different way. The fore and aft bulwarks are faired before they are glued into place.

How? Kudos to the designer Bob Crane for showing the bevel  lines right on the bulwarks. They have been deternimed in CAD and laser engraved into the frame.

Note also that the location of the strakes have also been laser engraved.  :ThumbsUp:

Online Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1716
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #46 on: October 16, 2019, 05:43:08 PM »
Hi Jim,
You are right; 1:24.

The overall length of the steam launch is 22 1/2". Its width is 5".

I have made only one ship previous to this one, but from what I read, fairing is usually done when the bulwarks are glued in place on the keel. The buwarks can then be 'faired' to follow the curve of the ship.

This model is constructed in a different way. The fore and aft bulwarks are faired before they are glued into place.

How? Kudos to the designer Bob Crane for showing the bevel  lines right on the bulwarks. They have been deternimed in CAD and laser engraved into the frame.

Note also that the location of the strakes have also been laser engraved.  :ThumbsUp:

Thanks John,

That is a nice size boat model. Much easier to work with. I've had the Model Shipways model of Howard Chapelle's pinky schooner "Glad Tidings" for years that is on the someday list. It's also 1:24 scale.

Took me a bit to understand what you were talking about until I figured out that you're talking about "bulkheads" not "bulwarks" (or "moulds" as they're sometimes called). That really is a well thought out kit. Now you just need to build a miniature "ships bandsaw" to saw them to shape.  :)

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #47 on: October 16, 2019, 06:55:44 PM »
Hi Jim,
Yes, 1/2" to the foot is very nice.

Sorry about the terminology. I've learned something there.

To angle the 'bulkheads', I'm using a belt sander that has a table that will tip up. You have to be able to see the engraved lines to determine the angle. If I can't tip the table any more, I'll make a wooden angled table to clamp to the existing sanding table.


Offline mklotz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2419
  • LA, CA, USA
    • SOFTWARE FOR PEOPLE WHO BUILD THINGS!
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #48 on: October 16, 2019, 07:15:21 PM »
Rather than build an angled table, buy one of these...

https://www.amazon.com/Mayes-10156-Protractor-Angle-Finder/dp/B002Q7B7XE/ref=sr_1_59?crid=ZCRUCZZQDUJ9&keywords=angle+finder&qid=1571249495&sprefix=angle+%2Caps%2C226&sr=8-59

You will find other uses for it around the house.  No batteries required.
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2019, 07:55:39 PM »
Hi Marv,
Thanks for the suggestion. Good instrument.

But it wouldn't work here. Yoy need to build a table that starts you off at a severe angle,

Like this...

Now I have infinite control over the angle by watching the laser burned edge of the part, watch the cut and change the angle by eye unit the lower edge of the burnt edge disappears.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Fairing
« Reply #50 on: October 16, 2019, 08:29:41 PM »
The result.
You can still see the engraved lines. I think I'll leave them. In the end, there probably will be some tweaking with a sandpaper block anyway to sweeten the curves of the overall hull.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
The Cockpit
« Reply #51 on: October 18, 2019, 12:46:53 PM »
1.  The floor

2. The seats

Offline Art K

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1232
  • Madison, Wisconsin USA
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #52 on: October 18, 2019, 04:26:49 PM »
J.L.
Looks great, don't think I ever watched a model boat go together before.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13791
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2019, 04:33:47 PM »
Great stuff as always John. May have to try one of these ship models one day.

Bill


Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Midships
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2019, 08:49:48 PM »
Hi Art,
What I'm doing so far is fun. It's when we get to the planking that things get a little squirrelly if you don't have experiene with it.  And I don't!  ;D

Hi Bill,
If you do, go for someting in large scale.  ;)

The floor and the coal bunkers...

P.S. The smudges are coal dust. May use some more of that 4B pencil.


Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9595
  • Rochester NY
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #55 on: October 18, 2019, 09:31:23 PM »
I'm a little surprised they have you do the interior parts before the planking, I usually do the planking first so I can run clamps around the frames. Lots of ways to do every job!

Offline Art K

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1232
  • Madison, Wisconsin USA
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2019, 09:36:49 PM »
John,
Good thing for you, now you are going to get that experience.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #57 on: October 18, 2019, 10:19:20 PM »
You are right Chris. But the design of this boat means that there is very little to the bulkheads. They snap so easily.  There is basically nothing to them along the keel midships with the deep cut for the steam plant.

I think that is why they want the floors to support the frames. The bunkers help as well.

No problems fore though. the bulkheads are solid.

John

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9595
  • Rochester NY
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #58 on: October 18, 2019, 10:54:28 PM »
You are right Chris. But the design of this boat means that there is very little to the bulkheads. They snap so easily.  There is basically nothing to them along the keel midships with the deep cut for the steam plant.

I think that is why they want the floors to support the frames. The bunkers help as well.

No problems fore though. the bulkheads are solid.

John
That makes sense!    :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1909
Re: U.S.N. Picket Boat No. 1 1864
« Reply #59 on: October 19, 2019, 03:45:59 PM »
Hi Chris,

I reread the reasons for workig from the inside out and found a sentence that summarizes our discussion well:

"The structure has now gained considerable strength and stiffness and is ready for planking."

Bob Crane, 2010


« Last Edit: October 19, 2019, 04:23:21 PM by J.L. »