Author Topic: building the Frisco Standard Model  (Read 15182 times)

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #60 on: January 12, 2019, 01:03:36 AM »
Bill, Dave, Brian, Art; thanks for your comments.  Thanks for everyone silently stopping by too.

Brian:
Machining crankshafts makes your old heart go "pitter-patter", doesn't it!!!
:NotWorthy:

Art: your estimate was spot on.  I have around two inches of tooling reaching into the throw.  I couldnít do much more.  I purchased some Ĺ inch tooling specifically for this task since my 3/8th inch tooling wasnít long enough.

You know, you really need to refer to the drawings every once in a while. :stickpoke:  After I finished the first throw and had setup for the second, I remembered that I needed to add this profile in the piece between the throws.  Since I have the 2nd throw already set up, might as well address that one and then go back and do the first.

Here Iím just getting started.



And here Iíve just finished this detail for the second throw.



A detail I need to finish on this side of the throw is cutting a curve in the top of the minor and major throws.  Since we all like videos and I was getting kind-a bored hereís a video of the process.


With the crankshaft turned around and back in the lathe where it was for the first setup, :facepalm2: Iím starting on the detail for the first throw as I did above.  Since this is cosmetic, Iím not too concerned about not having this detail exactly concentric to the connecting rod journal.

 

A video of the same.  Since someone is bound to comment :stickpoke: on the small divot in the connecting rod journal I guess I need to explain.  Just a moment of inattention while on the mill and my end mill took this divot out of the journal. :disappointed:  Itís very small and shouldnít affect operation of the engine; in fact it might help it in that it probably will retain oil in the journal.  If you press me on it Iím going to claim that I did it on purpose. :naughty:



All done working inside these throws.  Only outside work remaining to complete. :pinkelephant:

« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 01:20:47 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #61 on: January 12, 2019, 01:16:15 AM »
Take a divot out of the part from a moments in attention!?    Naaw   I've never done that!!!! :embarassed: ::) :hammerbash: :zap: :Mad:

Looks good from here Craig!
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Offline 10KPete

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #62 on: January 12, 2019, 01:30:32 AM »
 :ThumbsUp:

 :popcorn: :popcorn:

Pete
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Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #63 on: January 12, 2019, 10:03:39 PM »
Dave and Pete; thanks for your input.  Thanks to those following along too.

It was a PLEASURE to be working outside the crankshaft throws today.  First order of business was to mill off these two bosses I machined into the stock to assist milling the crankshaft throws.  Donít need them anymore and in fact, theyíre in the way now.



This is the last time Iíll be locating the work piece in the 4-jaw chuck and laboriously centering it.



With the piece centered, Iím turning a round end to grip with the 3-jaw chuck.  Iíll be working the piece on itís true center from now forward.



With an appropriate fixture turned to accept the 3-jaw chuck, Iíve removed lots of excess material.  I have to say, the piece, after nearly a week of work, looks like itís ready for the scrap bin.  Letís hope that changes in the next few days.

« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 01:26:04 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline crueby

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #64 on: January 13, 2019, 12:15:31 AM »
Quite a lot of work so far, great job!

Offline gbritnell

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #65 on: January 13, 2019, 03:22:18 AM »
While crankshafts look relatively simple there's a lot of careful setup and whittling to finish them. Just take your time and you'll get there.
gbritnell
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Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #66 on: January 13, 2019, 09:52:37 PM »
Chris & George, thanks for your remarks.

George: Iíll agree, and Iím only making a two throw crank; I canít imagine the care and concentration to make one with eight or more throws as you (and others here) have done.

I can see the light at the end of the tunnel with this crankshaft now.  Mounted between centers (those center holes I drilled so long ago ;)), Iím starting to whittle on an outside throw side.



With the outside throw side roughed out, Iím working one side of the shaft down.




Here I have the first shaft nearly complete.  I leave the first shaft a little over size, turn the other, then come back and finish this first one.  Maybe overkill, but I donít want a little material movement while Iím removing lots of material on the other shaft side to shift this side out of alignment.



After turning the piece around in the lathe, Iím repeating the procedure on this final side.  Here, again, Iím roughing in the outside throw side.



With the outside throw side roughed in, Iím starting to work down this shaft side toward the final diameter.

« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 01:32:34 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #67 on: January 13, 2019, 10:22:11 PM »
Coming along nicely Craig!

Dave

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #68 on: January 13, 2019, 10:25:24 PM »
Yeah that is starting to clean up nice!!!

Terrifying at times isn't it..... :paranoia:
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #69 on: January 13, 2019, 10:37:26 PM »
Looks good to me Craig!! That thing is good sized too.

Bill

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #70 on: January 14, 2019, 12:22:03 AM »
Terrifying at times isn't it..... :paranoia:

You betcha !  :o

The other thing I havenít mentioned yet is the way you get to practice your dance moves ;)

With that semi-square piece in the lathe, turning at around 200 RPM, there are over 13 red hot little curls of metal springing off the work piece each second.  The probability is low, but there are so many of them that occasionally mere quantity overcomes low probability and one of those red hot lathe tailings arcs up through the air and lands on your collar or the opening in your shirt  :naughty:, then finds its way down inside your shirt  :o.

As I said above, an opportunity to practice your dance moves. :embarassed: :mischief: :naughty:
Craig

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #71 on: January 14, 2019, 12:23:52 AM »
Terrifying at times isn't it..... :paranoia:

You betcha !  :o

The other thing I havenít mentioned yet is the way you get to practice your dance moves ;)

With that semi-square piece in the lathe, turning at around 200 RPM, there are over 13 red hot little curls of metal springing off the work piece each second.  The probability is low, but there are so many of them that occasionally mere quantity overcomes low probability and one of those red hot lathe tailings arcs up through the air and lands on your collar or the opening in your shirt  :naughty:, then finds its way down inside your shirt  :o.

As I said above, an opportunity to practice your dance moves. :embarassed: :mischief: :naughty:

Ahyup! 8)
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Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #72 on: January 14, 2019, 01:05:56 AM »
I have an old arc welding helmet with the dark lens removed, only the clear lens left in it. Whenever I get into those red hot flying chip jobs I put it on. Looks silly as hell, but once you've had a red hot chip go down your shirt collar and set your chest hairs on fire it doesn't seem silly at all!!!

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #73 on: January 14, 2019, 01:51:34 AM »
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: building the Frisco Standard Model
« Reply #74 on: January 14, 2019, 10:04:37 PM »
Thanks for those of you hanging in with me on this build, especially with this crankshaft fabrication; it was a long slogÖ but completed today (well, not really, I still need to cut the key ways)

Today was spent turning the two shafts down to their finished diameters.  I took my time with light cuts and probably made more passes than I needed, but after all that work I really didnít want to mess up here at the end.




And so, after cutting away a few pieces that were left over from the way in which I fabricated this crankshaft, and after filing and polishing away the tool marks, I give you a picture of the completed part.



Of course, the ďproof in the puddingĒ is to install the thing and see if it fits, and turns freely with no binding.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 01:35:47 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig