Author Topic: MEM Corliss Attempt  (Read 3790 times)

Offline Larry

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MEM Corliss Attempt
« on: May 26, 2019, 03:05:19 AM »
To paraphrase an old saying "I may have bitten off more than I can chew" may very well apply here but we will see where this goes. I must confess that I started this last July with a few simple parts. I did not have anything in my scrap that could be used for the block and didn't want to progress any further until I gave this a try. I ordered a piece of 12L14 from McMaster-Carr and drove over to their distribution center to pick it up. I was impressed with their facility. There are 3 excellent build logs that I know about & have studied:
Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss (Arnold b - Arnold)
Vince's version of the MEM Corliss (Vcutajar - Vince)
Chris Built-up MEM Corliss build (Crueby - Chris)

Getting started with a couple of pictures - cut the bar to approximate length allowing enough to finish the ends. Used a small face mill to square up the sides.

Online crueby

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2019, 03:34:02 AM »
Hi Larry,


The MEM Corliss is well worth the effort for chewing on, wonderful engine. Take it one step at a time, and you will get there. Great to see another one under way, and I will be watching along, sure to have plenty of company.


 :popcornsmall:


Chris

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2019, 03:51:10 AM »
This is great Larry. Looking forward to following along as well.

Bill

Offline Jo

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2019, 06:35:16 AM »
Nice to see another being built.  :)

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline vcutajar

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2019, 08:26:04 AM »
Hi Larry

Nice to see another MEM Corliss being built.  Will be surely following your progress as it will evoke good memories of when I did mine.

Vince

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2019, 03:31:01 AM »
I have very little experience in using a 4 jaw chuck but decided I could get a better finish in the lathe. I centered the block as best as I could with a dial indicator. I started the center hole with about a 1/4" drill & progressed up to about 7/8"  so I could use my 3/4" boring bar. I was very well pleased with the bore except there is about .004 difference in hole diameter from end to end. Hopefully that can be worked out later with a hone or some other method.
Begin boring.
Begin boring.
Facing ends to length.
Facing ends to length.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2019, 04:09:51 AM »
I laid out the dimensions for the steam / exhaust passage holes & the associated recess / flat surface for drilling. I do not have an angle vise so I clamped the block in my mill vise using 5 & 10 degree angle blocks & double checked with an angle meter. I then milled a flat surface, center drilled & drilled 5 passage holes.

Block marked  for steam / exhaust passage holes.
Block in vise on 5 & 10 degree angle blocks with angle meter.
Block - located "Y" dimension with edge finder, located "X" dimension using scribe pointer (Probably not the best way but I think it will work & be close enough).
Mill recess with flat surface for steam / exhaust passage holes.
Center drill for steam / exhaust passage holes.
Drill steam / exhaust passage holes.
Holes on one side complete.
View of holes from inside bore.

Online crueby

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2019, 04:21:08 AM »
Well done, following along...


 :popcornsmall:

Offline JackPick

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2019, 06:05:53 AM »
I'll be following too Larry. I'm considering this for my next build.
Cheers John

Offline Jim Nic

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2019, 09:47:25 AM »
Nice result on the steam passages Larry.  The engine is coming along nicely.
Jim
The person who never made a mistake never made anything.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2019, 03:00:44 PM »
You are really coming along on that cylinder Larry. Following along here too so please keep it coming :)

Bill

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2019, 07:29:25 PM »
Hello Larry,

Nice work on the cylinder.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2019, 02:56:49 AM »
Thanks guys for the kind comments. The next few pictures show drilling, reaming & threading for valves & valve bonnets.

Drilled holes for valves.
Reamed 1/4" holes for valves.
Drilled holes for valve bonnets.
Threaded #2-56 holes for valve bonnets.

Online crueby

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2019, 03:30:10 AM »
Moving right along with the build, great progress.


 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Jim Nic

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2019, 10:24:40 AM »
Moving right along there Larry.
Considering the valves and bonnets, the plan calls for 2 piece valves.  I made mine in one piece, and if my memory serves me correctly, as did Vince Cutajar.  I also made a recess in the bonnet to take a small O ring seal although I'm not sure this is really necessary.
Jim



The person who never made a mistake never made anything.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2019, 04:54:59 AM »
Thanks Jim Nic for the information & pictures on the valves. You are correct - Vince & Arnold both made one piece valves. I just looked it up. I have not progressed that far but it looks like that may be the way to go. I will make note of it.

Centered block in preparation for drilling cylinder cover holes. I did not get a picture of locating cylinder cover holes but that same operation will be shown when making the cylinder covers.

Chain drilled holes in preparation for milling steam chest pockets.

Offline tvoght

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2019, 06:58:37 PM »
I'll be following as time allows, Larry. Good progress photos & descriptions.
--Tim

Offline scc

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2019, 10:30:03 PM »
Me too :popcorn: enjoying every bit!           Terry

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2019, 03:49:58 AM »
Your comments are really appreciated. I completed drilling all the remaining hole patterns & milled the steam chest pockets.

Milling steam chest pockets (3 pictures).
Block side view (top).
Block opposite side view (bottom).
Block vertical view.

Offline vcutajar

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2019, 04:13:21 AM »
Cylinder block looking great.  That was very quick.

Vince

Offline kvom

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2019, 02:40:40 PM »
Holy holes batman!   :ThumbsUp:

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2019, 02:42:56 PM »
Swiss cheese anyone  :o. Seriously though, it looks great Larry!!

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2019, 03:23:43 AM »
Thanks again for the comments.  Vince, not really - those pictures of the block covered a period of 145 days - not working continuously.

I found a piece of scrap to use for the front cylinder cover. It was probably 1018 since it machined very well. I calculate my hole pattern (X & Y dimensions from center) using the co-ordinates for locating equally spaced holes in jig boring. I center the part in the mill using a CO-AX indicator & locate the holes using the DRO.

Cleaning up scrap piece to 1 5/8" diameter.
Facing end.
Drilling hole pattern (2 pictures).
Cut off.
Finished part.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2019, 04:26:53 AM »
I used a piece of 2" diam. 1018 steel for the rear cylinder cover. I faced & turned the .625 diam.; center drilled, drilled & reamed the .25 thru hole; bored & threaded 7/16-32 which is what I happened to have. Will continue in next post.

Facing 2" diam. 1018 steel.
Center drilled & drilled .25 thru hole.
Reamed .25 center thru hole.
Bored hole for threads.
Threaded 7/16-32.
Completed thread.

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2019, 10:22:16 AM »
Hello Larry,

Enjoying your work and following along.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Mike Bondarczuk

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2019, 11:04:01 AM »
Hi Larry,

Excellent build log so far and am enjoying the detail to attention as well as the progress.

Have downloaded the drawings and looking to see if I may build one as well in the very near future.

Mike
"Everything I can't find is in a totally secure place"

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2019, 04:38:13 AM »
Finishing the rear cylinder cover. I cut off the partially machined part & chucked the .625 diam. end in a collet & then turned the 1.125 diam. This finished the machining & I centered the part in the mill vise using a CO-AX indicator, then drilled the hole pattern.

Cut off.
Turning the 1.125 diam.
Center in mill vise with CO-AX indicator.
Drill hole pattern.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #27 on: June 06, 2019, 01:50:40 PM »
Looking good Larry!!  Those Coax indicators a nice to use...makes centering things a breeze.

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #28 on: June 08, 2019, 03:07:40 AM »
I made the steam & exhaust cover plates from a piece of 1/4" brass. After cutting to approximate length I cut the piece in half using a slitting saw (Thunk, Thunk, Thunk ). The sides & ends were milled to size and the outside edge hole pattern was drilled using the DRO to locate holes. The center 1/4" hole was drilled & reamed. The ends were milled to 1/8" leaving the 7/8" wide center section to be turned.

Cut in half with slitting saw.
Milling side to size.
Milling end to size.
Drilling outside edge hole pattern.
Drilled center 1/4" hole.
Reamed center 1/4" hole to size.
Milled each end to 1/8" leaving center section to be turned.
Partially finished steam & exhaust cover plates.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #29 on: June 08, 2019, 03:27:59 AM »
I took an idea from Vince but used a different method to turn the 7/8" wide center section. I made a small fixture from some scrap aluminum, located a center hole under the mill spindle, bolted the plate to the fixture using a spacer and centered under the mill spindle. Using the boring head with a boring bar inserted opposite the normal way, I ran the mill in reverse to turn the 7/8" diameter center section. The mill was used as a lathe and I was pleased with the final result.

Scrap aluminum fixture showing locating hole, locating pin, bolt & spacer.
Fixture with cover plate clamped in place.
Fixture with cover plate bolted in place & centered under mill spindle. Boring bar is ready to turn.
Turning partially complete.
Turning complete.
Finished plates.

Online Kim

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2019, 05:45:22 AM »
Nice work, Larry.

I thought I heard someone using a slitting saw earlier... (thunk, thunk, thunk).  :Lol:

Kim

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2019, 03:41:28 AM »
I made the Crosshead Guide in two pieces and put them together with Loctite 609. The guide was made from a piece of 1 1/8" 12L14 round bar. It was chucked in a collet and a 1/4" pilot hole was drilled. Using a series of drills I progressed up so I could use my 3/4" boring bar to finish a 7/8" diam. hole. It was cut to length & mounted in the mill vise. The slot was cut in several operations and finished with a 5/8" end mill.

Guide is bored to 7/8" diam.
Mounted in mill vise & slot cut to 5/8" (4 pictures).

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2019, 03:56:27 AM »
The flange was made from a piece of scrap. It was turned to size and the center hole bored to 1 1/8". It was then centered in the mill vise and the outer hole pattern was drilled using the DRO ( no pictures). The flange was cut off & faced to 1/8" thickness. The two parts were very carefully aligned & put together with Loctite 609. I would like to get a Loctite that didn't set up quite as fast.

Scrap piece chucked in 3 jaw & center hole bored to 1 1/8".
Flange is cut off.
Flange separated from scrap piece.
Flange & guide with Loctite 609.
Completed assembly.
Completed assembly.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2019, 02:26:24 PM »
More great progress Larry. Still following along with interest here.

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #34 on: June 16, 2019, 02:52:02 AM »
The gland nut was made from a piece of 5/8" hex brass rod. This was turned to 7/16" and threaded 7/16-32 since that is what I had available. A center hole was drilled & reamed to .251. The part was cut off to dimension & faced leaving a 1/8" wide x 5/8" hex nut on the end. I did not get a picture of the finished part but it will be shown later.

Turned to 7/16" diameter.
Threaded with a 7/16-32 die.
Drilling center hole.
Reaming center hole to .251 for piston rod.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #35 on: June 16, 2019, 04:04:00 AM »
The crosshead was made from a piece of 1" diameter brass rod turned to 7/8" (.875) diameter. The center hole was drilled 1/4" deep & threaded #10-32. It was then mounted in a collet block in the mill vise & the sides milled to 3/8" (.375) width. The center hole on the flat surface was drilled & reamed to .25 for the pin. The machined part was cut off & mounted in the mill vise & the ends milled to a finish length of 7/8" (.875).

Turn piece of 1" diameter brass rod to 7/8" (.875).
Drill center hole 1/4" deep.
Thread center hole #10-32.
Mount in collet block in mill vise & mill sides to 3/8" (.375) width.
Milling both sides to 3/8" (.375).
Drill center hole on flat surface & ream .25 for pin.
Cut off.
Mount in mill vise & finish end to 7/8" (.875) length.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2019, 02:12:35 PM »
Full steam ahead I see Larry. Always nice to see an update on this one.

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2019, 04:02:34 AM »
The piston rod was turned from a piece of 12L14 1/4" rod. Both ends were threaded #10-32 per dimensions.

Turned from 1/4"  12L14 rod & threaded both ends #10-32


Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #38 on: June 27, 2019, 04:15:43 AM »
The crosshead pin is composed of two parts - a screw and a pin both turned from a piece of 12L14  3/8" rod. Both pieces were threaded #10-32. A .040 screwdriver slot was milled in the end of each piece using a slitting saw.

Crosshead pin - two parts - turned from 12L14  3/8" rod & threaded #10-32. Screwdriver slot .040 in the end of each piece with slitting saw.


Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #39 on: June 27, 2019, 03:07:50 PM »
Very nice Larry, and I like seeing these smaller parts along with their respective drawings too.

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #40 on: July 01, 2019, 10:21:48 PM »
CRANKSHAFT - The crank was made from a piece of 5/16" 1018 steel and milled to shape. The small end was threaded #10-32. Both ends were radiused using filing buttons. The shaft is made from a piece of 3/8" 12L14 rod. Parts will be assembled later with Loctite 609. The 3/8" shaft hole is not shown on the drawing.

Crank with filing buttons.
Crank & Shaft not yet assembled.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #41 on: July 01, 2019, 10:45:07 PM »
CRANKPIN - The crankpin is turned to dimension from a piece of 12L14  1/2" rod. The end is threaded # 10-32. A .040 screwdriver slot was milled in the large end using a slitting saw.

Crankpin - finished.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2019, 11:31:48 PM »
Still looking great Larry. You are making good progress.

Bill

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2019, 11:54:32 PM »
Nice work Larry.

-Bob
Proud Member of MEM

My Engine Videos on YouTube-
http://www.youtube.com/user/Notch90usa/videos

Offline kvom

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #44 on: July 02, 2019, 12:20:20 AM »
Coming along smoothly.   :ThumbsUp:

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #45 on: July 06, 2019, 05:22:45 AM »
CYLINDER FOOT - The kind comments are appreciated. I plan to make the cylinder foot from 2 pieces & fasten together with screws. A piece of 3/4" scrap aluminum was cut to approximate size for the "T" sections. The pictures below will show the milling set up.

Raw material cut from 3/4" piece of scrap aluminum.
Milling surface with small face mill to square up the sides.
Milling one side of the "T" section.
Milling opposite side of the "T" section.
Finished "T" section - will cut in half.
"T" section cut in half for 2 feet - finishing ends.
Finished "T" section blanks - slot will be cut next.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #46 on: July 06, 2019, 02:24:14 PM »
Always good to see your updates Larry. Those look great so far.

Bill

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #47 on: July 15, 2019, 04:07:55 AM »
CYLINDER FOOT (continued) - The next operation was to cut the 1" x 5/16"  opening in the "T" section. I started by using a 1/2"  2 FL end mill at full depth. Disaster almost happened - the end mill began to pull out of the collet. Fortunately I caught it when the cut was deeper than my mark. I have had this happen when cutting steel but didn't think it would happen in aluminum - but it did. I should have known better. I then changed to a 3/8" end mill and cut the depth in .050 increments. The width was cut in .025 increments. As a result the depth of one opening is .035 more than the specified .313 on the drawing. I don't think this will affect the strength although it is a slight appearance factor.

8956 - "T" section in mill vise to cut opening.
8957 - "T" section with first cut.
8959 - "T" section with first cut to correct depth.
8961 - "T" section with opening partially finished.
8962 - "T" section with opening partially finished.
8964 - "T" section with opening complete.
27242 - "T" sections with openings complete. (Note depth of openings in the 2 pieces.)

Online Kim

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #48 on: July 15, 2019, 05:41:54 AM »
Those look very nice, Larry!

Interesting on the mill pulling out of the collet.  Do other people have this problem?  The only time I ever experiences something like that was when I forgot to tighten the collet!  I had it finger tight and had intended to come back and tighten it down, but forgot - till I noticed the depth changing. And for me, it got shallower, not deeper, since the forces pushed the mill up, not down.

What kind of collet are you using?  is it fitting right?  Is there some swarf stuck in the grooves preventing it from closing down properly?  This seems kind a bad to have your end mill move on you while it's in the collet!

Kim

Offline john mills

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #49 on: July 15, 2019, 09:57:12 AM »
Kim i have seen cutters  move if cutting on the sides .But i would not expect to have problems with these size of cuts even in steal.

the collet must be the right size for the cutter.and the collet chuck spotlessly cleaned.changing cutters with out
dismantling and cleaning is asking for swaf to end up where it is not wanted.then the collet and body can get marked briused and won't run true or may not tighten properly .check that the collet is not worn,if a cutter has
been moving it could also be slipping and can wear the collet. the nut needs to be tightened .
When i programmed cnc machines i did a lot of cutting out profiles in tool steel with ripper cutters i was very aware
of the possibility of slipping so with threaded cutters i was able to use collets with theaded nuts with the cutter screwed into but with the size cuts  and material used hear there should not be any problems.
 

Offline Elam Works

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #50 on: July 15, 2019, 04:09:16 PM »
Kim,

Yup, Under high side loading I have had helical endmills pull out of spring collets. Once leaving a 'mark of shame' in a table from a 1/4 endmill. Even with something like a industry standard ER16 collet holding a standard helical (not high helix) endmill. But also have had it happen with fairly shallow taper TG collets when trying to see how big a chip load I could create; i.e. intentionally pushing the limits with much bigger endmills (CAT 40 taper spindle). For that reason I really don't like the DA series collets except for drilling (angle too steep) and for heavy roughing cuts still use a cutter with a Weldon flat and a set screw. Especially since marking the table! In the UK, I believe they had cylindrical shank endmills that has a thread on the tail end just to stop them from pulling out of collets, though the EU has done its best to homogenize everything and eliminate individuality. It is pretty rare in model making, except when cutting soft metals with 2-flute endmills and a full slotting cut. Those tend to squirm around a bit and therefore are more prone to wiggle their way out of a collet. That is if the cutter does not choke on the chips and brake. For a similar reason I have found vibration on a side milling cut (even if not a heavy cut) is more prone to drive a taper up into the machine spindle and make it stick, that a heavy direct thrust from a large drilling op.


-Doug

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #51 on: July 18, 2019, 04:47:19 AM »
Kim-

I use a #2 MT collet in my mill and the 1/2" size gets used the most. My collets came with the mill when I bought it over 40 years ago so I suspect there is some wear. More than likely the situation as described by Doug was the main cause.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #52 on: July 18, 2019, 05:12:49 AM »
CYLINDER FOOT (Continued) - Mounting holes were marked & drilled in the top of the "T" section. The base plate mounting holes were drilled & tapped for #5-40 screws in the bottom of the "T" section. Base plates were cut from a piece of 1/8" x 1 1/4" aluminum flat bar. Edges were milled to 1 1/8". Holes were marked & drilled. Center holes are 82 degree CSK for #5-40 FH screws.

8966 - Drill holes in "T" section.
8968 - Drill 4 holes in "T" section.
18698 - "T" sections with 4 holes.
8970 - Base plates (1/8") - finish end.
8972 - Base plates (1/8") - finish long edge.
02973 - Base plates (1/8") cut to size.
8973 - Drill holes in base plate.
8978 - 82 degree CSK holes for #5-40 FH screws in base plate.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #53 on: July 18, 2019, 05:23:56 AM »
8980 - Drill hole for #5-40 screw in "T" section bottom.
8982 - Tap hole for #5-40 screw in "T" section bottom.
8984 - "T" section & base plate complete.
8986 - "T" section & base plate assembled.
8988 - Cylinder feet under block.

Offline vcutajar

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #54 on: July 18, 2019, 11:58:38 AM »
Quietly following along your progress Larry.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Vince

Offline scc

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #55 on: July 18, 2019, 08:10:49 PM »
Me too! :popcorn:            Terry

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #56 on: August 04, 2019, 03:23:59 AM »
OUTRIGGER BEARING PEDESTAL - A piece of scrap 1/2" aluminum was machined to 1" x 1 3/8". The side cut outs were chain drilled and milled 3/8" x 1 1/8" in successive steps using a 3/8" 2FL end mill. The 4 mounting holes were marked and drilled using a #29 (.136) drill.

1/2" scrap aluminum marked to be machined.
1/2" aluminum block machined to 1" x 1 3/8".
Side cut outs are chain drilled.
Cut outs machined to 3/8" x 1 1/8" in successive steps.
Cut outs complete.
Drilling 4 mounting holes.
Completed part.

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #57 on: September 10, 2019, 12:26:34 AM »
CRANKSHAFT BEARING - I just happened to have a piece of 1/2" x 1" brass bar stock. How often does that happen? I cut off 2 pieces and machined to size - 3/4". Layout crankshaft hole - drill & ream to .375. Layout bolt holes - drill #30 (.128) - CSK 5/16" x 1/8" deep using a 5/16" end mill. Mill a .188" wide x .125 deep step on each top corner using the 5/16" end mill in machine. Drill #60 (.040) oil hole in top center of bearing block (not on drawing).

9016 - Cut off 2 pieces of 1/2" x 1" brass bar stock and machine to 3/4".
9020 - Layout crankshaft hole & drill .368 with "U" drill .
9021 - Ream crankshaft hole to .375".
9023 - Layout 2 bolt holes & drill #30 (.128).
9025 - CSK 2 bolt holes with a 5/16" end mill x 1/8" deep.
9027 - Mill a .188" wide x .125" deep step on each top corner using the 5/16" end mill in machine.
125313531 - Drill a #60 (.040) oil hole in top center of bearing block (not on drawing).

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #58 on: September 10, 2019, 12:40:18 AM »
CRANKSHAFT BEARING (continued) - Turn a filing button and file top radius to .375". Polish to remove tarnish.

9032 - Turn a filing button from a piece of 3/4" diameter steel rod.
132521347 - File top radius to .375". I removed most of the excess stock using a narrow sanding belt and filed to finish.
9034 - Polish to remove tarnish - completed part.

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #59 on: September 10, 2019, 01:58:38 AM »
 :ThumbsUp: :popcorn:
 Looking good Larry! Keep those parts coming!

 John

Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #60 on: Today at 09:21:23 PM »
GUIDE and CRANKSHAFT SUPPORT - This assembly will be fabricated in 4 parts: (1) Crankshaft Support (2) Crosshead Guide Support (3) Base (4) Valve Lever Pivot. The Crankshaft Support is machined from a piece of scrap aluminum 1/2" (.511 actual) x 1 3/8 x 4.622. The drawing shows an end cut out with square corners. I used a 1/4" end mill and left the corners with a 1/8" radius. The center cut out was chain drilled and finished with a 1/2" end mill leaving a 1/4" radius at the 3 corners. Base of center section was machined to correct dimensions.

171851065 - Crankshaft Support - 1/2" (.511 actual) x 1 3/8" x 4.622" aluminum.
9044 - Machine end cut out with 1/4" end mill leaving corners with 1/8" radius.
9045 - Chain drill center cut out.
9047 - Mill cut out with 1/2" end mill leaving 1/4" radius at 3 corners.
165511579 - Center cut out almost complete.
9051 - Machine base to correct dimensions.


Offline Larry

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #61 on: Today at 09:53:46 PM »
CRANKSHAFT SUPPORT (continued) - Drill holes on top for bearing block. Thread one hole on top #5-40, 1/4" deep. Drill two .136 (#29) holes on left for connecting Crankshaft Support to Crosshead Guide Support. C'Bore 7/32" (.218) x .150 deep. These two holes are not shown on drawing.

163112676 - Drill 2 holes on top right for bearing block.
164348332 - Thread one hole on top #5-40 , 1/4" deep.
9056 -  Drill 2 mounting holes (.136) (#29 drill) on left for connecting crankshaft support to crosshead guide support. C'Bore 7/32" (.218) x .150 deep for #5-40 SH screws.
            These 2 holes are for assembly of parts and not shown on drawing.
132328185 - (Same as above.)

Online b.lindsey

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Re: MEM Corliss Attempt
« Reply #62 on: Today at 11:22:23 PM »
Guess I missed a couple of updates Larry. Things are really coming along well. This one is on my list for sometime.

Bill