Author Topic: Atlas 7B shaper restoration  (Read 4257 times)

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« on: March 24, 2019, 12:51:46 AM »
Hello all.

It was suggested in my 6CI engine post that I post my shaper restoration here.  I was having trouble finding a sub in this forum where I thought it would fit, and felt like it would be white noise on other sites.  So, here we go.  Like many others, a while back, I started seeing some people using shapers, and became infatuated.  I finally found one at a price point that made sense, and the pictures will follow to help me tell the story.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2019, 12:56:50 AM »
Looking forward to following along.

Bill

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9314
  • Rochester NY
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2019, 12:59:50 AM »
Was looking at the pictures of it on the other thread - is it a model of a shaper, or just a small one?

Offline MJM460

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 931
  • Melbourne, Australia
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2019, 02:23:11 AM »
I am another glad that you are posting here and who will be following along.  Interested to learn more about shapers, but also interested in following the restoration techniques as I am sure many would be applicable to all sorts of machine restoration or even normal maintenance.

MJM460

The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2019, 03:04:44 AM »
Let me just start by saying you guys are all so awesome.  Also, I consider myself to be a very enthusiastic novice.  I learn from others, and then try it out.  The machine is not a model.  It is a "full size" Atlas 7B.  That being said, these are considered small shapers, and that is why they have become so popular.  A guy can fit this in his garage, and also have other tools.  The 7 refers to the length of travel of the ram.  More typical shapers would be maybe 16", and MUCH heavier.

Also, please feel free to let me know if you'd prefer to have more or less explanation, pictures, etc.  I'm putting this together the way it occurs to me, but my primary objective is putting something out there that others find useful and/or interesting.

With that, here goes.  On 10/11/18, I stopped by my local Fastenal to pick up this shaper I purchased from the East Coast. 


Doesn't it look cozy in the back of my little Subaru?!  It's a bit rusty, and as I found out, it was rusted immobile!


I removed the inspection plate to have a look inside, and see if I could get any motion out of the ram.  No such luck.  At this point I am buzzing with anticipation, and I can barely contain myself.  I just have to do SOMETHING to this machine right away!


Just look at all that beautiful filth.  Later I would decide there was a second paint job applied to the machine over the top of the original.  Here you can see the original color seemed to be a standard machine gray.


At this point, it is still my intention to just get this machine "cleaned up" and ready for operation which won't degrade bearings, etc.  Later, my ambitions would change drastically.


At this point, I've removed the tool post, clapper and swivel assembly, knee, feed and ratchet cover.  Those were relatively quick and easy.


Here you can see that the motor, and bracket has already been removed.  I decided to focus on getting the ram loose, and I would learn that this was much more involved than initially suspected.


In order to separate the ram, I learned that the ram block, lever, and link had to remain connected initially.  Here is that whole assembly removed.


Certainly many others will not be impressed, but I was happy when it didn't take me long to come up with this solution to not having any tool around intended for this part.  Naturally, it was important that the size of the hex keys was a fairly tight fit.  However, this part, and it's cousin on the other side both turned relatively easily, so that also made me very happy!


Here I'm using my longest bent flat blade screwdriver to persuade something internal.  This shot gives a decent idea of just how cramped is my workspace.


Here is that cousin part.  Due to the shaft sticking out, I had to make an adjustment.  If memory serves, I just used a wide blade screwdriver or something to get the twisting effect needed.





“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online pgp001

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 662
  • West Yorkshire - UK
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2019, 10:37:52 AM »
Nice find, I am sure you will not be disappointed when it is finished.

I went through the same exercise with mine a while ago, just be warned that finding an original vice will be a challenge.

Phil



Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2019, 12:42:35 PM »
That is a beauty.  I like how you did not paint the pot metal covers.  I may ask advice on how you finished those out.  I'm considering also not painting the aluminum belt guards, but we'll just have to see.

I've seen plenty of discussion on paint, and it seems the consensus on forums is alkyd enamel.  However, when I talked with somebody at Sherwin Williams, he has pretty much talked me into a standard oil base enamel.  The size of container necessary, and overall cost to get into alkyd enamel was a bit off the charts.

What did you choose for paint?  I can see that you do actually use your machine.

Oh, also, I've already seen what an insane price an original vice brings.  I'm not concerned about that.  I'm willing to simply use the one I purchased for use on my Burke milling machine.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2019, 01:48:49 PM »
Alright friends, I've uploaded a video to youtube for your entertainment.  I clearly didn't plan well, as it is not 16x9, but this was the day I brought home the shaper.  The pictures I had received were not great, so there was some mystery.  Also, if you can get through the video, you'll learn that I had a little different idea about the shaper when I first got it home.

Constructive criticism is welcome.  I've got other videos too, but they probably are all just as terrible as this one.  I'd like to put together a decent video of the assembly at least.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2019, 02:41:34 PM »

Along the way, I decided I would chase all the threads, and fortunately the old machine used all standard sizes, so I already had taps and dies the correct size.  Later I'll realize that citristrip found its way into those clean threads, and I'll have to redo some of the work, but I think I might do it the same way again.


At this point, I'm really just dipping my toes in the water, and I wanted to see how well the badges would clean up.  Not too bad, actually!


There's still some grime around the "rivets" there, but it's all coming off, so I'll finish the work later.  At least I can see how good it can look.


Most of the threads were in very good condition like the ones you see here.  The die was almost more of a pre-degreaser preparation step.  Look at all the crud jammed up in it.


I tend to obsess a bit.  Those who know me can get off the floor now at the understatement just made.  See how you can tell that the knee runner only ever used the one side of the base?  If you look at the operation of the machine, the knee slides from side to side as the ram cuts progress.  I've got a friend with a shop, and you see this same sort of thing there.  People who didn't buy the machine don't tend to worry about keeping things clean.  While I'm using this machine, it won't be so obvious if I don't really use the left side of the base!


Here, you get a view of some of the most challenging disassembly I experienced with this machine.  That large gear is the crank gear, and it connects through to the S7-58 shaft, and hub assembly.  First, the 6 enormous phillips screws holding plates to the crank gear are larger than the largest size driver I could find.  If memory serves, I believe it was a #4.  However, with patience, a rigid setup, and care, I was able to get them loose without bunging them up!

However, that wasn't all.  I also found challenge with removing the S7-83A shaft you see holding the much smaller gear in that picture.  Once I got the crank gear and the shaft removed, I struggled mightily with figuring out how to get the S7-58 shaft out of the hub, and removing the hub from the side of the frame.  Ultimately, it took a great deal of force, and I could find no way of pressing it through, so I had to rely on impact.  The result of this is that the small section of thread which you do not see from the outside of the machine is bent.  I still haven't decided whether I'll be able to heat, and straighten the existing part, or if I'll have to make a new one.


Here is a better look at the phillips screws.  Not only are they huge, but they were peened in place too.  With those plates out of the way, I feel I'll get this gear removed soon.


Here you can see me removing the block and pin from the crank gear assembly.  The position of this pin relative to the center of the crank gear is what determines the "throw" of the ram, or how far it will travel with each stroke.  Early into this process, it struck me just how much more complex of a machine a shaper is than a lathe. 


Four cap head screws later, and I'll be able to get this crank gear out of here.  You can see the bronze "nut" with the cylindrical protrusion flopped over.  The traveling of this "nut" on those threads is what slides the block and pin further from, or closer to the center of the crank gear, thus adjusting the throw of the ram.


There, the gear is removed, and I'm left with the S7-13A hub with bearing cone, and S7-58 shaft.  It should be a simple matter of removing that little helical gear from the end of the shaft, and everything will just cooperate, right?!

Absolutely not!  Here is where I employed every four letter word I have ever practiced over my considerable years of experience, and also some mechanical efforts.  Nothing was working.  It took me quite a while, some penetrating oil, and a whole lot of visual inspection, and internet research before I started getting a bit heavy handed with the process.

One thing is that these little helical gears (of which there are several on the machine) do not like being removed from their shafts.  However, this one was especially stubborn.  Here is where I also learned how unreasonable people can get when others ask online about how to disassemble even a particular aspect of these machines.  From my world, when learning Linux, it was akin to "RTFM!!"  Since there are exploded diagrams out there, you should apparently never ask anybody how to disassemble any part of the machine.  Well, the exploded diagram doesn't tell everything.


Here is that stubborn little shaft, and you can see some varnish? on it.  It was good and stuck.  If you look closely, you'll also notice that short section of threads at the top are bent.  I don't think the part would be difficult to turn, but threads are still a bit of a challenge for me.  I don't have very many of my change gears, and I tend to have all the wrong sized taps and dies most of the time.  These are very fine threads.  We'll see!


If memory serves, I believe it took me quite a while to decide this "collar" is actually threaded.  I think it may have been somewhat challenging.  However, relatively speaking, no biggie at this point in the game!


Oh happy day!  :cartwheel: :cartwheel: :cartwheel:
After removing the collar and gear in the previous picture, the hub assembly was able to be gently persuaded to leave its home!


As usual, I took the time to see that all the threads were going to be in good shape when assembly day came later on.  Other than a few missing screws, and a couple of screws broken off in the machine, I was very fortunate with all the screws being in relatively good shape.


Here we have the flange assembly finally being removed from the frame.  This relatively short period of time was so transformative to my mindset about the project.  I had really been struggling a while there.

This picture also presents a wonderful opportunity to illustrate another issue with the machine.  It came with no switch, switch cover, nor wiring.  I'll have to come up with that stuff myself.  I believe I can get a decent home made switch cover, and surely I can find an appropriate looking, and sized switch.  Wiring is no big deal.  That may even actually be fun!

« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 02:52:58 PM by vdubjunkie »
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2019, 02:57:01 PM »
Well this phase of the restoration is certainly moving along rapidly!! Thanks for posting the progress and all the pictures.

Bill

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2019, 12:30:09 PM »
Alright all, this is going to be a bit out of order, but I just got in my maroon scotchbrite wheel the other day, and had a few minutes to see some results last night.



This is a wheel with nothing more than having been removed from the machine, and degreased.



Here is that same wheel with just a quick pass against the wheel.  I am so impressed with these results.



Here are some other items, with a untouched bolt for reference.  That little handle leaves me wondering if it may just have a coat on it, so I didn't leave it against the wheel very long.  I'll worry about that later.  Check out that grease cup!  Soon I'll be posting an image of what it looked like straight off the machine.  It wasn't horrible, but this is a marked improvement!

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2019, 12:40:30 PM »
That really made a huge difference...those look great now!!

Bill

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2019, 04:24:52 AM »
Stepping back in time again, I've got most of the major items dismantled, and it's time to start breaking down everything into even smaller pieces!



I made sure to get a picture of all the parts together so that later I would have an easier time identifying which parts go with which other parts.  There are actually a LOT of little parts, and there are some that are very similar, but slightly different sizes.  This is the disc and gear, and it was fairly well locked up with grime.  It went directly into a degreaser bath.



Here is all of that hardware after degreasing.  Just today I pulled out each of these parts and buffed them on the scotchbrite wheel.  They had a bit of rust here and there, and looked much worse than this picture depicts.  I am so over the moon about the results of the scrotchbrite wheel.   :atcomputer:



Just look at all that grime and peeling paint.  I can clearly remember this moment.  I started giving some real thought to a "full restoration."



As I started to realize just how much effort there was going to be in getting this machine apart enough to do a proper "clean up" I knew I would never want to do it again.  So, I was either going to do the restoration now, or never.



The shaft on the runner was so completely locked into the knee, I literally wound up having to use this arm puller to get it out. 



I knew if I didn't take the oiler out of the stud in the ram right away, it would be broken soon enough.



Here, I was finally able to remove the block, ram lever, and link from the ram.  All together, that thing was unwieldy.



This assembly up in the ram would wind up being one of the very most difficult things to disassemble.  Hopefully my pictures are good enough that I can put some words together later to describe what it took.  This had some sort of split pin holding the gear on the shaft.  That part wasn't too bad.  It's the gear under this one that was so darned challenging.   :thinking:



I don't believe it was difficult to notice, but here is a grub screw that holds the ram lever to the link.  That wasn't shown in the "Parts List Catalog" exploded diagram I have.



Regardless of the color on that pin, it's actually pretty smooth.  It will clean up quite nicely.



Of course, there's a grub screw at this end of the ram lever too.



This grub screw was obvious enough.  This is the other side of that gear inside the ram I mentioned earlier.  It seems like this would just be simple, right?  I made all sorts of effort to thread off the collar from the shaft, and when that failed miserably, I made slowly increasing efforts to force it out with dead blow force.  Ultimately it did come out with dead blow force, but I was very concerned about jacking up threads, so that took quite a while.   :wallbang: :hammerbash:





« Last Edit: March 30, 2019, 02:09:55 PM by vdubjunkie »
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2019, 03:49:42 PM »
Moving on, there are plenty more items to tear down further!  So, sit back and enjoy
:popcorn: :old: :ROFL: :old: :popcorn:



In my exploded diagram, this is simply labeled as a shaft, some bearings, collars, gear, etc.  I'll call it the main drive shaft assembly.

I decided to leave it as an assembly, as I did not really see a benefit to taking it apart, but I did see plenty of possible detractions.



Here we are after a nice degreaser bath.  It's already looking a whole lot better, but there will be further efforts as I continue on.

Despite the overall immobile nature of the machine, I found that most parts were not terribly worn, etc.  However, this drive gear is an exception to that.  There were some reasonable burrs thrown up on each tooth.  So, I will address those before reassembly.



One could easily argue that this is an image not worth sharing, but I did anyway. :atcomputer:

This is how I intend to be able to ensure that I don't wind up thinking "Now, where did this go?" :thinking: during reassembly!

It's also a pretty nice close-up of the rust/paint nastiness combo present on the machine.  Just looking back at these now, I get even more excited at how wonderful each of the stripped parts look today. :LittleAngel:



As I work with more machines, learn more about the machining process, and work toward some casting efforts, a part with some shape like this really stands out to me.  I see so much beauty in it.  I find it to be elegant.  Look at those embossed letters.  Later I will put a fair bit of effort into removing extra casting slag, and gunk from around those letters to they pop as well as possible once repainted.



Let's have a nice look at that nasty base.  There's really nothing wrong with the base, but it looks pretty unsavory, simply because so much nastiness fell there over the years, and maybe nobody ever thought about cleaning the machine.



Here are a few more items pulled from the degreaser bath.  If I had just been "cleaning up" the machine, I would have been quite happy with each of these parts at this stage.



This is the cross rail with lift nut freshly removed.



These old kitty litter tubs make excellent degreaser baths for many of the parts.



Here is the magic.  :zap:  Just look at that foam.  It was interesting seeing how quickly the bubbles discolored blackish.



For the panel, I was able to simply use a punch from the back side of the panel.  This won't be the case on the other badges.



Degreasing large items is so very different than smaller hardware, especially threads.  This was a very time consuming, and somewhat tedious task.  :stickpoke:



This is another example of something there is no way I would be able to figure out later.  In fact, the exploded diagram has NO MENTION of this grub screw.  Also, that lock washer is unlike any other on the machine.



These parts are post degreaser bath, and pre paint removal.  No kidding.  I haven't even broken out the citristrip yet!  :LickLips:



I've laid out all of the motor and belt drive, and engaging mechanisms with their associated pins, and grub screws in position for later referral, as I assemble everything.



I've never before seen bearings like this.  Look at that felt washer.  There is no way I would have put this back together properly without this image.  My "extra parts" bin would be full indeed!  :lolb:


At this point, I've taken you all with me on a journey up to the point of paint removal.  Overall, I feel like everything I've done up to this point has a relatively good process.  The paint removal though, I could certainly improve that.  There are so many variables involved.  I'm in though.  I'm already thinking about what machine I can restore next.  Anybody got something they want to donate?!  :ROFL:

Until next time, keep having fun, and get in that shop!



“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2019, 08:38:30 PM »
If the Purple Power doesn't get it done.   Try Simple Green mixed 50/50 with hot water.....that'll take paint and grease off...bare metal

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2019, 08:45:59 PM »
If the Purple Power doesn't get it done.   Try Simple Green mixed 50/50 with hot water.....that'll take paint and grease off...bare metal

Dave

Thanks for that tip.  I've heard others talk about simple green, but haven't used it myself.  The purple power did a fantastic job of grease removal, and quite a bit of the looser paint.  At this time, I'm not a huge fan of what it takes to deal with citrisrip.  It's very nasty stuff after mixed with all the paint it removed.  I wouldn't mind seeing how the simple green works.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2019, 09:17:28 PM »
Go through this thread and you'll find plenty of before and afters.

occasionally, they needed a little scrubbing with a scrub brush, but it worked WAY better than the citristrip.

Dave

http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,369.msg35642.html#msg35642
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2019, 10:14:38 PM »
Glad to see you doing a full restoration on this nice machine. Lots of work for sure, but just keep thinking about how nice it will be after the restoration.

Bill

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2019, 10:36:57 PM »
Check out post 92 and especially 93 on my rebuild thread

That's how they clean up, and once they're dry, I can paint.    3 coats of rustoleum, and no primer required.

has held up very nicely

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2019, 02:59:51 PM »
Dave,

I just skimmed through your entire thread (skim = look at all pics, and occasionally read too), and I've got to say that it was quite humbling.  That is one nice machine. 

With that said, I am still happy that I'm choosing my particular level of restoration.  To begin with, I'm not so sure this machine would even see a substantial benefit from it.  While I don't really see any original scraping marks, I don't really think it was ever used that much.  I think it was used occasionally, and left dirty all the time.

I must say, though, that it is so cool seeing the different ways people go about doing a restoration.  That was very inspiring.  I really would enjoy doing a more complete either 10" or 13" South Bend.

The other day I FINALLY found a really good option in a city not that far from me.  Whenever I'm looking around, I never see anything anywhere near me.  Of course, it is moot, as I couldn't even begin to hope to spend a chunk of change like that.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2019, 03:06:27 PM »
It was a labor or Love I can assure you...and it's satisfying to be able to use it in anger, and get great results.

I agree...the 7" shapers probably didn't get used that much.   Clean her up and paint her and spend some time putting her back together right, and pay attention and repair anything that's worn, and I'm sure you'll be fine.

I'm following along.....

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2019, 03:09:14 PM »
treat the Zymak parts carefully.    I don't know how that material is affected by the more aggressive cleaners.


Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2019, 04:31:08 PM »
treat the Zymak parts carefully.    I don't know how that material is affected by the more aggressive cleaners.


Dave

Dave,

You've introduced me to something new.  You aren't talking about this are you?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zamak

I've had a few parts, that, by touch, seemed to be a bit less substantial.  I've just generically been referring to things as pot metal, or thinking some things have been coated.  One of the ball crank handles is definitely coated, and I'll have to do some thinking on what to do about it, because it was jacked up before I touched it.

So far, my instincts have done alright.  I haven't taken anything out of purple power baths, or citristrip, and thought "oh god, what have I done?!"  I'll definitely be asking some advice soon.  I'm also taking a break from my steam engine build to let the frustration dissipate.  When I get back to it, I may be calling on you specifically!

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2019, 04:41:51 PM »
treat the Zymak parts carefully.    I don't know how that material is affected by the more aggressive cleaners.


Dave

Dave,

You've introduced me to something new.  You aren't talking about this are you?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zamak

I've had a few parts, that, by touch, seemed to be a bit less substantial.  I've just generically been referring to things as pot metal, or thinking some things have been coated.  One of the ball crank handles is definitely coated, and I'll have to do some thinking on what to do about it, because it was jacked up before I touched it.

So far, my instincts have done alright.  I haven't taken anything out of purple power baths, or citristrip, and thought "oh god, what have I done?!"  I'll definitely be asking some advice soon.  I'm also taking a break from my steam engine build to let the frustration dissipate.  When I get back to it, I may be calling on you specifically!

Yes that is what I was talking about.    I don't know how it will react to the "dip"   so proceed with caution on those parts....It may be absolutely fine, but I would "walk into that slowly"

Typical Atlas parts like handles were Zymak + chrome plated.

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Online Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2019, 04:52:59 PM »
Enjoying the progress on your shaper.

I have an AMMCO 7" shaper that I have been working on, fortunately mine is in very nice original condition and only needed to be cleaned and adjusted. I'm looking forward to being able to put it to use.


Dave

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10423
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2019, 04:56:26 PM »
Enjoying the progress on your shaper.

I have an AMMCO 7" shaper that I have been working on, fortunately mine is in very nice original condition and only needed to be cleaned and adjusted. I'm looking forward to being able to put it to use.


Dave

I had an Ammco 7,  it was the most accurate machine in the shop for a long time!...Then...The F1 fell in my lap, and it had to go, so I sold it....I liked that machine!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2019, 10:51:57 PM »
Enjoying the progress on your shaper.

I have an AMMCO 7" shaper that I have been working on, fortunately mine is in very nice original condition and only needed to be cleaned and adjusted. I'm looking forward to being able to put it to use.


Dave

Thanks Dave.  I'm really enjoying the process.  Honestly, the Atlas was at the bottom of my list.  I would have rather had an AAMCO or South Bend.  I even found one I hadn't ever heard of, and was trying to make the deal happen when the jerk just went silent on me.  It was a really neat looking machine. 

That is a very nice looking machine you've got there.  I'm really looking forward to putting this little thing to use.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2019, 12:42:59 AM »
The Atlas appears to be a well built machine.

The AMMCO doesn't have tee slots and also a very small table; I do have the original vise which has 4" jaws. I recently made a fixture plate that mounts to the table and is keyed for alignment.
I'm hoping that this will give me some more options when it comes to fixturing parts.

Dave

Online Steamer5

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1140
  • The "Naki" New Zealand
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2019, 12:06:10 PM »
Hi,
Following along. My Dad has a 7" Ammco...pretty sure....so one day it will be in my shop.

Dave ,
 That sure is pretty! It doesn't look like it has worked hard in its life

I got a club newsletter yesterday from one of the other clubs here in NZ & it had a picture of one of the guys cutting an internal spline using his shaper. He had welded up plate with side plates that bolted to the table, on to this he had mounted his dividing head inline with the tool. The resultant splines looked very good.

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2019, 04:54:42 AM »
Of course, it always comes down to what a particular person actually does, but I can't help but want to compare the price of a small shaper with a full set of broaches.  You don't really need a set of broaches if you have a shaper.  Never mind all the other things you either can't do with a mill, or the shaper simply does better.  :facepalm:

You hear a lot of people complaining about how you can't make any money with a shaper, but heck, this is a hobby for me.  I don't plan on ever being able to make any money anyway.    :Jester:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #30 on: April 10, 2019, 08:58:27 AM »
Here is where I started to get serious, breaking out the strong stuff!



The frame is all ready for the heavy chemical treatment :stir:, and even as I see that bottle of citristrip, I can't help but wonder if I could have saved myself a fair bit of nastiness with Simple Green.  I'm going to have to try that soon! :naughty:

Also, yes, that is Julian in the background either firing, or getting ready to fire a gun.  Trailer Park Boys has become my background while working on this restoration!   :cheers:



Maybe an unnecessary pic, but there will be little question which type, and length of screw went into this particular hole.

You can see the citristrip did a pretty darned good job of getting a vast majority of all paint/primer off the surface.  There will certainly be more finishing work to do before it's ready for paint, but compared to not using the stripper, I'm quite pleased!   :pinkelephant:



That is quite a lot of grime removal, and if I weren't refinishing the machine, I would have been quite happy with what the purple power did here.



Here's a decent little array of degreased parts all laid out.  I was very happy with the way they looked at this point.  Wait until you see how good they look after the next phase!   :LickLips:



After attacking most of the larger pieces, I started finding some of these brackets, and such.  There wound up being more than I had mentally prepared myself for, and I thought I was going in well prepared!  Oh well, maybe next time I'll get it right.   :embarassed:



This picture leaves you feeling like there would be very little room for improvement at this point.  I know I felt that way initially.  However, my OCD was let off the leash with these parts.   :Lol: :LittleDevil:

After the citristrip did most of the heavy lifting, I used one of those "Gator" wheels on my drill to take it down to super bare metal.  Where I couldn't get with that wheel, I wound up using rotary stones.



While the citristrip did a very good job all around, the aluminum belt guards wound up needing considerably more post strip attention than the iron, and steel.

I'm not sure if that could have been something to do with my setup for covering them while the orange goo did its thing, or if that is just what to expect on aluminum.   :shrug:



One can only expect so much from simply setting parts in purple power.  It was no surprise to me that the bearings needed extra attention.

Rather than press off the bearings, I decided I could do just as thorough a job with my pick set, and a tooth brush.  Looking back, I would do it this way again.



Remember earlier when I mentioned that I would eventually get out this gear?  Well, this doesn't illustrate the happy dance I did just before taking the picture.   :cartwheel:



I learned a cool trick when watching a basementshop guy video where he collaborated with another guy who was into restoring machines.

It worked one of two times here to cut in a slot so I could use a flat bladed screwdriver to remove the pin.  If you get in really close, you'll see that the pin has a spiral flute or "thread" on it.

I put a great deal of effort into cautiously getting this slot created, and even such, I slipped a couple of times.  The other one I wound up having to literally grind away the entire head.  Believe it or not, I actually got that one done with no mishap.

Since neither of these are through holes, I'll wind up needing to drill out the remainder of this shaft.



