Author Topic: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine  (Read 3605 times)

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #15 on: December 26, 2018, 09:22:38 PM »
:thinking: It didn't need much gin to get that finish John. Or was that just enticement to encourage you to get it done  ;)

Jo
Quite right: I was,looking forward to my reward!
John

Offline kvom

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2018, 12:34:58 PM »
A friend of mine is just starting a build of a #9.  He doesn't post online but perhaps I'll get pics one of these days.

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2018, 07:26:49 PM »
Realigning the Bearings

Now I've got it running I started taking it apart for closer examination and subsequent painting. Gawd, it's a mess...
The lower halves of the crank bearings were not the same thickness, and were sitting 15 thou and 40 thou respectively proud of the chairs, which were not the same depth, so tightening up the top halves on the studs turned them into quite effective G clamps! In addition, the running base for the crosshead was like a ploughed field, so that had to be sorted out. I'm going to make a new crosshead from bronze, so I can compensate for the 15 thou drop in height.
All good fun!

Clocking up on the EMCO
WP_20181227_16_27_04_Pro by inkaboat, on Flickr

The chairs are now the same depth and perpendicular. The bearings are about two thou proud which is probably about right.
WP_20181227_17_24_37_Pro by inkaboat, on Flickr

A nice flat base for the cross head.
WP_20181227_18_14_49_Pro by inkaboat, on Flickr



Offline ettingtonliam

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2018, 07:10:42 PM »
Originally the No.9 had a forged crankshaft, (or maybe a steel casting) at least mine did in 1965. Yours seems to be missing the valve rod support casting, though the bedplate has been drilled for it. Its a slightly different casting if you want to fit the governor (Oh, please do, it looks so much better)
Mine was built without the benefit of a milling machine, so the bearing housings were filed out, and the lower bearings filed to fit. Closely supervised by my teacher I may say, so they were a pretty close fit in the end.
The inlet ports were cast in, but the exhaust port wasn't, so I had to chop it out with a weeny cold chisel---.
It did run in the end though.

Are you sure that 4" dia boiler is going to be big enough to run an engine with a 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cylinder?

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2018, 07:21:46 PM »
Are you sure that 4" dia boiler is going to be big enough to run an engine with a 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cylinder?

My 3" boiler runs an engine I build using a no9 cylinder, it won't run at high speed for long but at a modest speed it will run all day for demo purposes.


Offline simplyloco

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2018, 07:41:19 PM »
Are you sure that 4" dia boiler is going to be big enough to run an engine with a 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cylinder?

My 3" boiler runs an engine I build using a no9 cylinder, it won't run at high speed for long but at a modest speed it will run all day for demo purposes.



Excellent! By a happy coincidence, I'm building a 4" Scotch boiler strictly to the KN Harris design  to demo the little Sirius that I will be making soon. I've not made any connection to it on this thread as this No.9 is a pleasant interlude while I wait for the Sirius crankcase to arrive, so the question was quite unnecessary.
John
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 07:44:31 PM by simplyloco »

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2018, 07:56:00 PM »

Excellent! By a happy coincidence, I'm building a 4" Scotch boiler strictly to the KN Harris design  to demo the little Sirius that I will be making soon.

John, are you intending to show your boiler build here?  I'd be interested to see how it develops  :)

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2018, 08:19:13 PM »

John, are you intending to show your boiler build here?  I'd be interested to see how it develops  :)

Probably, as the people on the MECH site aren't that interested in things that don't move under their own power... :ShakeHead:
I could combine it with the Sirius build.
John

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2018, 09:05:34 PM »
That would be great thanks  :)

Offline ettingtonliam

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2018, 09:19:12 PM »
Are you sure that 4" dia boiler is going to be big enough to run an engine with a 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cylinder?

My 3" boiler runs an engine I build using a no9 cylinder, it won't run at high speed for long but at a modest speed it will run all day for demo purposes.



Excellent! By a happy coincidence, I'm building a 4" Scotch boiler strictly to the KN Harris design  to demo the little Sirius that I will be making soon. I've not made any connection to it on this thread as this No.9 is a pleasant interlude while I wait for the Sirius crankcase to arrive, so the question was quite unnecessary.
John

So sorry you find my question to be quite unnecessary. You did comment in your first post that the Scotch boiler would power the No.9. Stuart's catalogue for 1974 suggests their Babcock No. 504 boiler with a drum 3 1/2" dia x 10 long will steam the No. 9 just for demonstration purposes, and I think the Babcock is somewhat bigger than the Scotch boiler.

Offline oehrick

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2019, 05:55:12 PM »
Compare the heating surfaces, the Stuart 'Babcock' is a pot boiler with a very few watertubes, the Scotch is an internal furnace multiple firetube boiler, no comparison IMO and working hard the #9 has a healthy appetite
Cheers, Rick in Bogside-on-Bure - Where Stationary Steam is still alive !

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Restoring a Stuart Turner No. 9 Mill Engine
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2019, 06:43:41 PM »
All the way from China for 40 quid, delivered! Lovely bit of kit, and the valve starts to operate at about 600 rpm. I don't know if it will stay where it is  now, there's a problem with the steam delivery!
BTW, a machined governor castings set from Stuart Turner costs 317.88 and it still has to be assembled... :Mad:

20190326_181518 by inkaboat, on Flickr