Author Topic: The Dickson!  (Read 18466 times)

Offline Dennis

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #120 on: February 14, 2020, 04:59:03 PM »
Hi Maury,

Look at all those valves!! Well done!  can't wait to see them at NAMES. 

John, The valve bank is designed to let the engine run on one, two or three cylinders depending on the dynamo load demand.  You can also choose which one or two of the three cylinders you want the engine to run on.  A very wide range of operation and steam efficiency for the time.  The dynamos are also designed so that one or both can be taken off like to further conserve steam during low demand periods. A unique piece of steam history.  It is also interesting to know that the Dickson co eventually merged with another manufacturer and became Allis-Chalmers who built some great large engines.  The dynamos were made by the Edison Co.  If you make it to NAMES, I will try to have some of the history written up and available there.

The power station in NY had seven of these monsters all lined up in a row.  We have some photos of the original installation at the power station.  This was the first time a large marine engine was direct coupled with dynamos.  The engine at Henry Ford Museum has dynamos stamped #3 and #4 so we believe it was the second engine set installed at the NY power station.

Dennis

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #121 on: February 14, 2020, 05:27:28 PM »
Fascinating! That's some real good thinking!

 Thank you for the explanation, quite a fabulous piece of machinery.

 John

Offline maury

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #122 on: February 15, 2020, 07:21:02 PM »
Thanks for tuning in guys, thanks for the valve explanation dennis.
maury
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline maury

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #123 on: February 22, 2020, 09:05:15 PM »
Folks, I started working on the cat Walk, and have a little progress to show. I started by modeling the support brackets. There are 3 different styles, best I can tell form the pictures I have. Dennis developed the top view outline of the walk, and I modeled from that and the pictures.

I decided to make patterns for the support brackets, as I would like to cast them from bronze. I have two styles done so far, so the pictures are below.

maury
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline Dennis

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #124 on: February 23, 2020, 02:42:12 PM »
Hi Maury,
Nice looking patterns, thanks for modeling the brackets and making the patterns.  I look forward to seeing the cast parts.

Dennis

Offline Dennis

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #125 on: April 07, 2020, 03:43:54 PM »
Good Morning everyone, Maury and I were planning to show our work on the Dickson project at the NAMES show this year but since that show is cancelled, I thought I would post some new information on the Dynamos here.  Maury has focused on the engine build while I made patterns and drawings.  My shop time is focused on the dynamo build.

The dynamos have a ring winding which fell from favor among the dynamo builders because of the difficulty of winding the armature coils.  As the model armature goes together I am beginning to understand that decision much better.  The armature windings have to be threaded onto the ring by hand, one loop at a time.  With 70 coils on each armature, that is a lot of hand winding.  As Maury says, that's what modeling is all about.  I am trying to stay as close as I can to the original engine and dynamo design, however, I chose to use multiple wrap windings in place of the square bar single windings on the original dynamos in hopes of developing enough current at low RPM to run something in the finished display.

Photo 1 shows the hub and framework that hold the iron laminations for the armature core.  The iron core consists of 5 laminations of ductile iron rings about .280 wide.  A modern generator or motor has thin laminations but this was the state of the art in 1905 and I have the original drawings showing the laminations about 4.5 inches thick.

Photo 2 shows how the armature carrier goes together

Photo 3 shows the temporary armature assembly with bolts so that the winding slots could be cut in the assembly.  After cutting the winding slots, the armature was disassembled and cleaned.  Then the hub, framework parts and laminations were insulated with a polymide electrical insulation tape and reassembled with insulated rivets.  I first tried to cut the winding slots with a .125 end mill.  That turned out to be extremely slow and broke several end mills.  After a couple of slots, I re-designed to have a 5/32 wide slot and purchased a 5/32 slotting saw which worked very well.

Photo 4 shows the solid works model of the assembled dynamo to show where this is all going.

I am now working on the field coil posts and getting ready to wind the first field coil which will be done on a small coil winding machine I purchased on e-bay.  Another new experience for me as I have never wound an electrical coil.  I'll add some photos in a week or two showing how that part of the project goes.

Dennis

Offline jeff l

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #126 on: April 07, 2020, 04:16:43 PM »
outstanding!

Offline scc

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Re: The Dickson!
« Reply #127 on: April 07, 2020, 08:45:23 PM »
Dennis and Maury,   great progress on an excellent project. I love that engine and the way that it and the generators can be switched in or out as well as the cylinders. Clever thinking back then.  Thanks for posting all the details. I love it  :popcorn: :popcorn:       Terry