Author Topic: Crossley Otto Langen  (Read 1062 times)

Offline Craig DeShong

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Crossley Otto Langen
« on: September 03, 2019, 01:16:13 AM »
I built my first Otto Langen Atmospheric engine around six years ago.  It took about a year and a half to build it and another eighteen months to get it to run. :) As the years have passed Iíve learned a lot and have listened to advice given by those who have more experience that I  :old: (such as Wayne Genning) and now with much experience and excellent advice, the engine runs quite well.

Two years ago I was invited to the Rough and Tumble Engineers Association at Kinzers, Pennsylvania to bring my model and help celebrate the 150th year anniversary of their original Otto Lagen: the oldest running internal combustion engine in America.  While I was in attendance, the germ of this project was born.

The Rough and Tumble Engineers Association at that time had on loan from the Henry Ford Museum, their Crossley built Otto Langen.  Two years later, the Crossley engine is still on loan. 

I planned a trip to Kinzers (Rough and Tumble) this past August with the primary objective to get many detailed photos and measurements of the Crossley engine so that I could attempt a model of this engine.

So you can become familiar with this engine, I provide a photo of the engine as it currently resides at Rough and Tumble.


We were all remarking that this engine is an extremely well built machine; the folks at Crossley, way back when, built a magnificent machine.  Below I given you a closer photo of the front of the engine with the builders plate.



And a photo of the sign Rough and Tumble supplies with a few of the engine details.



Also a photo of the Crossley with Rough and Tumble's Otto Langen.
 Two original Otto Langen engines side by side; something you donít often get to see.



I canít speak highly enough about the folks at Kinzers.  They permitted me to get all the measurements and photos I needed.  Needless to say, care for the engine was paramount in my mind as I did this.



Now I know Jo is going to say, ďJeez, canít you build a model with CASTINGS?Ē.  Never fear Jo, Iíve purchased the flywheels already and they are castings. :cartwheel:  I scoured the internet and found these 11 inch flywheels that, when turned down to 10 inches, will very closely resemble the flywheels on the full size.  That makes the model at around 1/6th size.  These flywheels are HEAVY; this thing is gonna coast between hits "forever".



One last picture where I show my progress on the design of this engine.  Itís going to present some unique challenges, but then if there were no challenges, where would the fun lie?



The design is progressing slowly and Iím concentrating on getting the major measurements established.  Once thatís done, Iím thinking Iíll go back and try to make some of the major parts look more like the original casings.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2019, 01:21:08 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2019, 01:21:52 AM »
Interesting project Craig, looking forward to following along.

Dave

Offline steamer

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2019, 01:36:46 AM »
Nice project!   I'm looking forward to watching this one.

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline cheepo45

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2019, 01:38:09 AM »
Very cool project, Craig.
Good talking to you at the R+T Museum.
I will be watching with interest.
 Scott

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2019, 02:25:52 AM »
Great project Craig!
 I'm along for the ride.
 :popcorn:
 John

Online Jo

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2019, 07:12:40 AM »
Now I know Jo is going to say, ďJeez, canít you build a model with CASTINGS?Ē.  Never fear Jo, Iíve purchased the flywheels already and they are castings. :cartwheel:  I scoured the internet and found these 11 inch flywheels that, when turned down to 10 inches, will very closely resemble the flywheels on the full size.  That makes the model at around 1/6th size.  These flywheels are HEAVY; this thing is gonna coast between hits "forever".

 :D

It will be nice to see a model of the Crossley version of the Otto Langen being made.

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2019, 01:29:45 PM »
A wonderful project Craig. I am sure you will do it justice and end up with another fine version of this unique engine.

Bill

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2019, 01:49:21 PM »
Very interesting Craig. I will follow along and watch your progress.---Brian

Offline Alyn Foundry

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2019, 04:02:30 PM »
Hi Craig.

I too will be following with great interest.

Here's a link to a 3 HP engine, the largest size built by Crossley brothers of Manchester.


Currently installed at the Anson Engine museum near Stockport Manchester.

Cheers Graham.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2019, 07:21:00 PM by Alyn Foundry »

Offline kvom

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2019, 08:49:05 PM »
Better not underestimate ceiling height with that puppy/   ;D

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2019, 12:49:45 AM »
Dave, Dave, Scott, John, Jo, Bill, Brian, Graham, Kirk; thanks for stopping by and showing interest in this new project.  I believe itís going to be very interesting as it moves along.

Scott- GREAT to see you too at Kinzers; Iím thinking of making my appearance an annual event.  As I said before; itís a great show with LOTS of interesting people.

Iím glad Graham posted the video above.  You can see that the Crossley version of the Otto Langen fires and the piston immediately returns to the bottom of the cylinder with a governor mechanism that directly controls the escape of the pawl and ratchet.  This is distinctly different that the German built versions, where controlling the escape of the spent gasses controls the next cycle.

With hurricane Dorian slowly moving up the coast itís been a rainy day today, so I spent the day moving forward with the design of this engine.  Iíve finished the governor design and am well into the pawl release mechanism design.  Iíve included a few images of the main assembly for your purview, but itís hard to make out detail from what Iíve given you.  The current design is also probably fraught with errors and inconsistencies.  Designing an engine takes many hours (days).

Iíll be cutting all the gears for this engine, including the bevel gears that drive the governor.  Having never made bevel gears Iíve done a ďtrial runĒ in aluminum and everything came out fine.  Iím using the Ivan Law book and I canít recommend it high enough for anyone who contemplates making their own gear trains.  In a design like this you really need to get all the questionable stuff behind you because itís easy to design yourself into a dead end if you expect to be able to do something and it doesnít work out.

Well, enough blabberingÖ hereís a few images of the design to date.




Craig

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2019, 02:08:16 AM »
Good stuff there Craig!

 Not to derail this thread, but how long have you been running "SolidWorks"?

 I'm thinking about moving away from my current CAD. (PRO-E/CREO)

 JOHN

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2019, 02:57:53 AM »
Hi John

I'm using Alibre Professional.  I upgraded from "cubify" about a year ago.  I used cubify for around two years previously.
Craig

Online Jasonb

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2019, 07:00:27 AM »
Craig, are you on maintenance as that does not look like the current version or just running in the old legacy mode?

It's going to be an interesting one to watch, which will you build first this or that upright you drew earlier in the year?

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Crossley Otto Langen
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2019, 01:42:17 PM »
Jason, Thanks for your interest. 

The Alibre folks sold me a life-time licence for the current version at the time of sale for a very attractive price.  I suspect, as time passes, my version will get a little "long in the tooth".  As a modeler, I can't see needing all the bells and whistles of the newer versions, since they probably concentrate on 3D printing, something I'll never be able to afford.  Down the road it will be interesting to see if a windows update permanently breaks my version and how the Alibre folks will address that.

What do you mean by "old legacy mode?"

I still have the Regal design on the back burner; even have a nice chunk of aluminum set aside for the frame.  I suspect I'll get to it eventually.  My plans are to build the Crossley when I have completed the design.  Making a model of the Crossley Otto Langen has been rattling around in my mind ever since I first saw the full size a few years ago.  It currently has my interest so that is what receives my attention.

This is the first model I've designed with the Alibre product where I'm familiar enough with the tool so that my concentration can remain on designing the model and not be drawn off to concentrating on "driving the tool".  I'm in a mode where I design a few components and then assemble those components into sub-assemblies, then the sub-assemblies into a main assembly.  From there I can take measurements and either "tweak" the existing components as necessary or use that information in the design of more components, building on that principal until the design is complete.  In reality you're building the model, logically, within the computer.  It's a new way of thinking for me.

Also, I'm planning on making a full set of drawings with the intention that someone else (besides me) could build the model using them.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2019, 02:00:38 PM by Craig DeShong »
Craig