Author Topic: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine  (Read 6811 times)

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2019, 02:14:33 AM »
Why go to all the work of making the counter weights and then drill them full of lightening holes?

Dave

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2019, 07:07:42 AM »
And on a similar note having the two "straps" come past the main crankshaft axis will further counter the effect of the counterweights. If you stick with copying the centaur design then all the added weight is on the side of the shaft where you actually want it.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #32 on: March 25, 2019, 01:27:46 PM »
Dave auto--More for "pretty" than for functionality.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #33 on: March 25, 2019, 05:49:18 PM »
Here we have the first video related to this engine, showing the action of my $12 helical gears from China. I am very pleased with the action, and more than pleased with the price. The gears are made in China and sold thru Ebay. They are metric "modulus" gears rather than diametral pitch gears, but that means very little to me as they only have to mesh with each other.

Offline crueby

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #34 on: March 25, 2019, 06:40:49 PM »
Those gears work great!

The module vs DP spec is just two different ways of measuring the same thing, sort of like than inches vs millimeters. Simple to convert from one to the other:
Module = 25.4 / DP
and

DP= Module / 25.4

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #35 on: March 25, 2019, 10:36:45 PM »
The camshaft housing has a 1" long oilite bronze bushing in each end. The shaft is 3/8" diameter, the hole inside the square piece is 1/2" diameter. There is an oil hole to squirt a bit of oil into the cavity to keep the oilite bushings lubricated. I finally had to break down and spend some money today--beyond the cost of the $12 helical gears. I was right out of 2" diameter cast iron to make the cylinder from, so I bought a 12" length today at my local metal suppliers for $45.00. I only need about 1/3 of the length I bought for this engine, but I'm sure there will be more engines in future.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #36 on: March 26, 2019, 05:20:48 PM »
Oh Yeah---we got cast iron cylinder!!!!

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2019, 11:15:21 PM »
I had a piece of 1144 stressproof long enough to make a crankshaft from. Since you can only buy this stuff in rounds, I always find it difficult to machine the first side flat as seen in the picture. Today I made up a wooden "fence" to mount on my bandsaw, and trimmed the first side off, then mounted it in my mill and took it down to size. Now that I have one flat side, I can mount that flat side to my mill table and mill down the opposite side to end up with a piece of bar stock.  With a steel straight edge held against the flat side now, there is no visible warping or bending. If you tried that with a piece of cold rolled, or even A36 mild steel, it would look like a banana now.--I did find out one other thing today about my gears--they are hardened. Harder than the devil's horn. I was going to open the crankshaft gear out to 3/8", but I tried it with a file first, and a file just skates off it.  Not wanting to ruin a drill or reamer, I decided to leave it at 8mm. They come with a stock bore of 8 millimeters (0.3150"). The only real difference that makes to me is that the flywheel on the gear side will have to have an 8 mm bore.

Offline Art K

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2019, 02:13:19 AM »
Brian,
I realize you already trimmed the stock to make a flat crank. But why not do two centers turn the crank throw then the mains to the ID bearing size then machine the counter weights in the opposite side. No need to bolt on counter weights that may or may not fly off at some point in time.

This is the end result of my Upshur crank, after some adjustments to make it fit inside the case.
Art
PS, It will spin at 7500 rpm
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #39 on: March 27, 2019, 12:22:11 PM »
Art--The stock I had wasn't big enough to do that with. I know it looks good, but there would be a lot of machining if the original stock was large enough to turn both the crankshafts and counterweights form one solid piece.

Offline Art K

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #40 on: March 27, 2019, 02:20:32 PM »
Brian,
Now that makes prefect sense.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #41 on: March 27, 2019, 02:37:06 PM »
Now we have the round 1144 stressproof steel reduced to a flat-bar. The edges are still rounded, but that's okay. I had to remove a 3/8" depth of material from the rounded side. I can only comfortably take a 0.015" depth of cut in steel with my mill, so that's a lot of cranking back and forth. There is a little tip in this picture. If your milling vice is narrow like mine is at 3" and you are concerned about setting up a longer piece to keep it perfectly parallel to the mill bed, then block the ends up with 1 2 3  blocks and parallels so the piece is truly level, and just use the vice to squeeze it there and keep it in place. A couple of good raps with a dead blow hammer make certain that the piece didn't lift up at one end or the other when you tighten the vice.

Offline crueby

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #42 on: March 27, 2019, 02:41:11 PM »
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #43 on: March 27, 2019, 05:29:57 PM »
This is the part of crankshaft turning which had by far the highest "pucker factor". I got thru it okay--I'm always thankful for that. I'm off to Tim Hortons to buy a bagel, and then if I'm lucky I'll get the two ends done this afternoon.

Offline crueby

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Re: Sideshaft i.c. Horizontal engine
« Reply #44 on: March 27, 2019, 06:29:18 PM »
Great start on the crankshaft - did you saw away part of the slot first, or just do it all on the lathe?