Here's a nice portrait of the interim on two of the larger pieces.  I still haven't gone all gangsta' OCD on them yet though!   :Jester:



I have a seemingly unlimited supply of interim pics I could share, but I don't see any of the rest of them providing anything "new" to the thread, so here is a picture of the ram that I think I took after I decided I was done with paint prep work.



I know that this is nothing more than a bracket, but I couldn't stop myself from trying to make the back of it fairly smooth and deliberate looking.  There was a fair bit of extraneous casting here before I gave it the business.   :zap:


I believe that is about all for now.  I've got a few pics "on the roll" I'll try to post soon.  I'm very close to applying some paint right now!

Thanks for following along, and I hope some of this might prove useful, or at least interesting to others.

Feel free to ask any questions, or ridicule me without mercy!

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline cnr6400

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 394
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2019, 09:42:10 AM »
If you are shopping for new pins to hold the round name plate, google "type U drive screws". That is their name in industry.

Great job on the resto so far!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Online Steamer5

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1140
  • The "Naki" New Zealand
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2019, 09:47:42 AM »
Coming along very nicely!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2019, 01:04:23 PM »
Nice job on getting it down to bare metal. Should make the painting much easier and look better in the end too.

Bill

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2019, 12:43:23 PM »
If you are shopping for new pins to hold the round name plate, google "type U drive screws". That is their name in industry.

Great job on the resto so far!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Wow.  I didn't even have to ask yet, and I've already been assisted in finding the "type U drive screws" I'll be needing!   It was somewhere in the back of my mind to figure that out. :cheers:

Thanks everybody for the kind words.  It's been a long time since I've tried to paint anything but a wall, so this next part should be quite interesting.   :noidea:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2019, 03:13:25 PM »
Wondering if powder coating might be a good alternative for this application?  Any powder coaters nearby you could check with? Or there is the option of doing it yourself though it might take a "big-ish" curing oven. Just thinking it might be more durable over time.

Bill

Offline Admiral_dk

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1498
  • Søften - Denmark
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2019, 05:04:08 PM »
With powder coating you need a clean surface (same as normal paint), a dust free area, that will get big amounts of powder - I have used an empty cardboard box so far - a metal hanger connected to the gun + you should be able to use the same hanger to carry it into the oven and hang it there during curing. ABSOLUTELY no touching before it is out of the oven and cool again !!!!

Any holes that should be kept clear, are plugged with silicone plugs - can be bought on eBay.
Some engine parts are only painted on the outside - so they can lay on a "shelf" that goes into the oven so to speak. But here it is probably better to have a kind of paper or plastic between the part and the shelf wile applying the powder, slide it of the shelf in such a way that you can get it onto a clean shelf - perhaps with support so that the coat does not stick to the shelf ….

There are probably more to say, but my bad memory …..

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2019, 03:25:43 AM »
Wow guys.  Powder coating.  I hadn't even thought of that.  Unfortunately, I don't see it happening for this project, if for no other reason than I've already spent money on the paint!  You do have me thinking though.

Ever since I first started buying VW Trends magazines as a kid, I was fascinated by the idea of powder coating car parts.  I don't know why it never occurred to me to apply it elsewhere.

With any luck, I'll be painting this weekend!   :whoohoo:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #38 on: April 13, 2019, 11:05:37 PM »
What a momentous occasion.  Today is a day of firsts.  Not only am I posting same day pics of my progress, but I've also delved into a fairly proper job of painting!   :cartwheel:

Being that this has been my first foray with "proper" painting, I was quite happy with the results thus far.

The paint is a "direct to metal" alkyd enamel.  I did a fair bit of research, and the overwhelming census was that an alkyd enamel is the most appropriate paint to be using for such an application.

However, I began looking for paint locally at Sherwin Williams, and I was quickly talked down.  My only alkyd enamel option required a minimum of 1 gallon, when I only needed a quart, and I was only presented with the single option of primer + paint.

I include this only in the hopes that it might help others.  Youtube user "BasementShopGuy" aka Brad was kind enough to offer a paint code for some Benjamin Moore DTM (direct to metal) paint, which I could purchase in a quart size.  Well, everything worked out here.

Then..  b.lindsey had to come along and suggest powder coating!   :hammerbash:

All kidding aside, I'm now infected with this notion of finding a place to try some powder coating.  Since I had already purchased paint, and worked myself into relative preparedness for painting, I decided to forge ahead!



I love these sawhorses, but I'll try not to run down a tangent.  I had a sheet of MDF, and some trash bags, and this was how my adventure began.



I began preparing the metal using acetone on mechanics shop towels.  However, it didn't take me long to realize this was leaving bits of towel behind, and possibly compromising the quality of the paint job.



The ram was apparently my first application, and I felt like it went really well.



While the overall finishing of some of these machines was less than perfect, the efforts made to create a beautiful form, while also being functional is all but lost in more modern machines.  Even as I recognize the benefits in having a bunch of squared off forms for full diversity of use, I can't help but appreciate the beauty of these older machines.

A shaper is such a wonderfully hypnotic device to behold in action, and the ram is the obvious focus of attention.  It matters that the ram is made to be beautiful.



By this time, I was feeling fairly confident in my procedure.  I enjoy seeing the contrast between the freshly painted, and unfinished, prepared metal.  As I review the images of the machine as I received it, I keep imagining side by side comparisons of the parts and assemblies.



With the frame, I had some concerns about the paint around the brass bushings on each side at the base.  I used the hanger (S7-21A) to prop up each side, while I detailed the bottom several inches of paint.

Since I hadn't yet put paint near the top, I was able to move the hanger from one side to the other without incident, rocking the frame gently to achieve the necessary orientation.

The one issue I did run into here was that the paint was a bit too tacky on the one side by the time I worked myself back round to it.  In the future, if I suspect it will be several minutes before I return to an area, I'll want to go back and at least fill in a little bit.

This is definitely very new to me.  However, despite this little issue, I still feel the overall result was good.  Also, being my first coat, I can still resolve any major concerns before the product is complete.



The front of the frame will generally be obscured by the knee, and cross rail.  However, it is still worth putting all the effort into it as I will the rest of the machine. 



The flange was the first quick part, and it is such a unique shape.  With all of the unpainted sections, I'm really looking forward to the time where I remove the tape, and see the completed work.   :smokin2:



The cross rail is another fun part with plenty of curves, and shapes.  Ok, so maybe most of the parts have something interesting about them.  I guess I'm just enjoying the experience of figuring out how to deal with each unique piece.



The cover is especially fun due to the embossed "Atlas" font.  I spent a fair bit of time preparing the letters, and surrounding areas.  This will certainly be an exciting detail for the machine as it gets reassembled.



Here it is after a bit of drying time.  I think the paint has setled a bit, and maybe fewer obvious brush marks.



Ok, I'll spare you a run down on each and every part I painted.  Here is a final picture from the day's efforts.

However, even as I was typing this, my wife got home with my daughter from a little shopping, and rain made its way down onto some of the pieces to the far outside.

So, I spent a few minutes with a hair dryer on medium heat, high fan, getting all of the water off.  It did not seem to affect the paint from what I can tell.

Tomorrow, I'll have a better idea how my efforts came together.

I believe I'll apply a second coat, and be able to get a really good look Monday evening.  They say 24 hours dry time.  I'm not certain about full cure.

Now I have to watch "The Book Thief" again with my girls.  I don't think I'll ever get tired of that movie.   :popcorn:

« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 11:13:04 PM by vdubjunkie »
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9314
  • Rochester NY
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #39 on: April 13, 2019, 11:41:28 PM »
Looks great!   :ThumbsUp:


Do you think that paint would go on thin enough for smaller model parts?

Offline cnr6400

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 394
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #40 on: April 14, 2019, 12:21:25 AM »
Great paint job! it will look terrific when assembled.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:  :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Do be patient  :smokin2:  :smokin2:  :smokin2:  and let the paint FULLY dry before handling it. It takes a while especially if weather has been wet as you mentioned. I'd leave it a week (seriously, a week at least) otherwise you may get the dreaded fingerprint. Don't ask me how I know.  :old: :shrug:

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #41 on: April 14, 2019, 12:58:19 AM »
Looks great!   :ThumbsUp:


Do you think that paint would go on thin enough for smaller model parts?

I do believe this paint would need to be thinned to work well on smaller model parts.  I know very little about painting, but based on things I've read, and my experience with it today, I think thinning would certainly be in order.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #42 on: April 14, 2019, 01:00:41 AM »
Great paint job! it will look terrific when assembled.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:  :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Do be patient  :smokin2:  :smokin2:  :smokin2:  and let the paint FULLY dry before handling it. It takes a while especially if weather has been wet as you mentioned. I'd leave it a week (seriously, a week at least) otherwise you may get the dreaded fingerprint. Don't ask me how I know.  :old: :shrug:

Thank you very much for the kind words.  I'm hoping it will all show well in the end.  I just had to rescue the parts from rain dripping from my garage door again.  I decided to very carefully relocate the parts on the end, which are prone to being dripped on.

Are you suggesting a week in between coats?  I've developed the patience for that, I'm just wondering.  I'm about 9 hours into "drying" now, and I can tell it is still tacky, so it wouldn't surprise me!   :old:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #43 on: April 14, 2019, 01:41:01 AM »
Wow everything looks great!
Nice work.


Dave

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #44 on: April 14, 2019, 01:43:14 PM »
Wonderful job so far. It's going to look great when done!!

Bill

Offline cnr6400

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 394
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2019, 02:34:02 PM »
Most paints I've used you can do another coat when tacky, but after last coat wait at least a week before handling it, would be my suggestions. :cheers:

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2019, 05:42:29 PM »
Seriously everybody, thank you all so much for the kind words, encouragement, and insight.   :cheers:

Beyond just the fact that it helps encourage me to keep going, and feeling like I'm not making any major mistakes, it also makes it easier to not take shortcuts along the way that I might otherwise.  I'll be sharing everything with you guys!   :LittleAngel:

I am getting a little bummed though.  With the length of time I'll have to allow these parts to sit, I don't think I should be doing any kind of metal removal out there until I'm all done!   :hammerbash:  I only have about 4 other projects right now I could be working on.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2019, 05:53:14 PM »
Simple solution, move the painted parts into the house to finish curing; then continue working on the other pieces.  :lolb:

