Author Topic: Crossley Otto Langen  (Read 9838 times)

Offline Jasonb

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7175
  • Surrey, UK
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #30 on: September 21, 2019, 04:13:45 PM »
It's for a governor, not timing gears.

Those look a lot better Craig

Offline Jo

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13334
  • Hampshire, england.
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #31 on: September 21, 2019, 04:24:39 PM »
They look to run ok for a model Craig  :ThumbsUp:

The ratio of the two gears in comparison with the original engine gears also looks right  :)

Jo

Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Craig DeShong

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
  • Raleigh,NC. USA
    • Lauson small engines
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #32 on: September 21, 2019, 07:28:26 PM »
Brian.  1 to three is what I need.  Thanks for your concern.
Craig

Offline Craig DeShong

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
  • Raleigh,NC. USA
    • Lauson small engines
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2019, 11:22:59 PM »
Jason and Jo, Thanks for your comments.  Thanks for those of you who stop by to silently see what Iím doing.

Today is my last visit with gears for a while (did I hear a cheer? Might have come from me  :embarassed:, I'm about ready to do something else).  While I had the dividing head on the mill and all setup with the appropriate angle, and while I have the procedure fresh in my mind (yea, we old guys do tend to forget things now and again :noidea:) I thought Iíd go ahead and make the drive gear in steel for the actual model.  Iíd like to go ahead and make the pinion gear also but Iím not so sure of how it attaches to the governor yet so it will have to wait.
 
Here are two photos of the finished gear, looking a lot like the gear on the full size- except that up thread you might have noticed that the shoulder on the original gear is on the gear teeth side; no way for me to fabricate the gear in that way that comes to mind. 




Craig

Online b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13827
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2019, 01:13:05 AM »
Great progress Craig. The clutch is a real jewel too. Thanks for showing its fabrication.

Bill

Offline Jasonb

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7175
  • Surrey, UK
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2019, 07:14:12 AM »
Came out good, short of silver soldering the gear onto a boss there is no easy way to have cut it with the equipment we have. The original would have been done with a machine more like a shaper so the groove between boss and teeth would have provided run out for the tool.

Offline kvom

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2259
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2019, 10:51:57 AM »
I have only seen one other shop that had a Volstro.  There were a couple for sale at the CF consignment table this year, but were overpriced and got no takers.

Nice job on the gears.  I will be trying to make a pair of bevels for the Greene's governor sometime in the future.

Offline fumopuc

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2555
  • Munich, Germany, EU
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2019, 07:35:57 AM »
Hi Craig, I am following along quietly, a very interesting build report.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline Craig DeShong

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
  • Raleigh,NC. USA
    • Lauson small engines
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #38 on: September 28, 2019, 11:20:57 PM »

Bill, Jason, Kirk, and Achim; thanks for your comments and encouragement.  Thanks also to those stopping by to see the latest posts.

Iíve been putting in some marathon design days as of late on this project and the design is pretty much complete and firmed up at this point.  Iím going to go ahead and order the cast iron for the cylinder liner and the aluminum for the cylinder column and base next week.

While thatís on the way Iím going to have a thorough go-though with the design; looking for inconsistencies and errors.  Itís much easier to make corrections to the ďvirtualĒ model before you start cutting metal and run into problems.

Winter will be setting in long before I get near completing this model. therefore Iím not taking time to make the drawings ďprettyĒ with a lot of drawing numbers, identifying text, etc.  There will be many cold days this winter with the shop too cold to occupy and therefore nothing to do and I can go back and retrofit all that then.  Iím anxious to get started on the build and Iím hoping to start actual construction in another several weeks.

Iíve included some images of the design from my design tool.  These images donít really do the design justice.  Itís really cool to get into the model with the design tool and check all the tolerances and interference.  Also it's neat to "work" the engine by moving the shafts and levers around and watching the interplay among the various parts.  Unfortunately, I can't show this to you so you're stuck with just the few images I've shown you.

This is a front erection drawing.  The flywheels will be castings (the only ones on the model) but Iíve drawn them too see relative scale.  These will machine out to around a 10 inch diameter.


Here is the same drawing as above, but a better look at the detail in the head.  There are lots of moving parts; the functions of which Iím planning to describe as the build progresses.



Now I show you a view of the base with a little detail of the piston and valve.  As I did with my other Otto Langen, the valve will cycle opposite the full size.  On the full size, the valve moves from center position down to let in fuel and air to the cylinder plus light the carrier pilot within the valve, then full up to fire the engine, then center again to exhaust the spent gasses.

Since Iím using spark ignition, my valve motion will first move up and allow the fuel and air to enter the cylinder, then full down where a push rod under the valve will close a switch to fire the spark plug, then center to release the spent gasses.  Ií m taking a liberty here with the model to help with functionality.



Lastly I show an erection image from the rear of the engine.  Here you can see the green (at least in this image) fly ball governor and the clutch I detail in a previous thread.

Craig

Offline Alyn Foundry

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1025
  • North Wales, Great Britain.
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2019, 11:37:35 AM »
Hi Craig.

The model is taking shape nicely, well done!

Have you considered using something proprietary for the cylinder? Perhaps a redundant hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder? A bore of 2" is not large but the stroke length you have not mentioned yet, might prove a little difficult to hone properly.

It's just a thought before you invest in that billet of cast Iron.

Cheers Graham.

Offline kvom

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2259
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2019, 05:07:03 PM »
As I offered to Chris, I can give you a length of 2"OD 1.5"ID honed hydraulic tube if you're willing to go with a smaller cylinder size.  This definitely gets around the problems of eliminating taper in a long bore.

Offline Craig DeShong

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
  • Raleigh,NC. USA
    • Lauson small engines
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #41 on: September 30, 2019, 09:52:00 PM »
Kirk:  did you get my message?  In short, iím Interested in the hydrolic cylinder.
Craig

Offline kvom

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2259
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2019, 10:32:56 PM »
I just noticed it.  Please try to give an accurate length needed.  The remaining tube is about 15" long (was 3' originally) so 9" would leave enough for another medium size engine.  I originally bought it from Bailey Hydraulics in Nashville, but they no longer list it on their website.  PM your address.

Offline wgrenning

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 8
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #43 on: October 02, 2019, 02:21:35 AM »
Great project Craig.  Thank you for sharing !   FYI, Here is the inside of the clutch from an early Deutz Otto Langen located at the Deutsches museum in Munich.  Note the similarity to the one you made.  As far as I know this is the only one made this way on an engine built by GasmotorenFabrik Deutz.
Builder of historical models / Restorer of engines

Offline Craig DeShong

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
  • Raleigh,NC. USA
    • Lauson small engines
Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #44 on: October 03, 2019, 12:44:07 AM »
Graham: Thanks for thinking ďout of the boxĒ for me, and many thanks to
Kirk: for offering the hydraulic cylinder.  That is going to help give me a good close piston/ring/cylinder fit.  That is a requirement with these engines since they run of relatively low pressures; the combustion of acetylene is merely a vehicle to lift the piston against the atmosphere.  The energy to run the engine is that energy as it is reclaimed.

Many thanks also to Wayne for stopping in, commenting,  and adding interest to this thread.

Thanks also for those of you interested enough in my project to silently stop by and see the latest progress.

I think Iíve spent the entire month of September at the computer designing this model.  Iíve just finished three more intensive days where I, basically, re-assembled the model logically, checking measurements.  A few errors were found and corrected.  At this point Iím confident enough to proceed with the construction. :whoohoo: 

I stopped off at the local Metal Supermarkets warehouse, which is located conveniently just a few miles up the road and acquired the aluminum for the base and the column.  Iíve also ordered the gear cutters that I donít have but Iíll need when I get around to cutting the spur gears.

Here is my drawing for the engine base.  The base is six inches in diameter and has a larger bottom section; then it slightly tapers through the column up to the ďtableĒ at the top of the engine (where all the action takes place).



The warehouse didnít have six inch aluminum rounds in stock but they did have this 6 x 2 ľ piece of bar so I set about making it round.



With it rounded on one edge, Iím boring out the chamber for the sleeve.  Iím just getting this roughly to shape.  Iíll do the final bore after Iíve attached the cylinder to the base since the sleeve is pressed down through both pieces.




Iíve designed the engine with a removable plate in the base so that it can be removed and the combustion chamber easily cleaned.  Iíve found from my first Otto Langen that it can get pretty cruddy after hours of running so Iím providing an easy access for cleaning.  Here Iím cutting the recess for this plate.



Now Iíve turned the piece around in the lathe and am working the top side of the base down to approximate diameter.


After making mountains of swarf, I called it a day.  I still need to face off the top to get down to the 1.812 measurement as called for in the prints.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2019, 03:01:07 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig