Author Topic: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine  (Read 3193 times)

Offline bent

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2019, 05:59:33 PM »
Looks good so far, Tony.  Rest and heal up, the projects can wait.

Offline AOG

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2019, 08:47:09 PM »
It’s been quite a while since I posted in this thread. Between work and my still not completely healed back my time in the shop has been limited to an occasional 10 min here and 20 min there. I was looking at the pictures in my camera and I realized I had enough for a post or two so let’s get caught up. On my last post I had finished the piston and piston rod. Next up was the valve chest. A blank was cut and squared off. Then it was centered up in the four jaw and the hole for the gland drilled and tapped.



The end was then turned round.



To keep things concentric the part was flipped and the rounded end was placed in a collet chuck. The other end was turned round and domed over.



Then over to the mill where the corners of the cavity where drilled out.



The center was then milled out.



The mounting holes were put in by coordinate drilling using the DRO.



The valve chest was flipped on it’s side and the intake hole drilled and tapped.



At that point I realized that I hadn’t drilled out the end dome to support the valve rod so it was back into the lathe to complete that operation.



Here is the completed valve chest prior filing and clean up.



That’s it for now. I have enough pics for another post that I’ll put up once I get them organized.

Tony


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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2019, 01:38:00 PM »
Good to see some progress Tony. Hope the back continues to improve as well.

Bill

Offline AOG

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2019, 07:56:57 PM »
Thanks  Bill, here is the second part of my “let’s get caught up “ post. The next components made were the valve plate and valve chest cover. The blanks were squared up and clamped together. Then the mounting holes were coordinate drilled using the DRO.



Then the valve plate holes were drilled.



 Next up was the valve itself. The end of a piece of brass bar was squared up and the pocket was milled.



The part was flipped over and milled to size.



Then the slots for the valve nut and rod were milled.



The valve was completed by cutting it off of the parent stock and milling it to length. The next part was the valve rod. My lathe doesn’t have a good means of supporting the end of such a small part so the profile was turned and threaded in short sections to minimize bending.







Then it was over to the mill to put in the flats and drill the hole.



The valve rod was parted off and faced to length. The last piece in this update is the eccentric. The parent stock was chucked in the four jaw and faced off. Then the shaft hole was drilled and reamed.



The four jaw was offset and the eccentric turned.



Then over to the mill to drill and tap for the grub screw.



The eccentric was parted off and faced to length. I will conclude this update with a family shot of where we are with this project.



Till next time

Tony


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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2019, 12:23:00 AM »
Nice family shot Tony. Thanks again for the updates.

Bill

Offline bent

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2019, 04:49:29 PM »
Nice work Tony!

Offline AOG

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2019, 10:05:53 PM »
This weekend was one of those not a lot of pictures but plenty of work done weekends. I spent some time working on the outside gear. It’s one of those hard to hold in a vise parts and Elmer has strict requirements on the alignment of the holes to the gear profile. I have been working on learning fusion 360 so I decided to try out what I learned by designing a fixture to hold the gear in the correct position in the vise. This is what I came up with.



The fixture was designed to be a light interference fit to hold the gear. I printed the fixture and pressed the gear into it. The assembly was mounted in the mill and the holes drilled and tapped.



That’s when I found my mistake. Once the gear was pressed in, it didn’t want to come back out. I ended up having to mill a slot in the fixture deep enough to pry the gear loose. Next time I will add that to the design. I’ll end this with a closeup of the gear and fixture.



Till next time.

Tony


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Offline crueby

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2019, 10:09:39 PM »
Another option to the slot to pry it out - could drill holes through the fixture so you could push it out with rods). Either way, clever use of printing!

Offline bent

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #38 on: October 21, 2019, 05:38:35 PM »
That's a clever use of 3d printing.  Nice job Tony!

Offline AOG

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AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2019, 08:16:31 PM »
Thanks guys, I got the eccentric sheave done this weekend. I started by drilling and reaming the sheave.



Then I milled a slot in the sheave and parted it off.



I soldered a piece of brass bar to the sheave on my second attempt. (I overheated the first set of parts and melted them.)



I picked up the center of the sheave and drilled a hole for the pin.

Q

Elmer requires that the pin be drilled for a number 70 drill to take a retention wire. Number 60 is the smallest drill I own and I have had serious issues drilling tiny holes in tiny pins in the past. This time I drilled the parent stock while it was at full size. It made the task much easier.



Then I turned the pin to size and parted it off.



Here it is soldered into the assembly.



I still have a bunch of filing and clean up on the part yet to do but that’s it for now.

Till next time

Tony


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« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 08:26:00 PM by AOG »

Offline AOG

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2019, 08:22:07 PM »
This weekend I made the gear crank. First I cut a piece of brass bar to length and drilled the holes tapping the small one 5-40.



Next I locktited the gear to a mandrill and turned it to the correct profile.



While I was doing that, one of my 3D printers was printing out a set of fixtures for the next steps. I mounted the bar to the first fixture on the rotary table and milled the sides to dimension.



Then I rounded over the large end and milled the boss.



The part was mounted onto the second jig and the small end rounded over.



Here is the part right off the second jig and before cleanup.



After cleaning up the crank it was soldered to the gear with solder paste.



Here is the final part after cleanup.



That’s it for now, till next time.

Tony


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Offline awake

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2019, 11:08:59 PM »
Great work, Tony, and I love your use of 3d printed fixtures!

I am very much a newbie, learning greatly from everyone's builds. But I confess that I am still puzzled about this engine - at first I thought it was a 4-cycle IC engine, but now I think I am understanding that it is a steam engine - is that right? I was thinking the gearing was a fancy way to control the valve timing for a 4-cycle, but that wouldn't apply to a steam engine, right? So ... what purpose does the gearing serve?

Regardless, it is a fascinating engine, and I am learning much from your build!
Andy

Offline crueby

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #42 on: November 10, 2019, 11:33:32 PM »
Back in the steam engine days there were all sorts of geared mechanisms, lever arrangements, etc, to get around other makers patents. More recently, some have been done just to make them more interesting to see. Geared valving is one of the old ones to get around patents.

Offline AOG

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #43 on: November 10, 2019, 11:41:19 PM »
In this case the gear mechanism acts as a replacement for the crosshead. The piston rod moves in and out causing the spur gear to rotate around the inside gear which applies rotary motion to the crank. If you look at the first picture in the thread it makes more sense.

Tony

Offline awake

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Re: AOG’s version of Elmer’s number 5 geared engine
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2019, 03:27:47 PM »
Oh, I've been looking at that picture ... and I sorta get it, but not quite. :) I will continue to watch with interest!

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Andy