Author Topic: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine  (Read 5519 times)

Offline scc

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2019, 09:09:04 PM »
Me too :popcorn:           Terry

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2019, 11:05:20 PM »
Glad to see those plastic templates being used John. The project is coming on very nicely.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2019, 11:12:11 AM »
Glad to have everyone aboard.
I've got to keep myself busy until those castings arrive.

Tom, I can't thank you enough for those templates.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2019, 01:44:11 PM »
Coming along very well John. Those stencils really produce a fine result!!

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2019, 02:34:33 PM »
I agree fellows. The brickwork does look real when finished.

I have put a fire door in the south wall. It makes me think of my summer job days many years ago when I passed through such an opening at the Quaker Oats Company of Peterborough. Even some of the shcools I taught in had fire doors in the basement.

The boiler room is on the other side of that south wall. In many factories, I notice they build a separate boiler house not attached to the mill. It is set apart in the event of fire or explosion. Our fire door will be metal clad, but I'm sure of little use in such cases.

On December 11, 1916,  there was a devestating explosion at Quaker Oats that blew the east side of the factory into the river and ravaged the rest of the building with fire.  Recent photos can be found on Google ("The Inside Story of the 1916 Quaker Fire Released").


 
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 03:57:26 PM by J.L. »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2019, 02:36:30 PM »
Any idea when the castings will arrive John?

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2019, 02:38:35 PM »
Hi Bill,
No, not a clue. I hope I'm not just buildiing a glorified doll house!
John

Offline pgp001

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2019, 09:31:39 PM »
There are some casting for sale here if you get stuck.
http://www.myford-lathes.com/steam65.html

I just noticed that the currently available ones are in gunmetal, mine must be very early ones because they are all cast iron.
I much prefer iron to gunmetal because you can leave some bits unpainted and they are the correct finish, bare gunmetal does not look right on a scale engine somehow.

Phil

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2019, 11:04:20 PM »
Phil, I totally agree with you. Gunmetal just does not work for me either. The Bolton No. 7 con rod came with a gumetal casting. Can you believe that?
John

Offline J.L.

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The Firedoor
« Reply #24 on: February 20, 2019, 12:28:22 PM »
The firedoor between the engine room and boiler room is metal clad - probably sheet tin. It would have been cut into panels and nailed to the wooden core of the door.

To represent these metal panels, I used a  3 in. roll of  silver sticky paper backed foil tape used by tinsmiths to seal duct joints. The panels were cut with a guillotine paper cutter. I attempted to represent the nails with dimples on the front side of the door, but gave up on that idea when I realized they would be lost in the priming and paiting processes.

Notice in the second picture that the top of the door is not parallel to the bottom of the door. It is angled eight degrees.

Edit: I just rolled white paint on the front of the door . The dimples I made around each pane to represent the nails.do show through on the front side.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 01:03:47 PM by J.L. »

Offline bent

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #25 on: February 20, 2019, 08:46:34 PM »
That is some neat brickwork.  And I like the idea of using the pink spackle too, lets you see where things have dried enough to move to the next bit.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2019, 01:47:19 PM »
Thanks.

The door hangs on a track with steel roller pulleys.


Offline J.L.

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Firedoor Two
« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2019, 08:35:05 PM »
This small photo (public domain) was inspiration for much of my diorama work with firedoors. The closer you look at the photo, the more you see. Notice that interesting window at the far end. This abandoned factory would be late  20th century.

My track bar is 1/8" x 1/4" x 12" cold rolled steel.

« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 10:17:37 AM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2019, 10:15:53 AM »
The firedoor...

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Lincoln Cross Compound Mill Engine
« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2019, 01:06:25 PM »
Looking good as usual John ... that brickwork is nicely done. The sliding door certainly looks the part as well.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!