Author Topic: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine  (Read 10713 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #120 on: October 17, 2019, 01:57:29 AM »
"steam chest base (which will be screwed in place, not soldered)"

Agree absolutely Chris.........

Soft soldered  :facepalm: could move or fall apart when 286.703 degrees F or 40 PSI is reached
Silver soldered  :ThumbsDown: ......too much heat & possible distortion + hone polishing the cylinder bores after the process

Will you just use conventional brown paper gaskets? with your funny US sized bolt designations :lolb:

Derek
Why so low a temperature? Tix is that low, I thought most soft solders were more like 400f? There will only be two small passages through this seam, so not much area for pressure. I use a automotive gasket paper, treated fiber, have great luck with it. I have tried brown paper in the past, always had problems with it being porous across the width, along the fibers, got the auto type and always get a good seal. By keeping it a separate piece it will be easier to machine too, given it has four ports per valve and three pipe connections.


And I use both Inferial and mentrical threads!  :Lol:   Not good enough with the mill yet to need my old micron ruler from my image science days though (have some 25 & 50x magnifiers with micron reticles in them from my old w*rk days)


 :cheers:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #121 on: October 17, 2019, 02:00:02 AM »
Chris,
The cylinders and glands look great!
Sounds like you've got the flywheel figured out.   You just have to do it now :)
Kim
Just have to wait for it to arrive! I am hoping thier casting quality is as good as in the vise kit I made. It will require putting the riser blocks back on the lathe.

Online mike mott

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #122 on: October 17, 2019, 01:55:08 PM »
Quote
I thought most soft solders were more like 400f?
Chris I am using Worthington 97/3 melts at 444f  or 229c at 35 psi saturated steam is 142c so I am confident that the 97/3 will be fine. even at 80psi saturated steam is only 162c

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #123 on: October 17, 2019, 05:27:24 PM »
Quote
I thought most soft solders were more like 400f?
Chris I am using Worthington 97/3 melts at 444f  or 229c at 35 psi saturated steam is 142c so I am confident that the 97/3 will be fine. even at 80psi saturated steam is only 162c

Mike
Thats more in line with what I had figured - thanks! 


On mine, I am going to hold the base on with screws, so wont be soldering it anyway, but its good to know the options for future builds.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #124 on: October 17, 2019, 05:29:02 PM »
This morning got the blanks for the steam chest bases, chests, and lids cut out from larger bar stock and milled down to size (leaving room for bosses needed for connections).

With that done, will probably mill out the center of the steam chest next, then start drilling holes...

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #125 on: October 17, 2019, 06:05:06 PM »
The mailman just dropped off the flywheel I ordered from Martin Model, a 5" curved spoke cast iron wheel, about 4 pounds. Looks like a good match to the rest of the parts size-wise, should work out well. There appears to be plenty of extra material to get the wheel trued up.

Before any cutting on it, it needs some fondling and aging time, according to the folks across the pond...  ;D

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #126 on: October 17, 2019, 09:41:55 PM »
While examining/fondling the flywheel, noticed that the hub had some taper to it which would make holding it with the 4-jaw chuck un-secure, so was playing around with the faceplates to figure out a good way to secure it for truing up and hub boring. I was curious to see how the cast iron in the flywheel would cut, so clamped it down on the mill table to flatten off the casting sprue remnant, and also milled in some little flats on all four sides for the 4-jaw to hang onto.

The alloy Martin uses cuts like butter, very nice and smooth (just like the metal in the little vise kit did) - very happy with that. The last big flywheel I did was on the MEM Corliss build, where I used a cut-off of a large bit of iron plumbing pipe - that stuff was nasty to cut, lots of variation in hardness.
With the riser blocks on the lathe, should be able to hold it with the 4-jaw to drill/bore for a taper-lock hub, and true up the first side - then will use the taper lock to grip onto a centered bit of crankshaft bar and true up the second side. This wheel is heavy enough that it should keep the lathe spinning for a bit after turning off the motor!

