Author Topic: Casting brass  (Read 721 times)

Offline Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 25
Casting brass
« on: July 21, 2019, 12:36:49 AM »
I have an unlimited supply of brass such as taps, tap spindles and other plumbing parts.

How hard is it to cast brass into barstock for turning on the lathe? Is it within the realm of a backyarder?
Kind regards,

Jim

Offline steam guy willy

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2256
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2019, 02:43:16 AM »
I think you may have to add various other things to the mix like flux and stuff but not too sure....
Willy

Offline Pete49

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 654
  • top of the gulf SA, Gateway to the Flinders Ranges
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2019, 04:51:08 AM »
If cast iron can be done in the backyard I can't see why not. There is a forum, whose name escapes me at the moment..???avenue?, and backyard metal casting are 2 from memory.
I used to have a friend.....but the rope broke and he ran away :(

Offline Bluechip

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 821
  • Derbyshire
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2019, 09:43:00 AM »
If cast iron can be done in the backyard I can't see why not. There is a forum, whose name escapes me at the moment..???avenue?, and backyard metal casting are 2 from memory.

http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/forum.php                       ??


 :thinking:

Dave

Offline Mcgyver

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 174
  • Toronto
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2019, 01:07:19 PM »
How hard is it to cast brass into barstock for turning on the lathe? Is it within the realm of a backyarder?

I would say no.  The casting part is possible (but is challenging given the zinc wants to burn off before the copper is melted).  More the issue is what do you end up for bar stock.  Lots of brasses are no fun to machine, its 360 free cutting brass that is the brass we know and love.  imo there's about zero chance of taking a bunch of basically mystery yellow metal and getting something that will resemble turning the brass (360) you want. 

I think you'd be ahead take what you've got to the scrapper and buy 360 bar stock.  I guess it also depends on where you're at - if an experience foundryman with all the tackle its a little different proposition to try than from a standing start
 
« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 01:32:37 PM by Mcgyver »

Online maury

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
    • Lone Star Engine Works
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2019, 01:40:35 PM »
Jim, if you have to have 360, buy it.
If you are wanting to make brass or bronze parts it's easy to cast. I have done it many times, and it has always worked out well. one question I have is: if you are going to cast, why not make a pattern and just make a casting? I have made castings, and also put a bar on the pattern board for making bearings.

I cast what I call junk yard bronze. I make a mix of brass, yellow brass, and copper to get the color I want. I also add a little 50/50 plumbing solder to the mix if I want a softer alloy. you have to experiment a bit.

Good luck
maury
Lone Star Engine Works  reitred
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline ART

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 30
Re: Casting brass
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2019, 05:04:32 PM »
Hello Jim, I, also, have recast brass bar stock from " scrap" pieces. In fact I manage to capture most of my swarf when I machine known 360 brass parts and put that in the mix as well. Most of the "bars are actually round stock under 1.00 The others are correct that that resulting alloy is a little harder to machine, and I find that I get some inclusions, but if the parts are not critical or will be painted then go ahead. I also cut up any copper pipes I find and get some tin off of e-bay. Weigh out the copper and tin to 90/10 ratio, melt the copper then add the tin to the melt, and you will get an usable bronze. I use this mix to cast small flywheels. I hope this helps, but be careful. Art