Dave

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #48 on: April 14, 2019, 09:43:14 PM »
Simple solution, move the painted parts into the house to finish curing; then continue working on the other pieces.  :lolb:

Dave

Now that is funny.  It's made even funnier when you know that I am married!   :lolb:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline wlburton

  • Jr. member
  • **
  • Posts: 1
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2019, 10:49:51 PM »
Have you made any more progress with the shaper?  I bought one (a 7B) at an estate sale a couple of weeks ago and am in the process of giving it a much needed cleaning.  I'm also stripping three layers of paint off of it and repainting it a very similar color to yours (which seems to have been the original color of this shaper).  I didn't remove the two main shafts since they seem to be fine and I'm working around them as I clean and paint.  I enjoyed your account of your restoration and it's been helpful.  I don't think these things were ever designed to be taken apart!  The photo was taken at the estate sale.

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #50 on: November 30, 2019, 02:27:47 AM »
Oh man, you got the vise and the stand too.  Nice find!   :cheers:
I'm so glad to hear that it was helpful.  I'd be really curious to hear others accounts of there something was different than mine.

Sorry for the huge delay, but life kept happening.  I've finally been able to get some time in the garage recently and I'm dry fitting everything.  I'll try to get some more pics up shortly!
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #51 on: December 01, 2019, 05:10:27 AM »
Hey again everyone.  Yes, it's basically been seven months since I was doing anything meaningful in the garage with a project.
Within the past few weeks, I've been able to begin doing some dry fitting of components and applying final paint where desired.



The dry fit accomplishes several things.  Obviously, you get a chance to make sure you have all your parts.  Ensuring that everything fits is implied by the name and also quite important.  A deeper reality to fit is that you find things like huge threads with no tap which still need a good cleaning and other such similar things.



I'm already loving the look of the unpainted feed ratchet housing and guard.  I haven't yet decided whether I'll actually polish it.  Right now I'm thinking that's a bit too much bling!   :shrug:
Maybe you noticed the missing bolt in the flange.  I was certain I had all the big bolts, but I'm just not finding it at this moment.   :facepalm:



Nothing too special here other than I think it's visually stunning.  I've got PLENTY to learn about paint and I honestly don't know what I should expect from a brush, but I thought it turned out quite well overall.



Here was one of my earlier surprises of missing hardware.  Looking back through my pictures, I can see that I was missing one of the grub screws, but I did have three nuts.  I'll have to figure out where I've put those.   :noidea:



The S7-83A shaft protruding from the side of the frame here has excellent movement.  Since I found no need to try to press off bearings, collars, nor gear, I did have a pretty good shot.  Those huge threads I mentioned earlier, these were what I was thinking of.  When I first tried to start the collar threads, I quickly realized cleaning of the female threads would be absolutely necessary.  More so, I had a hard time imagining how the collar was ever able to occupy that space before.   :hellno:



Here we are with the cross rail and lift screw attached, as well as the S7-68A disc and gear, with rods and bushings.



Now, with the table installed and the ratchet assembly connected, I'm able to test the vertical and  horizontal movement of the table.  Everything is quite smooth.   :cartwheel:



Other than some final fit and finish stuff and some missing hardware, this is one of the few remaining more involved issues.  I don't know why this surface is so badly galled, but I'm currently in the process of making some aluminum soft jaws for the South Bend so I can clean it up.
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Offline vdubjunkie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 82
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #52 on: December 08, 2019, 05:37:37 PM »
Well everybody, it's time for me to consider other's opinions.  The Tool Post Clapper and Swivel Assembly (S7-8AX) was missing one of the 1/4-28 dog-point set screws.  While looking for a replacement (no surprise), I've found it is much easier to find socket, or female hex type screws.

I think it is fair to say that these are an improvement over traditional slotted style.  However, as infrequently as one should have to adjust the gib, if you take the time to do things properly, you should be able to avoid chewing up a slotted screw.

I guess my question is whether anybody feels strongly one way or the other, but also whether anybody knows where in the heck I could find slotted dog-point headless set screws.  If need be, I'm sure I could take it as an opportunity to "make" my own by just cutting the head off a longer screw and turning a dog-point into the tip.

Oh, also, I did find a pretty decent option for the switch replacement.  I'm sure some would argue that I should just mount a big ugly box to the outside of the machine as so many others have done, since accessing this switch late will be problematic.  However, I just cannot bring myself to do that intentionally, when I have the opportunity to make it look right.

https://www.grainger.com/product/CARLING-TECHNOLOGIES-Toggle-Switch-2X464?internalSearchTerm=Toggle+Switch%2C+Number+of+Connections%3A+2%2C+Switch+Function%3A+On%2FOff&suggestConfigId=8&searchBar=true

If anybody knows of a better place to find a switch that looks even closer to original, I'll graciously accept that information.  I believe the original switches had a fairly fat pole with a bit of a ball at the end.
“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Online Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Atlas 7B shaper restoration
« Reply #53 on: December 08, 2019, 08:37:30 PM »
Not sure where you live, but Ace Hardware here in Boise ID has a selection of slotted set screws. Not sure about the 1/4-28 though.

Dave