Will probably do that work while alternating with milling out the steam chests - fun to be able to alternate tasks over a few days.

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #127 on: October 17, 2019, 10:27:05 PM »
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Following along Chris.  Everything looks great.
Craig

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #128 on: October 17, 2019, 11:22:18 PM »
:popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Following along Chris.  Everything looks great.
:cheers:

Offline derekwarner

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #129 on: October 18, 2019, 05:34:41 AM »
"Why so low a temperature? Tix is that low, I thought most soft solders were more like 400f?"

......well Chris, what pressure steam do you plan?

We won't have to worry, but even the better soft solder grades have  :old: temperature related fluidization issues/strengths especially in joints when subjected to force or under pressure

Not the soldered wetted joint area, but the surface area  :hammerbash: subjected to the pressure at the elevated pressure

Derek
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
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Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #130 on: October 18, 2019, 10:19:37 AM »
Nice looking casting Chris. Martin machine is located about 80 miles from me.

Looks like you could of made use of my handy dandy flywheel holder that I made for my P & W flywheels:







Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #131 on: October 18, 2019, 01:38:51 PM »
Slick flywheel holder Jim!   :ThumbsUp:

Offline Art K

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #132 on: October 18, 2019, 04:38:26 PM »
Chris,
Still following along, great progress. Jim that is a real slick fixture for turning a flywheel. I will have to file that away for future reference.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #133 on: October 18, 2019, 11:24:24 PM »
Today I got on a roll  ::)   with the flywheel. Put the riser blocks back on the lathe, and got the flywheel mounted in the 4-jaw chuck. It took a little experimenting to find a happy medium spot for it, since the two sides of the casting were slightly mis-aligned from each other (plenty of extra material is there to true it up, so no problem there). Started cutting on the rim first, evening up the outside then moved in to true up the hub.

Several places where the 'skin' on the casting was a little tough to cut through, the inside was nice and even, cuts nicely. Then put the other tool in to do the inside of the rim:

I am going to make up the taper-lock hub and use that to hold it to finish the second side, so next step is to drill the hub to the diameter of the crankshaft:

Put on the compound cross-slide (don't have Sherlines riser for that, but a hardwood block sufficed) and set it to 6 degrees, cut the taper through the center hole:

Took the 4-jaw and wheel off, and chucked up a piece of stainless bar to make the locking part of the hub - turned that to a matching taper, with a little of the taper still sticking out of the hub. Doesn't show well in this picture, but this piece is drilled to match the crankshaft too - the taper runs down to the hole.


Parted off the lock:

Here is what it looks like in the flywheel:

Next time I will put the flywheel on the mill (will screw the 4-jaw onto the rotary table) to drill/tap the holes through the lock and into the flywheel hub for the screws that will tighten the lock into the hole, compressing it around the crankshaft (there will be a slit made down one side of the lock so it can flex). One thing I learned years ago from Chuck (basically learned this whole setup from him) is to also put screws in to push the lock back out of the flywheel, since once tightened it is very hard to pop it back out again without damaging anything. It may work out that on this one I can put nuts on the tightening screws, between the lock and the hub, to perform that function. If so, then I'll just need two screws. This type of mount works very well, and does not tend to tip the flywheel like a grub screw would. The only downside is that it requires a large enough diameter on the hub for the lock and the screws - this casting was picked partly since it had a larger hub than some of the other choices.
 :cheers:

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Marion Valve Winding Engine
« Reply #134 on: October 18, 2019, 11:39:57 PM »
 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Hi Chris, I noticed you gave no marquee warning about bad puns when you wrote the "on a roll with the flywheel"  :Lol:  Puns should be shameless anyway...... :Jester:

Like the look of the tapered collet to hold the flywheel "in whack" (as opposed to it getting out of whack)  :facepalm:   :cheers: