Author Topic: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version  (Read 14818 times)

Offline Neil-Lickfold

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #90 on: March 06, 2019, 04:43:24 AM »
I see you have indexing holes on the back of the chuck mount.
Can you send a picture of the setup with the spindle on the cross slide and showing the mechanism that the indexing chuck works with please.
Great stuff to see for sure.
Just cant beat mandrels etc for holding stuff, especially when you are making more than 1.
Neil

Offline Ramon

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #91 on: March 06, 2019, 01:44:21 PM »
Hi Neil,

I have, at some time in the past, posted pics of the dividing set up. I've no idea in which thread but still have the images on file. At the risk of being accused of repeating myself I guess it's worth a second look for those who may not have seen it so will do something for you later. Currently finishing off those last ali bits.

Thanks for that last email - been a bit preoccupied of late but will respond

Regards - Tug
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline Ramon

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #92 on: March 07, 2019, 08:01:54 PM »
Hi Guys,

Today saw the last of the ali parts save the con-rods  :)

 First though - Neil, here are a few pics of my dividing set up.

I use the bull wheel for 60 divs and an simple indent plate to lock. The top of the lathe casting was milled off to give a flat area at the correct height.


The plate is removed and replaced with another detent that locates in the holes in the chuck - these give 48 and 50 divs respectively



The cross slide milling spindle attachment is home made. It has a quill which is useful at times and can be set at an angle to drill/mill for instance the transfer passages in a liner


Hope that's of use to you and maybe any others who haven't seen it before. Apologies to those who have ::)



The prop drivers have a very deep curve to the outer profile but proved easier to machine than first thought. Three blanks were bored and tapered bored to dimension. Without changing the top slide setting, a tapered mandrel was turned to hold them for the remaining ops. To do this a boring tool was used and the lathe run in reverse


The blanks were held on the mandrel by a 4BA screw and a form tool used to form the profile. This was just ground free hand - nothing exact, radius wise - and cut well from start to finish.





The knurling was done in the usual fashion - lathe run in reverse (keeps the knurl against it's holder) and slowly moved in toward the centre (note the knurled washer on the over run ;)). Big problem for me is that I don't have flood coolant and this is one job that would really benefit from it. Its just a matter of taking things slowly and trying to keep the wheel clean with a small wire brush.


Finished ready for the brass collets. These will be made later but with the cross top slide still unmoved and turned in the same reverse way as the mandrel was.


The venturi's were simple turning jobs as were the prop nuts so here's how the parts made so far all look now. The colour coded venturi's is to ensure that the cross hole matches the thread pull up. The back plates, made some time back, are in the safest place to prevent any minor damage to the threads - liberally coated with anti gall grease and temporarily nipped up home in their cases.



Well you did say you wanted more - hope that is what you meant  :)

Before staring the internal parts I'm going to finish off the ali parts outstanding on another engine.

Back soon - Tug








« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 10:07:31 PM by Ramon »
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #93 on: March 07, 2019, 08:06:39 PM »
Absolutely,positively, unequivocally, beautiful  :praise2:  Ain’t much else to say, besides, the drool on the keyboard makes it somewhat difficult to type (Shite man  :lolb:)

Whiskey

Online sco

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #94 on: March 07, 2019, 08:54:39 PM »
Brilliant work Tug and some ideas to file away for future reference!

Simon.
Ars longa, vita brevis.

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #95 on: March 07, 2019, 10:20:37 PM »
Truly enjoyable to watch and beautiful parts - I'm betting on yet tree more stunners when you are finished  :praise2:

Offline 10KPete

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #96 on: March 07, 2019, 10:38:19 PM »
Beautiful work! I've never attempted an aero engine. I've flown a few.....

I really like seeing how the parts are made and discussions on the fine points are very welcome here.

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Jenki

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #97 on: March 08, 2019, 12:40:56 AM »
Hi Tug. I am not a machinist, I just "play" on a very old lathe. But I do know enough to realise what you have done so far (and on your previous engine builds) is something very special.

Keep up the good work and keep the pictures coming!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #98 on: March 08, 2019, 01:14:49 AM »
Beautiful family shot Tug!
Your work is always amazing.

Dave

Offline Neil-Lickfold

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #99 on: March 08, 2019, 02:58:51 AM »
Thanks for the photos of your setup. Great stuff.

Offline Art K

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #100 on: March 08, 2019, 04:29:28 AM »
Tug,
I think what Whiskey is trying to say is "Holy Toledo that is some mighty fine work" At least if I miss quote him that is what I'm saying
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Allen Smithee

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #101 on: March 08, 2019, 02:19:34 PM »
Interesting, inspring and educational in equal abundance, as ever!

One question - I get the various reasons why you're running the lathe in reverse, but how do you stop the chuck climbing off the spindle when you do?

AS
Quidquid latine dictum sit altum sonatur

Offline Ramon

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #102 on: March 08, 2019, 04:24:45 PM »
Hi Guys - thanks for looking in and your kind comments - particularly you 'Jenki' for taking the time to register just to do so - appreciated  :ThumbsUp:

Art - don't you fear none - I have that ol south'n boy weighed up    :ROFL: he ain't foolin me none  :lolb:

AS - I don't have any means to prevent it but do make sure that the chuck is nipped up tight beforehand. I often screw cut in reverse if working to a close shoulder ie working from the shoulder. Obviously with screw cutting, as with the method of doing the tapers, only light cuts are taken so no real strain is involved.

Though it doesn't mean it won't occur, to date I've not experienced the chuck loosening in any way so don't give it much thought but you are right in that it could happen.


Well after a month of ali swarf build up I just had to have a clear up ::). It's taken the best part of the day. Workshop's now nice and pristine ready for a restart back on the last of those JLE parts. Not much there to do but enough to put these on hold for a week or so. Plus, you may recall I said elsewhere about the building work going on down the bottom of the garden - well in just over a year thirty eight trees have gone and have been replaced with three bungalows. Despite having had such a lovely backdrop over the years the light this has let into the garden is really beneficial. Today though, the work on our boundary finally began so it's going to be an even bigger distraction when the weather is fine in coming days if not weeks.

I'll get back on these as soon as possible however but bear with it for a few days eh ;) in the meantime my thanks again for all your comments

Regards - Tug
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline Neil-Lickfold

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #103 on: March 08, 2019, 08:19:38 PM »
With a vfd and a micro switch, allows the control to stop the lathe and carriage to less than 0.1mm at 200rpm or so depending on the pitch of the thread being cut. You can easily stop it in the range of the normal thread relief. On a fibe pitch thread it can be stopped within about 0.04 or less every time.

Online sco

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Re: The Oliver Tiger Mk III - a 5cc Version
« Reply #104 on: March 08, 2019, 09:06:58 PM »
With a vfd and a micro switch, allows the control to stop the lathe and carriage to less than 0.1mm at 200rpm or so depending on the pitch of the thread being cut. You can easily stop it in the range of the normal thread relief. On a fibe pitch thread it can be stopped within about 0.04 or less every time.

Is this using a 'dead stop' feature in the vfd or making allowance for a normal ramp down to zero?

Simon.
Ars longa, vita brevis.