Author Topic: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine  (Read 5521 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2019, 04:25:28 PM »
Thanks Tom,

Attention turns now to the east and west walls of the diorama. The window material is .30 plastic sheeting. Easy to score and snap, but the radii at the top have to be shaped on the 1" belt sander.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2019, 12:55:04 AM »
The door looks fantastic John. Nicely done indeed.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2019, 08:40:30 PM »
Thanks Bill.

Mullions on the right, muntins on the left - this work can cross your eyes!


Offline J.L.

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Ladders
« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2019, 10:24:07 PM »
Each of the previous dioramas had at least one ladder on hooks or standing against walls. In close quarters, it would be something to wield a 12ft. ladder amongst belts and machines to get them near line shaft bearings. There would have to be several scattered around the mill floor.

I saw one vintage photo of a group of sober looking men looking at the camera with what looked like hundreds of belts rising in the background.

A pattern keeps the sides of the ladders parallel. The stringers were glued together at each end while drilling the holes.


 
« Last Edit: March 03, 2019, 08:36:28 PM by J.L. »

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2019, 11:30:10 AM »
The ladders looks great John - so I feel bad about mention that almost all ladders made from wood I've seen in my life looked like the unpainted one, except they would have been marked with stains and dirt from use ….

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #35 on: March 02, 2019, 07:45:46 PM »
Todays post finishes the setting of the stage for the Lincoln engine. The top ledger around the walls in photo one will seat the line shaft beams after the engine is in place.

The red arrow in photo two indicates that the east wall of the diorama is removable at this point. It will be taken out when the raised pedistal for the engine and all the railings around the pedistal are in place. I think it will give more access to what is to come.

No word on the castings from Blackgates yet.  :shrug:

John

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #36 on: March 02, 2019, 09:54:54 PM »
Looking great John. You will be ready for the castings whenever they arrive.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #37 on: March 04, 2019, 10:17:47 PM »
Hi Bill,
Well, Blackgates hasn't come through for me yet, but today I received a 3" cast iron flywheel of quality from Martin Model & Pattern in Oregon.


Offline pgp001

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #38 on: March 04, 2019, 10:28:12 PM »
John

Just to whet your appetite whilst waiting, this is my casting set for the twin tandem compound version. Note these are an early set in iron not gunmetal.



I bought them second hand with only the flywheel missing, I since purchased one of those from Bob Potter before he passed the business on to Blackgates.

Phil

Offline Larry Sw

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #39 on: March 05, 2019, 04:31:58 PM »
Hi John,
Just a little side note as I find your model making fascinating.
Most wooden ladders that I'm familiar with have been tapered
with the wider part at the bottom, for stability. On old wooden extension
ladders the upper sliding part was straight though.
I once had to climb all the way up a fully extended 36' wooden extension
ladder to paint the side of a building.  Boy did that thing bounce.  :(
I was much younger then BTW.

Larry S

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #40 on: March 05, 2019, 05:43:48 PM »
That's the opposite of my experience and I've climbed quite a few "pole" ladders on scaffolding. Wooden extensions would also need to be parallel so the wider lower one can guide the thinner upper ones.

The only common tapered type are those that were used by window cleaners as the pointed top allowed the ladder to rest on the narrow window mullions. But health and safety has stopped most using ladders around here. The old steeple jack's ladders also had a very slight taper to them

step ladders usually have a taper
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 05:59:21 PM by Jasonb »

Offline crueby

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #41 on: March 05, 2019, 08:03:26 PM »
The wood ladder we had when I was growing up (it is still at my mothers house, I still use it several times a year) had the straight upper extension, but on the lower section the bottom half did flare out at the base, but top half of it was straight, to guide the upper section. I would imagine that there were many combinations from different makers, these were all well before the ANSI standard ladder!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #42 on: March 05, 2019, 09:30:52 PM »
Interesting discussion about ladders gentlemen. What I've wondered about is where the ladders rested at the top. On one model diorama, I built a wooden 'stand-off'  so the ladder stringers would not rest on the revolving line shaft. The boys could scurry up the ladders with their grease pots and lubricate the line shaft bearings.

I suppose they could have inset metal rails to the edges of the stringers for durability, but I don't think they would want the ladders to rest on the shaft.

An interesting time.

John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #43 on: March 09, 2019, 06:20:56 PM »
Castings...?  :shrug:

Offline crueby

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #44 on: March 09, 2019, 07:26:22 PM »
Bummer on no castings yet - make up a little banner saying 'steam engine goes here' and send them a picture of that in the diorama?   :(